Little Town on the Prairie (Little House Series: Classic Stories #7)

( 25 )

Overview

The little settlement that weathered the long, hard winter of 1880-81 is now a growing town. Laura is growing up, and she goes to her first evening social. Mary is at last able to go to a college for the blind. Best of all, Almanzo Wilder asks permission to walk home from church with Laura. And Laura, now fifteen years old, receives her certificate to teach school.

Originally published in 1941, Little Town on the Prairie is the ...

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Overview

The little settlement that weathered the long, hard winter of 1880-81 is now a growing town. Laura is growing up, and she goes to her first evening social. Mary is at last able to go to a college for the blind. Best of all, Almanzo Wilder asks permission to walk home from church with Laura. And Laura, now fifteen years old, receives her certificate to teach school.

Originally published in 1941, Little Town on the Prairie is the seventh book in the Little House Series.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780064400077
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2008
  • Series: Little House Series , #7
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 238,420
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.17 (w) x 7.65 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Laura Ingalls Wilder was born in 1867 in the log cabin described in Little House in the Big Woods. She and her family traveled by covered wagon across the Midwest. Later, Laura and her husband, Almanzo Wilder, made their own covered-wagon trip with their daughter, Rose, to Mansfield, Missouri. There, believing in the importance of knowing where you began in order to appreciate how far you've come, Laura wrote about her childhood growing up on the American frontier. For millions of readers Laura lives on forever as the little pioneer girl in the beloved Little House books.

Garth Williams began his work on the pictures for the Little House books by meeting Laura Ingalls Wilder at her home in Missouri, and then he traveled to the sites of all the little houses. His charming art caused Laura to remark that she and her family "live again in these illustrations."

Biography

"I wanted the children now to understand more about the beginnings of things, to know what is behind the things they see -- what it is that made America as they know it," Laura Ingalls Wilder once said. Wilder was born in 1867, more than 60 years before she began writing her autobiographical fiction, and had witnessed the transformation of the American frontier from a barely populated patchwork of homestead lots to a bustling society of towns, trains and telephones.

Early pictures of Laura Ingalls show a young woman in a buttoned, stiff-collared dress, but there's nothing prim or quaint about the childhood she memorialized in her Little House books. Along with the expected privations of prairie life, the Ingalls family faced droughts, fires, blizzards, bears and grasshopper plagues. Although she didn't graduate from high school, Wilder had enough schooling to get a teaching license, and took her first teaching job at the age of 15.

Later, Wilder and her husband settled on a farm in the Missouri Ozarks, where Wilder began writing about farm life for newspapers and magazines. She didn't try her hand at books until 1930, when she started chronicling her childhood at the urging of her daughter Rose. Her first effort at an autobiography, Pioneer Girl, failed to find a publisher, but it spurred a second effort, a set of eight "historical novels," as Wilder called them, based on her own life.

Little House in the Big Woods (1932) was an instant hit. It was followed by a new volume every two years or so, and the series' success snowballed until thousands of fans were waiting eagerly for each new installment. "Ms. Wilder has caught the very essence of pioneer life, the satisfaction of hard work, the thrill of accomplishment, safety and comfort made possible through resourcefulness and exertion," said the New York Times review of Little House on the Prairie (1935).

In 1954, the American Library Association established the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award to honor the lifetime achievement of a children's author or illustrator; Wilder herself was the first recipient. After Wilder's death in 1957, historical societies sprang up to preserve what they could of her childhood homes, and her manuscripts and journals provided the material for several more books. A TV series based on the books, Little House on the Prairie, ran from 1974 to 1984 and renewed interest in Wilder's work and life. More recently, fictionalized biographies of her daughter, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother have appeared.

Wilder's books have now been translated into over 40 languages, and still provide an engrossing history lesson for young readers, as well as insight into the frontier values that Wilder once catalogued as "courage, self-reliance, independence, integrity and helpfulness" -- values, in her words, worth "as much today as they ever were to help us over the rough places."

Good To Know

Wilder's daughter, the writer Rose Wilder Lane, helped revise her mother's books; the collaboration was so extensive that one biographer proposed Rose was the "real" author of the Little House books. Most agree that Rose was, if not author or co-author, instrumental in suggesting the project to her mother and shaping it for publication.

After her books were published, fan mail for Wilder poured in; among more than a thousand cards and gifts she received for her birthday in 1951 was a cablegram of congratulations from General Douglas MacArthur.

Wilder, who had grown up making long journeys by covered wagon, took her first airplane ride at the age of 87, on a visit to Rose in Danbury, Connecticut.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Mrs. A.J. Wilder
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1867
    2. Place of Birth:
      Pepin, Wisconsin
    1. Date of Death:
      February 10, 1957
    2. Place of Death:
      Mansfield, Missouri

Read an Excerpt

Little Town on the Prairie


By Laura Ingalls Wilder

Rebound by Sagebrush

Copyright ©2003 Laura Ingalls Wilder
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0613714253

Springtime On The Claim



After the October Blizzard last fall, they had all moved to town and for a little while Laura had gone to school there. Then the storms had stopped school, and all through that long winter the blizzards had howled between the houses, shutting them off from each other so that day after day and night after night not a voice could be heard and not a light could be seen through the whirling snow.

All winter long, they had been crowded in the little kitchen, cold and hungry and working hard in the dark and the cold to twist enough hay to keep the fire going and to grind wheat in the coffee mill for the day's bread.

All that long, long winter, the only hope had been that sometime winter must end, sometime blizzards must stop, the sun would shine warm again and they could all get away from the town and go back to the homestead claim.

Now it was springtime. The Dakota prairie lay so warm and bright under the shining sun that it did not seem possible that it had ever been swept by the winds and snows of that hard winter. How wonderful it was, to be on the claim again! Laura wanted nothing more than just being outdoors. She felt she never could get enough sunshine soaked into her bones.

In the dawns when she wentto the well at the edge of the slough to fetch the morning pail of fresh water, the sun was rising in a glory of colors. Meadow larks were flying, singing, up from the dew-wet grass. Jack rabbits hopped beside the path, their bright eyes watching and their long ears twitching as they daintily nibbled their breakfast of tender grass tips.

Laura was in the shanty only long enough to set down the water and snatch the milk pail. She ran out to the slope where Ellen, the cow, was cropping the sweet young grass. Quietly Ellen stood chewing her cud while Laura milked.

Warm and sweet, the scent of new milk came up from the streams hissing into the rising foam, and it mixed with the scents of springtime. Laura's bare feet were wet and cool in the dewy grass, the sunshine was warm on her neck, and Ellen's flank was warmer against her cheek. On its own little picket rope, Ellen's baby calf bawled anxiously, and Ellen answered with a soothing moo.

When Laura had stripped the last creamy drops of milk, she lugged the pail to the shanty. Ma poured some of the warm new milk into the calf's pail. The rest she strained through a clean white cloth into tin milk pans, and Laura carefully carried them down cellar while Ma skimmed thick cream from last night's milk. Then she poured the skimmed milk into the calf's pail, and Laura carried it to the hungry calf.

Teaching the calf to drink was not easy, but always interesting. The wobbly-legged baby calf had been born believing that it must butt hard with its little red poll, to get milk. So when it smelled the milk in the pail, it tried to butt the pail.

Laura must keep it from spilling the milk, if she could, and she had to teach it how to drink, because it didn't know. She dipped her fingers into the milk and let the calf's rough tongue suck them, and gently she led its nose down to the milk in the pail. The calf suddenly snorted milk into its nose, sneezed it out with a whoosh that splashed milk out of the pail, and then with all its might it butted into the milk. It butted so hard that Laura almost lost hold of the pail. A wave of milk went over the calf's head and a splash wet the front of Laura's dress.

So, patiently she began again, dipping her fingers for the calf to suck, trying to keep the milk in the pail and to teach the calf to drink it. In the end, some of the milk was inside the calf.

Then Laura pulled up the picket pins. One by one, she led Ellen, the baby calf and the yearling calf to fresh places in the soft, cool grass. She drove the iron pins deep into the ground. The sun was fully up now, the whole sky was blue, and the whole earth was waves of grass flowing in the wind. And Ma was calling.

"Hurry, Laura! Breakfast's waiting!"

