Live Close by, Visit Often

( 1 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
The funky, celebratory Memphis-style horns announcing the album's opening title track also proclaim a truly revitalized K. T. Oslin. Teaming up with a new songwriting and producer partner, Raul Malo of the Mavericks, the former '80s lady is up-to- date and then some on a collection that showcases her sharp writing and natural feel for blue-eyed soul and classic pop styles. That's right -- Memphis and Tin Pan Alley are the twin coordinates for the music here, and there's nary a stopover to refuel in Nashville. The insightful original songs range from dreamy, sensual blues ballads "I Can't Remember Not Loving You," "Maybe We Should Learn to Tango" to soul struts "Mexico ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - David McGee
The funky, celebratory Memphis-style horns announcing the album's opening title track also proclaim a truly revitalized K. T. Oslin. Teaming up with a new songwriting and producer partner, Raul Malo of the Mavericks, the former '80s lady is up-to- date and then some on a collection that showcases her sharp writing and natural feel for blue-eyed soul and classic pop styles. That's right -- Memphis and Tin Pan Alley are the twin coordinates for the music here, and there's nary a stopover to refuel in Nashville. The insightful original songs range from dreamy, sensual blues ballads "I Can't Remember Not Loving You," "Maybe We Should Learn to Tango" to soul struts "Mexico Road" and the Bobbie Gentry-styled character study, "Neva Sawyer". A fascinating bit of pop archaeology closes out the affair, as Oslin puts the hurt on a medley of three exquisite romantic numbers, capped by Cole Porter's "What Is This Thing Called Love?," and then signs off with a version of Rosemary Clooney's 1951 hit, "Come On-a My House," that's all techno blips and bleats and thoroughly modern electronic beats, with a spacey, yearning vocal floating tantalizingly above the maelstrom. Daring and unconventional, Live Close By, Visit Often is a peak moment in a career defined by bold choices.
All Music Guide - Maria Konicki Dinoia
Describing the collection of songs on Oslin's first album in five years as diverse is an understatement. It's always nice to hear from Oslin, but this comeback is bittersweet. Too eclectic to call country, too divergent to call pop, the 12 songs on Live Close By, Visit Often are an undefinable mix of various musical styles. Perhaps it was the influence of the Mavericks' frontman, Raul Malo, who served as co-producer. Either way, music doesn't have to be definable or categorized to make it good -- or even interesting -- and Oslin's unmediated vocals are always a pleasure to listen to, no matter what she's singing about.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 6/19/2001
  • Label: Sony Mod - Afw Line
  • UPC: 078636700724
  • Catalog Number: 67007
  • Sales rank: 163,082

Album Credits

Performance Credits
K.T. Oslin Primary Artist
Dennis Burnside Piano
Mark Casstevens Acoustic Guitar
Jeff Coffin Baritone Saxophone
Kim Fleming Background Vocals
Carl Gorodetzky Violin
Jim Grosjean Viola
Michael Joyce Bass
Vicki Hampton Background Vocals
Jim Hoke Baritone Saxophone
Raul Malo Bass, Background Vocals
Pamela Sixfin Violin
Glenn Worf Bass
Bobby Blazier Drums
Glen Caruba Percussion
Kenny Vaughn Electric Guitar
Vinnie Ciesielski Trumpet
Jeff Roach Organ
Roy Agee Trombone
Scotty Huff Trumpet
Technical Credits
Mike Bradley Engineer
Michael K. Lee Arranger, Programming, Engineer
Raul Malo Producer
K.T. Oslin Producer
Beth Lee Art Direction
Scotty Huff Horn Arrangements
Hank Williams Mastering
Michael Lee Engineer
Nat D. Ayer Composer
Danny Timms Composer
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Visit again & again

    This album is another brilliant revelation in K.T. Oslin's repetoire. I wish I had picked it up in 2001 when it came out. But so many albums are clunkers these days it's hard to commit to an entire album even by your favorite artists (K.T. is certainly one of mine!). I got this album on sale but would've gladly paid the full price...IT'S THAT GOOD. Opening track, "Live Close By, Visit Often" is rousing and the end track, "Come On-A My House" has a bold, modern arrangement that works REALLY WELL on an old standard (originally done by Rosemary Clooney). It actually has an arrangement that would be considered "chill out" music today (a form of electronica music) a format that was just arriving 3 years ago when this album was released. So that track was very much ahead of it's time, then. It reminds me of Groove Armada's "At The River" which reworked Patti Page's "Old Cape Cod". Every track in between on this album is a gem. And as on all K.T. Oslin's albums and tunes...the story of each song is brought out by the warmth of K.T.'s singing. Gotta love her.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews