Live at the Fillmore

Live at the Fillmore

by Tommy Castro
     
 

For the past three seasons, guitarist and singer Tommy Castro has led the house band for NBC's "Comedy Showcase," and that high-profile gig has taken him from the Bay Area bar circuit to headlining status. A rockin' high-energy performer, Castro gets right down to business on LIVE AT THE FILLMORE with the hypnotic groove of "Right as Rain" and doesn't slow down until… See more details below

Overview

For the past three seasons, guitarist and singer Tommy Castro has led the house band for NBC's "Comedy Showcase," and that high-profile gig has taken him from the Bay Area bar circuit to headlining status. A rockin' high-energy performer, Castro gets right down to business on LIVE AT THE FILLMORE with the hypnotic groove of "Right as Rain" and doesn't slow down until his howling version of "My Time After Awhile." The only other slow tune in the set is Castro's own "Just a Man," which has an early R&B feel, made all the more sensuous by the presence of organist Jimmy Pugh (of the Robert Cray Band). The set ends with Castro taking his lead from James Brown for the funky "Sex Machine."

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Michael G. Nastos
Blues-rock guitarist Castro brings us his fourth recording, an enhanced CD recorded live at his hometown, San Francisco-based Fillmore Auditorium. Castro is a good guitarist who is not hung up on pyrotechnics; he plays clean, undistorted licks in the basic tradition. Vocally, he is quite reminiscent of Tower of Power singer Emilio Castillo (check out "What Is Hip?" for the similarities.) This 11-song set starts off rocking on the straight-laced, organ-fired (by Jimmy Pugh) "Right as Rain," one of several tracks from previous discs. Castro is also into hot funk with horn help from trumpeter Tom Poole and tenor saxophonist Keith Crossan for "Like an Angel" and the 12-bar R&B-ish "Nasty Habits," all of which are Castro's tunes. "My Time After Awhile" is the most straight-blues-oriented number of the lot, slow and quietly sizzling. "Lucky in Love" and "I Got to Change" are more pop-oriented, the former in rock territory, the latter á la Otis Redding. Albert King's "Can't You See What You're Doing to Me?" is a loping blues-rock tune with Castro's best guitar improvs and most animated, feverish vocal. Even more into Otis Redding's bag, "Just a Man" is a sweet, slow soul sender, followed by the good, old-time type, midtempo, high-energy-injected rocker "Can't Keep a Good Man Down." Castro's rhythm section of bassist Randy McDonald and drummer Billy Lee Lewis finally doubles the time on the fastest tune, the typical '60s dance ditty "The Girl Can't Help It" with background vocals, and Castro exclaims, "it's not my thing, but we'll borrow it" before posing the strut of James Brown's "Sex Machine" in extended fashion for band intros and some enjoyable jamming. Every musician should put out a live club or concert date, yet few do these days. Castro's confidence is evident, his band is tight, and this CD produces a pretty good representation of what you hear in any given short set of Castro's performances. Three sets, or at least the best moments of that long night of party music, would have been even better.
Southwest Blues
Tommy Castro's star has been rising for several years now, and Live At The Fillmore is direct evidence as to why this has been the case.

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Product Details

Release Date:
02/22/2000
Label:
Blind Pig
UPC:
0019148505926
catalogNumber:
5059
Rank:
108351

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