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Live at the Atlanta International Pop Festival: July 3 & 5, 1970
     

Live at the Atlanta International Pop Festival: July 3 & 5, 1970

3.7 4
by The Allman Brothers Band
 
For the first time anywhere -- officially or not -- two (mostly) complete performances by the Allman Brothers at the Atlanta International Pop Festival over the Fourth of July weekend (they were the bookends of the fest) in 1970 have been issued with stellar sound, complete annotation and cool liner notes. The festival took place while the Allmans were in the process

Overview

For the first time anywhere -- officially or not -- two (mostly) complete performances by the Allman Brothers at the Atlanta International Pop Festival over the Fourth of July weekend (they were the bookends of the fest) in 1970 have been issued with stellar sound, complete annotation and cool liner notes. The festival took place while the Allmans were in the process of recording their second album, Idlewild South, when they appeared on July 3 as the hometown openers of the entire festival and proceeded to blow the minds of over 100,000 people -- for their last set on July 5 at 3:50 a.m. they performed in front of as many as 500,000. Musically, other than a somewhat stiff version of "Statesboro Blues," the July 3 set is magical. There is a stunning version of "Dreams" lasting almost ten minutes with beautiful Hammond/guitar interplay between Gregg and Dickey. Long and ferocious versions of "Whipping Post" and "Mountain Jam" are here, but the track on the July 3 set is Berry Oakley's feral vocal read of Willie Dixon's "Hoochie Coochie Man." " A short (5:49) version of this song, it has a rock & roll immediacy that is strained out of the longer versions to gain the improvisational edge. Disc one also restores Gregg Allman's "Every Hungry Woman," to its rightful place -- previously only having been available on an anthology. Harp player Thom Doucette, no stranger to ABB fans, is here aplenty, adding his righteous, stinging harp lines to many tracks on both nights. The way Gregg's organ playing is recorded here offers a new view of just how integral an anchor he was for both guitarists to play off. He is a monster musician and, even at this early date, was showing off his improvisational and rhythmic skills. Disc two is graced by the original live mixes of "Statesboro Blues" and "Whipping Post" that were released on First Great Rock Festivals of the Seventies and these are stunning for their intensity and focus, as well as clarity. "Don't Keep Me Wonderin'" is as tough a set opener as there is with the ringing slide guitars attacking one another and going for broke to kick things off. The long versions of "Stormy Monday" and "'Liz Reed" are among the most intimate and groundbreaking the band ever recorded, while "Whipping Post" transmutes itself into a jazz tune for a few minutes and changes everything. The nearly half-hour "Mountain Jam" is deepened here by the addition of a third guitarist: Johnny Winter sits in with the ABB and Doucette for the definitive version of this classic -- you can forget the one on Eat a Peach after this. While it won't replace Live at the Fillmore East as the greatest live record ever made, this is an essential purchase for ABB fans, one that gives us the treat of a dignified rendering of a very important and defining moment in the band's early career. It also provides an excellent, even mind-blowing introduction to a band that was at the peak of its power.

Editorial Reviews

Tracks - Jeff Tamarkin
This is wondrous stuff.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/21/2003
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0696998690929
catalogNumber:
86909
Rank:
33571

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Allman Brothers Band   Primary Artist
Gregg Allman   Keyboards,Hammond Organ,Vocals
Dickey Betts   Guitar
Johnny Winter   Guitar
Duane Allman   Guitar,Slide Guitar
Thom Doucette   Harmonica
Berry Oakley   Bass Guitar,Vocals
Butch Trucks   Drums,Timpani

Technical Credits

Willie Dixon   Composer
Blind Willie McTell   Composer
Gregg Allman   Composer
Dickey Betts   Composer
Donovan   Composer
T-Bone Walker   Composer
Duane Allman   Composer
Ray Colcord   Engineer
Tim Geelan   Engineer
Jaimoe   Composer
McKinley Morganfield   Composer
Muddy Waters   Composer
Berry Oakley   Composer
Russ Payne   Engineer
Joe Dan Petty   Bass Technician
Butch Trucks   Composer
William Perkins   Road Manager
Howard Fritzson   Art Direction
Jerry Rappaport   Producer
Kirk West   Producer,Essay
Red Dog   Roadie
Triana DOrazio   Packaging Manager
Harry Zerler   Engineer
Mike Callahan   Engineer
Kim Payne   Guitar Techician
Jai Johanny Johanson   Composer

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Live at the Atlanta International Pop Festival: July 3 & 5, 1970 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
glauver More than 1 year ago
If the Fillmore tapes didn't exist, this would be the Alllman Brothers' peak. As it is, those performances edge these out for top billing. This might have been a superior set had the producers taken the better takes of the numbers that are on both CDs and edited the whole into one shorter and cheaper double-disc concert. One of the complete Fillmore sets is still the place to hear the early Brothers. Unless you are a real Allman collector,this is probably not necessary.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent CD. The sound quality is incredible. Listening to it in my pickup trucks stereo I thought I heard the analog hum of the original recording master. I could clearly hear Duane Allman twisting his guitars tone and volume controls every solo, and practically hear his slide scrapping his guitars strings windings. It captures the relaxed atmosphere of the concert. The AAB is performing southern music for a southern crowd and you feel the group’s relaxed and unselfconscious, grooving hard, and has the empathy of their audience. They are at home. The recording has you in the first row. It’s almost as if you’re walking from one end of the stage to the other listening to the musicians talk to one another, tune their instruments between songs, and you’re in front of whoever is soloing. The recording is detailed. It has the introductions for both concerts and the announced interruption to the July 3rd performance of, “Mountain Jam”. For an AAB fan who owns some of their live recordings I think you’d enjoy this one. I would recommend a new AAB fan to purchase, “The Deluxe Edition of the Allman Brothers Band at Fillmore East” (2003), before purchasing this CD.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This double CD has all the orginal band members performing the Allman classics including the signature songs that made them a top jam band. Listen closely to the guitar work by Duane and Berry and the double drumming by Butch and Jamioe and of course Gregg's genius of putting it all together. This CD and the Live Fillmore Concert( also available) are the best Allman Brothers music for your collection. The band will always be known for their live work. Pick up this CD today as the band is real tight. You will listen on the way to work,at work and back at home relaxing after a tough day. Remember with the Allman band you get rock/blues and jazz! Don't wait pick it up today for an orginal American classic rock band!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Undoubtably, some of the tracks on this earlier live gig are very pleasurable renditions of their studio classics - especially when the disc two versions of Elizabeth Reed and Whipping Post take the Disc one versions and rise a notch. This is an enjoyable outing, but it really sets the stage (so to speak) for the later Live At The Fillmore concerts. You can definitely hear how they kept refining the material in prep for Fillmore. I still say the best possible rendition of Elizabeth Reed is to take the first 2 mins of the Live Fillmore version and use it as the lead in to the original studio version - WOW !!