Little Treasures: Endearments from Around the World

Little Treasures: Endearments from Around the World

by Jacqueline Ogburn, Chris Raschka
     
 

A tender collection of endearments for children the world over.
All over the world, people express their love for their children through endearments, such as “sweetie pie” or “peanut.” A child might be called little angel, angelito, in Spanish or precious, bao bei, in Chinese or my sweet little moon, mera chanda, in Hindi.
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Overview

A tender collection of endearments for children the world over.
All over the world, people express their love for their children through endearments, such as “sweetie pie” or “peanut.” A child might be called little angel, angelito, in Spanish or precious, bao bei, in Chinese or my sweet little moon, mera chanda, in Hindi.
Little Treasures offers a wealth of endearments in fourteen languages to share with your own beloved poppet and petit chou.
 

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Move over, “sunshine.” Ogburn and Raschka give families a whole new vocabulary with which to express their love, exploring terms of endearment used around the globe. Impish, doe-eyed figures rendered in broad, calligraphic brushstrokes wear with pride terms like “ducky,” used in England, and “kullanmuru,” which means “nugget of gold” in Finland. Raschka forgoes painting his characters with black, brown, or white skin, instead using gleeful pinks, blues, teals, and greens. The phrases appear both in English and in their original languages (Cyrillic, Mandarin, and Arabic characters are included), with phonetic pronunciations provided for such terms as “xiao pie dou” (“little mischievous pea” in China) and “yeinay filiklik” (“my bubble of joy” in Ethiopia). The message about familial love being a universal human trait is clearly and joyfully articulated; it’s hard to imagine a sweeter concept. Ages 4–8. (Jan.)
From the Publisher

"An effective and satisfying way of introducing the universal facets and feelings of childhood."--School Library Journal "This will have obvious appeal for populations with large ESL groups, but it would also make an excellent gift book for your own honey/pumpkin/sunshine/babycakes."--Bulletin "Move over, "sunshine." Ogburn and Raschka give families a whole new vocabulary with which to express their love. ...The message about familial love being a universal human trait is clearly and joyfully articulated; it’s hard to imagine a sweeter concept." --Publishers Weekly, starred review

"A colorful catalogue of endearments for children spans the globe and expands awareness by showing how love is universal." --Kirkus

"Marvelous illustrations by the Caldecott winner Raschka and an inclusive look at expressions of love from Poland to Uganda. Little 'Light of My Hearts' (Arabic) and 'Little Fatties' (Chile) will relish the experience." --New York Times

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
Little Treasures exemplifies the kind of power a good concept has for celebrating diversity with its underlying message that all over the world families love their children and cannot resist terms of endearment—from the American "pumpkin" (my mother's term) to Mukwano (sweetheart) in Uganda, to mera chanda (my sweet little moon) in Hindu. Chris Raschka's signature graphic illustrations are perfect—he playfully portrays a full rainbow of white, yellow, brown smiling little ones—with some green and orange thrown in for good measure. The book begins with a short introduction, devotes a page or two to the three or four most popular endearments in fourteen countries, and ends up with a reminder that all of them deliver the message every child needs to hear again and again, "I love you!" It should be a staple in early childhood classrooms and in homes everywhere. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3—This collection of "sweet and silly names," spanning 14 languages and 6 continents, offers a beguiling smorgasbord of the ways that families around the world show their affection for their children. Some of the endearments will be familiar to American ears ("honey," "pumpkin," and "sunshine" in the U.S., "poppet," "ducky," and "love" in England, "mon petit chou" in France), but many more surely will be a revelation. They include, "little coconut candy" (docinho de coco) from Brazil, "little mischievous pea" (xiao pie dou) from Mandarin-speaking China, and "my bubble of joy" (yeinay filiklik) from Amharic-speaking Ethiopia. Each endearment is presented with its English translation, native language, pronunciation, and, where applicable, its non-Western characters or alphabetic spelling. Raschka's whimsical illustrations, drawn in ink, watercolor, and gouache on creamy flecked paper, exuberantly depict dozens of no-two-alike children, babies, and extended family members. A selective color palette in muted tones visually defines each nationality's page; the complete color spectrum is reserved for the jacket and concluding page, which express themes of world unity. Pair this with Mem Fox's Whoever You Are (Harcourt, 1997) for an effective and satisfying way of introducing the universal facets and feelings of childhood.—Kathleen Finn, St. Francis Xavier School, Winooski, VT
Kirkus Reviews
A colorful catalogue of endearments for children spans the globe and expands awareness by showing how love is universal. Ogburn (A Dignity of Dragons, illustrated by Nicoletta Ceccoli, 2010) turns her attention to terms of affection used for children. The author organizes the pet names first by language and then by country if necessary. "English-speaking people love their children very much." In America, they may choose "pumpkin"; in England, it may be "poppet"; in Australia, it could be "possum." Preschoolers will giggle at the humor inherent in these names. Animals ("hug bunny" in Finland, "bear cub" in Poland) and foods ("dumpling" in Russia, "my berry" in Ethiopia) are common. Older kids will admire the interesting script and character alphabets in Hindi (Devanagari), Arabic, Russian (Cyrillic) and Mandarin Chinese. Each term appears in English, in its original language and with a phonetic pronunciation to enable all ages to participate in the fun. There is a lot of information in this slim book, and Raschka's playful illustrations of people of all colors--in cheerful rainbow hues--serves to helpfully group the characters of one country or language together. Although not a comprehensive compendium for the reference shelf, what is found within is a huge treasure sure to be utilized by educators and eagerly consumed by future citizens of the world. (author's note) (Informational picture book. 4-8)
Pamela Paul
…fascinating…[with] marvelous illustrations by the Caldecott winner Raschka…
—The New York Times

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547428628
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
01/03/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,361,637
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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