In the shanty, Laura quickly washed her face and hands at the washbasin. She threw out the water in a sparkling curve falling on grass where the sun would swiftly dry it. She ran the comb through her hair, over her head to the dangling braid. There was never time before breakfast to undo the long braid, brush her hair properly, and plait it again. She would do that after the morning's work was done.

Sitting in her place beside Mary, she looked across the clean, red-checked tablecloth and the glinting dishes at little sister Carrie and baby sister Grace, with their soap-shining morning faces and bright eyes. She looked at Pa and Ma so cheerful and smiling. She felt the sweet morning wind from the wide-open door and window, and she gave a little sigh.

Pa looked at her. He knew how she felt. "I think, myself, it's pretty nice," he said.

"It's a beautiful morning," Ma agreed.

Then after breakfast Pa hitched up the horses, Sam and David, and drove them out on the prairie east of the shanty, where he was breaking ground for sod corn. Ma took charge of the day's work for the rest of them, and best of all Laura liked the days when she said, "I must work in the garden."

Mary eagerly offered to do all the housework, so that Laura could help Ma. Mary was blind. Even in the days before scarlet fever had taken the sight from her clear blue eyes, she had never liked to work outdoors in the sun and wind.



Continues...

Excerpted from Little Town on the Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder Copyright ©2003 by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 25 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 25 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 25, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    wonderful book

    As with all Laura Ingalls Wilder books, this is a wonderful glimps of life on the prarie when the west was being settled. It is suitable for any one of any age. If you read the entire series, you come to know the characters of the books as if they were your neighbors. Good clean reading enjoyment, a favorite with girls in grade school to early middle school.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2009

    Another great Laura Ingalls Wilder book

    Just as good as the other books in the series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2006

    My Review

    I can remember reading the entire Little House series one winter while in grade-school. I¿d read the stories of Laura Ingalls Wilder and her family from a rocking chair in front of the fireplace in my home. In Little Town on the Prairie, the small town of De Smet, where Laura¿s family made their home many years ago, is beginning to grow. De Smet isn¿t the only thing that¿s growing - the Ingalls girls are as well. Mary, now faced with the challenge of being blind, dreams of attending a school for the blind. However, the family is faced with finding the money to make this dream a reality. When Pa tells Laura that he¿s found a job for her in town, her mind begins to race with thought of being able to, ¿earn fifteen dollars, maybe even twenty, to help send Mary to college.¿ Other than helping her sister go to school, Laura¿s dreams are still occupied by the handsome, Almanzo. Though some things are changing for the girls, others remain the same, like the ever-present havoc created by their longtime nemesis, Nellie Olson. Join the Ingalls family and share in the joys and pains that come along with becoming an adult in a Little Town on the Prairie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2005

    a wounderfull life

    This book is wounderfull in every way.Larua works hard to try and get her sister in college.She gradully gets use to life in town.There are points were she whised that her sister Mary didn't go to college.She also meets someone who she realy doesn't whant to see any more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2004

    This book is outstanding!!!!

    I love this book, it is lovingly illustrated and written. All of the chapters are my favorite!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2004

    wow

    i really thought this book was goooood i never wanted to put it down

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2003

    Paige's Book Review

    I would definitely buy this book if you can! It is best for ages 8 through 16. This book is basically about a family moving to a new place and them trying to get used to it. Along the way, it is a bumpy road, but the Ingalls always work it out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2003

    Growing up in De Smet

    This is an excellent Little House book. It includes Mary Ingalls Christian testimony and is a great read like all of the rest of the Little House books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2003

    The best of the Little House Series

    I read the entire Little House series about 5 times since I was a little girl, and this one is by far my favorite out of all them!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2003

    little house in big woods

    this was a truly heart warming story of love and passion. laura has an undeniable talent of making you almost envious of her fun but somewhat simple life. u find ur self learning to luv th characters mentioned

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2000

    Amazingly Funny!!!!!!!

    You start reading the book and you're in a trance. It amazes you with the outragiosly funny scenes and the happiness when Laura gets a teaching certificate. One of the funniest parts in the book (you will be crying it's sssooo funny) when a little door mouse eats Pa's hair!!!!!!! You get nervous and excited about the spelling bee when Laura has to spell the word: Xanthophyll. Enjoy this book while it lasts!

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    Posted April 26, 2009

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