Live Close by, Visit Often

Live Close by, Visit Often

5.0 1
by K.T. Oslin
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The funky, celebratory Memphis-style horns announcing the album's opening title track also proclaim a truly revitalized K. T. Oslin. Teaming up with a new songwriting and producer partner, Raul Malo of the Mavericks, the former '80s lady is up-to- date and then some on a collection that showcases her sharp writing and natural feel for…  See more details below

Overview

The funky, celebratory Memphis-style horns announcing the album's opening title track also proclaim a truly revitalized K. T. Oslin. Teaming up with a new songwriting and producer partner, Raul Malo of the Mavericks, the former '80s lady is up-to- date and then some on a collection that showcases her sharp writing and natural feel for blue-eyed soul and classic pop styles. That's right -- Memphis and Tin Pan Alley are the twin coordinates for the music here, and there's nary a stopover to refuel in Nashville. The insightful original songs range from dreamy, sensual blues ballads ("I Can't Remember Not Loving You," "Maybe We Should Learn to Tango") to soul struts ("Mexico Road" and the Bobbie Gentry-styled character study, "Neva Sawyer"). A fascinating bit of pop archaeology closes out the affair, as Oslin puts the hurt on a medley of three exquisite romantic numbers, capped by Cole Porter's "What Is This Thing Called Love?," and then signs off with a version of Rosemary Clooney's 1951 hit, "Come On-a My House," that's all techno blips and bleats and thoroughly modern electronic beats, with a spacey, yearning vocal floating tantalizingly above the maelstrom. Daring and unconventional, Live Close By, Visit Often is a peak moment in a career defined by bold choices.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Maria Konicki Dinoia
Describing the collection of songs on Oslin's first album in five years as diverse is an understatement. It's always nice to hear from Oslin, but this comeback is bittersweet. Too eclectic to call country, too divergent to call pop, the 12 songs on Live Close By, Visit Often are an undefinable mix of various musical styles. Perhaps it was the influence of the Mavericks' frontman, Raul Malo, who served as co-producer. Either way, music doesn't have to be definable or categorized to make it good -- or even interesting -- and Oslin's unmediated vocals are always a pleasure to listen to, no matter what she's singing about.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/19/2001
Label:
Sony Mod - Afw Line
UPC:
0078636700724
catalogNumber:
67007
Rank:
165813

Tracks

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

K.T. Oslin   Primary Artist
Dennis Burnside   Piano
Mark Casstevens   Acoustic Guitar
Jeff Coffin   Baritone Saxophone
Kim Fleming   Background Vocals
Carl Gorodetzky   Violin
Jim Grosjean   Viola
Michael Joyce   Bass
Vicki Hampton   Background Vocals
Jim Hoke   Baritone Saxophone
Raul Malo   Bass,Background Vocals
Pamela Sixfin   Violin
Glenn Worf   Bass
Bobby Blazier   Drums
Glen Caruba   Percussion
Kenny Vaughn   Electric Guitar
Vinnie Ciesielski   Trumpet
Jeff Roach   Organ
Roy Agee   Trombone
Scotty Huff   Trumpet

Technical Credits

Mike Bradley   Engineer
Michael K. Lee   Arranger,Programming,Engineer
Raul Malo   Producer
K.T. Oslin   Producer
Beth Lee   Art Direction
Scotty Huff   Horn Arrangements
Michael Lee   Engineer
Nat D. Ayer   Composer
Danny Timms   Composer

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Live Close by, Visit Often 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is another brilliant revelation in K.T. Oslin's repetoire. I wish I had picked it up in 2001 when it came out. But so many albums are clunkers these days it's hard to commit to an entire album even by your favorite artists (K.T. is certainly one of mine!). I got this album on sale but would've gladly paid the full price...IT'S THAT GOOD. Opening track, "Live Close By, Visit Often" is rousing and the end track, "Come On-A My House" has a bold, modern arrangement that works REALLY WELL on an old standard (originally done by Rosemary Clooney). It actually has an arrangement that would be considered "chill out" music today (a form of electronica music) a format that was just arriving 3 years ago when this album was released. So that track was very much ahead of it's time, then. It reminds me of Groove Armada's "At The River" which reworked Patti Page's "Old Cape Cod". Every track in between on this album is a gem. And as on all K.T. Oslin's albums and tunes...the story of each song is brought out by the warmth of K.T.'s singing. Gotta love her.