Live & Learn

Live & Learn

by Bobby Watson
     
 

One of the strongest bop-influenced saxophonists to arise in the late 1970s, Bobby Watson has always been a player -- and leader -- to keep an eye on. An altoist with a deep, soulful sound and a composer of distinctive and accessible pieces, Watson also knows how to put a smart band together. His new unit, featuring pianist Orrin Evans and guitarist Gregg Skaff, is no… See more details below

Overview

One of the strongest bop-influenced saxophonists to arise in the late 1970s, Bobby Watson has always been a player -- and leader -- to keep an eye on. An altoist with a deep, soulful sound and a composer of distinctive and accessible pieces, Watson also knows how to put a smart band together. His new unit, featuring pianist Orrin Evans and guitarist Gregg Skaff, is no exception. It doesn�t hurt that Watson has also united once again with an old associate, the fine bassist Curtis Lundy, and that an impressive new drummer, Montez Coleman, has been incorporated into the fold as well. With this powerhouse unit behind him, Watson turns in one of his most compelling recordings in years, personally sounding as vital and inventive (on soprano saxophone as well as alto) as he�s ever been. The up-tempo tunes move like the wind, but the slower work is just as arresting. Don�t miss �River Jordan,� a stirring ballad rendered as a duet between Watson and a sensitive and responsive Skaff.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - David R. Adler
Live & Learn, Bobby Watson's Palmetto debut, is an engaging quintet disc featuring Orrin Evans on piano, Greg Skaff on guitar, old friend Curtis Lundy on bass, and up and comer Montez Coleman on drums. It's a high-spirited record, melding hard bop ("River Jordan," Pamela Watson's "Stanky P," Dawn Warren's "Why Not") with more soul-tinged sounds ("We Fall Down," "Live & Learn"). Skaff's guitar gives the session much of that contemporary bite. The instrument isn't terribly common in mainstream small-group settings, but Watson, to his credit, uses it to set his music apart in a variety of ways. He duets with Skaff on the mournful "Postlude"; Skaff then switches to acoustic for the effective WTC tribute "Landmarks Lost." On the traditional "Thank You," by contrast, Watson blows freely over a hot swing vamp, backed only by Lundy and Coleman. ("Give me what I need!" he tells the rhythm section at the start of the take.) To wrap up, Watson turns up the heat in 12/8 on the Sammy Davis, Jr. vehicle "I've Gotta Be Me." Passionate and accessible, Watson's music deserves wider recognition, and Palmetto's stature as a strong jazz indie can only help.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/28/2002
Label:
Palmetto Records
UPC:
0753957208325
catalogNumber:
2083
Rank:
386950

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