Littlest Wolf

Littlest Wolf

by Larry Dane Brimner, Ariane Dewey, Jose Aruego
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The littlest wolf is worried: "I don't roll as straight as Frankie!" "I don't run as fast as Ana!" "I don't pounce as high as Tyler!" he complains.

But his father is wise. He listens to his son's concerns. He shows him what he can do. And he helps the littlest wolf realize that all is as it should be.

Larry Dane Brimner's story is heartwarming and

Overview

The littlest wolf is worried: "I don't roll as straight as Frankie!" "I don't run as fast as Ana!" "I don't pounce as high as Tyler!" he complains.

But his father is wise. He listens to his son's concerns. He shows him what he can do. And he helps the littlest wolf realize that all is as it should be.

Larry Dane Brimner's story is heartwarming and reassuring. Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey's paintings capture, with tenderness and humor, one special relationship. Together they have created a timeless celebration of fatherhood.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Shored up by simultaneously tender and zingy illustrations, Brimner's (Country Bear's Good Neighbor) tale rises above its prosaic theme to comfort children frustrated by the achievements of their older siblings. Big Gray discovers his youngest pup hiding: "Little One, why aren't you playing with your sister and brothers?" The youngster bemoans the different ways in which he is outpaced by the bigger pups: "Ana says I am a slowpoke." The father asks his pup to demonstrate, then judiciously replies, "It is true that Ana runs like the wind and you run like a soft breeze.... That is just how it should be . Running like the wind comes later." Aruego and Dewey (How Chipmunk Got His Stripes) endow each of Little One's demonstrations of his shortfalls with humor and empathy; as he runs, for instance, the artists trace his path in craggy lines of citrus colors, exhaustion oozing from his trembling physique. With his father's encouragement, the tot seems to visibly grow in strength and confidence. The narrative occasionally lumbers in its drive to edify, but the father's thoughtful replies are right on target and consistently sound genuine. Sure to give fledgling young ones a boost of confidence. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
In the manner of loving parents everywhere, Big Gray reassures his little wolf pup that he is just right for himself, even though his siblings are seemingly better at everything. They can roll in straight lines while the little wolf can only roll in zigs and zags; they run fast while little wolf "galumphes and toddles;" and they can pounce as high as the clouds. At each crisis of little wolf's confidence, Big Gray asks the little wolf to show him what he can do and then says "that is just as it should be," and the little wolf finally agrees as they curl up for a nap. Says Big Gray, "Remember the acorns, Little One. They are just as they should be. And look what they become." Dewey and Aruego make pouncing and galumphing look like fun, Big Gray looks sympathetic, but powerful next to the little but eager wolf, and the pictures share well in a group. Add this to the shelf of books with themes that encourage self-esteem, patience, and an acceptance of diversity. 2002, HarperCollins,
— Susan Hepler
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Being the smallest wolf in the pack is not easy, especially when the other pups can roll in straighter lines, pounce higher, and run faster. Big Gray comforts Little Wolf each time he compares himself to his siblings: "It is true that Ana runs like the wind and you run like a soft breeze.-That is just as it should be.-Running like the wind comes later." His father offers equally wise thoughts about Little Wolf's other concerns. When naptime comes, he tells the pup, "Remember the acorns, Little One.-They are just as they should be. And look what they become." Brimner's gentle and encouraging story will speak to those children who feel less capable or talented than their siblings. Aruego and Dewey's charming pictures perfectly portray Little Wolf's attempts to run, pounce, and jump, and imbue the characters with lots of personality. For a storyhour on self-esteem, pair this book with Robert Kraus's Leo the Late Bloomer (HarperCollins, 1971), Helen Lester's Tacky the Penguin (Houghton, 1988), or David McPhail's Something Special (Joy Street, 1988; o.p.). A great addition to any collection.-Bina Williams, Bridgeport Public Library, CT Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Like eating at a restaurant called "Mom's," there are those who avoid any children's title with the word "Littlest" in it. What a mistake that would be in this case. Brimner has written a wonderful and reassuring read-aloud, full of comfort, rhythm, and repetition. Aruego and Dewey (Weird Friends, p. 329, etc.) work their familiar magic, with waggish, big-eyed, slightly anthropomorphized animals and brilliantly patterned natural backgrounds. Big Gray (a wolf) is watching his pups, and asks Little One why he is not playing with his brothers and sisters. "Frankie said that I do not roll in a straight line," he says. And indeed, Little One zigs and zags and rolls in a line with curves. But Big Gray says, "That is just as it should be. . . . Lines without curves come later." Ana runs like the wind, and says Little One is a slowpoke. Little One runs like a soft breeze, but that too is as it should be-"Running like the wind comes later." Tyler scoffs at Little One's pounces, and Big Gray assures him that pouncing as high as the poppies is just as it should be for now. The interaction between dad and pup-Little One clambers onto his father, Big Gray places a huge claw on his son's head, and by glance and gesture the comfort in the parent's words become visible. In the end, Big Gray reminds Little One what the tiny acorn he's been fidgeting with will become. Move over, Leo the Late Bloomer, it's Little One's turn. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060290399
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/28/2002
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
400L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Larry Dane Brimner has written dozens of fiction and nonfiction books for children. His distinguished backlist includes Snowboarding, an IRA Children's Choice., and Country Bear's Good Neighbor. an ABA "Pick of the List." A classroom teacher for twenty years, Larry makes his home in San Diego.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >