Little Vampire Women
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Little Vampire Women

3.0 34
by Lynn Messina
     
 

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"Christmas wont be Christmas without any corpses."

The dear, sweet March sisters are back, and Marmee has told them to be good little women. Good little vampire women, that is. That's right: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy have grown up since you last read their tale, and now they have (much) longer lives and (much) more ravenous

Overview

"Christmas wont be Christmas without any corpses."

The dear, sweet March sisters are back, and Marmee has told them to be good little women. Good little vampire women, that is. That's right: Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy have grown up since you last read their tale, and now they have (much) longer lives and (much) more ravenous appetites.

Marmee has taught them well, and so they live by an unprecedented moral code of abstinence . . . from human blood. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy must learn to get along with one another, help make society a better place, and avoid the vampire hunters who pose a constant threat to their existence. Plus, Laurie is dying to become a part of the March family, at any cost. Some things never change.

This horrifying—and hilarious—retelling of a timeless American classic will leave readers craving the bloodthirsty drama on each and every page.

Editorial Reviews

Apparently, we've been reading everything all wrong. First, it was Jane Austen. Then Seth Grahame-Smith set us straight with Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Now it's Louisa May Alcott's Little Women. Fortunately, Lynn Messena is here to resurrect (pun quite intended) the previously untold vampiric careers of Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. Blood curdling fun.

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Messina flawlessly maintains the flavor of the original, inserting the vampiric element so seamlessly that it becomes evident that a gothic thread was there all along, waiting to be picked up."
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Messina flawlessly maintains the flavor of the original, inserting the vampiric element so seamlessly that it becomes evident that a gothic thread was there all along, waiting to be picked up.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Messina flawlessly maintains the flavor of the original, inserting the vampiric element so seamlessly that it becomes evident that a gothic thread was there all along, waiting to be picked up.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Messina flawlessly maintains the flavor of the original, inserting the vampiric element so seamlessly that it becomes evident that a gothic thread was there all along, waiting to be picked up.”
VOYA - Jonatha Basye
It is going to be a difficult winter for the March household. Father is off helping with the war effort, while Marmee is left taking care of their four growing daughters. Jo, Meg, Beth, and Amy are attempting to make the best of things. They realize that the typical comforts of home will not be available to them this year. Instead, they will make due with homemade games, becoming friends with their neighbors, the Laurences, and dining on rat's blood. These are not your typical little women—these are little vampire women. No need to worry though—these ladies are devout humanitarians who abstain from drinking human blood. They do, however, have to deal with attempted stakings, a new strain of vampire virus, and the occasional heckling from those who do not understand their ways. Such is life for the March family. For those individuals who have never read Alcott's version of Little Women (Roberts Brothers, 1868), this novel may be difficult to follow. The original novel has been amended to accommodate the vampire story line; however, many of the little nuances that made Little Women a wonderful story are still intact. Unfortunately, that does not save this novel. This updated version of the story feels forced and awkward at several different points. There are also many footnotes, which serve as a way of incorporating the vampire story line, but these feel more like a distraction than anything else. While vampire stories have gained much notoriety with books like Twilight and the House of Night series (St. Martin's Griffin, 2007), this one falls short of the mark. Why alter a good thing? Reviewer: Jonatha Basye
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up—For fans of vampire literature, this book can be fun. It is a retelling of the Alcott classic with the March family as "humanitarian" vampires—they will not ingest the blood of humans. Set as the original is during the Civil War, the story follows the traditional plot. The family must survive without Mr. March, who is off at war, bolstered by his abolitionist views. Marmee is home with her four lovely daughters. They are not interested in furthering their numbers. Jo refuses to mate with Laurie, even though he desperately wants to be a vampire, too. The Marches are not shunned from society and intermingle with some ordinary humans, though there are those who would do them harm. Although vampires are supposed to live forever, a strange illness has threatened Mr. March, and Beth does eventually succumb. Thus the role of the vampire defenders becomes important, and Jo is passionate about joining their ranks. Messina has cleverly interspersed footnotes in the text to explain some past vampire accomplishment or event. The serious, scholarly tone with which they are written makes them quite humorous. The author's prose style is sharp, and her imprint on these characters is distinct. There is certainly an audience for this selection, and it may introduce readers to a classic.—Renee Steinberg, formerly at Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061976254
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/04/2010
Pages:
317
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile:
NC1260L (what's this?)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) is the author of the beloved Little Women, which was based on her own experiences growing up in New England with her parents and three sisters. More than a century after her death, Louisa May Alcott's stories continue to delight readers of all ages.

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Little Vampire Women 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why do such a thing to a classic?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think it perfectly dreadful to have nice good story like this turnes into something dark and grotesque. Little women is a great book and should not be ruined in such a way. I only gave it 1 star because it would not let me submit it otherwise. Louisa mae alcott was a dear and wrote many great books that should not be ruined in any way.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this for my booktalk. It was an amazing story and I loved it. I definently reccomend it. It is a very good book to read for school and it will win points with your teacher just for trying it. My teacher prasied me for picking this. Happy reading!
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SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
Basically the same story, with some differences here and there and has vampires. I did like it but isn't a favorite. Still, the story of the March sisters is good. If you like books with a supernatural twist such as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies then you'll like this and the book Little Women.
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dreamsofwords More than 1 year ago
This was a wonderful retelling of a classic story. The author should be praised for keeping to the classic story of little women but adding to the twist with vampires everything from Beths illness to lauries love of Jo to Mr. Marchs illness everything was explained with a vampire twist if you love the twilight series abraham Lincoln vampire hunter you will love this book.
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