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Live to Air
     

Live to Air

4.3 3
by Jeffrey L. Diamond
 

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Television, politics, and the Russian mob: Live to Air

is a riveting crime thriller, jam-packed with intrigue

and unforgettable characters.

Ethan Benson is a charming and principled-if sometimes

difficult-television producer in New York City who detests doing

crime stories. But that's of no significance to his high-powered

boss at the

Overview

Television, politics, and the Russian mob: Live to Air

is a riveting crime thriller, jam-packed with intrigue

and unforgettable characters.

Ethan Benson is a charming and principled-if sometimes

difficult-television producer in New York City who detests doing

crime stories. But that's of no significance to his high-powered

boss at the network, and Benson finds himself assigned to investigating

a bloody shoot-out in the Meatpacking District, whose old

grime and new glitz provide a symbolic background for a sensational

murder that has dominated the headlines.

As he pieces together his story, Benson literally covers New

York-from Central Park and Fifth Avenue to Little Russia in Brooklyn

and Rikers Island in Queens-crossing paths with a fascinating

cast of characters on both sides of the law. Unknown to Benson,

organized crime may be only one facet of the thrilling investigation.

With his wife and son in hiding and his life in danger, Benson

draws closer to a resolution that will have explosive results for

the criminals-and for some members of New York City's political

elite as well.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781632990310
Publisher:
Greenleaf Book Group, LLC
Publication date:
04/29/2015
Pages:
404
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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Live to Air 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Toodles4 More than 1 year ago
NO SPOILERS ‘Live to Air’ is an engaging novel that exposes the author very quickly as one who is adept at creating visual scenes. In fact, as one reads, the city of New York and its lifestyle become intrinsic parts of another one of its characters from its grubby meat packing district to its tonier condos, flashier offices, Brooklyn, and the classy Hamptons. At the sane time, we meet characters who inhabit these areas from the bottom up: the Russian mafia and its associates, the assorted TV media people, the politicians and so-called movers and shakers of the city’s internal workings. The plot centers around a drug deal gone bad and the body of the deputy mayor’s daughter Cynthia, who is found shot near the scene. It would be so easy to blame Pavel Feodor, a known criminal who is also found wounded at the scene. But why do the known facts not support his guilt? Ethan Benson, assigned to produce a TV show against his will, is drawn into finding out the answers. As the story unfolds, we learn a lot about the law, corruption, and how to make a successful movie production. Diamond attempts to develop characters well for the most part, but the greatest problem is finding his dialogue believable. Almost every character from every level in life and education speaks in the same manner, and I find it difficult to believe that so any people from the main character Ethan to his wife Sarah, the deputy mayor Jameson and just about everyone else is incapable of finishing words properly: we read “gonna”, “wanna” , and “lemme” to such an extent that this reader finds it annoying and intrusive. In my opinion, when the dialogue peculiarities take over and interfere, there is a problem. Most experienced writers know it’s almost impossible to write consistently in a dialect and not lose the reader’s interest, just as it is very difficult to write well using an age-appropriate child’s dialogue. In addition to this, the dialogue of the Russian thugs becomes laughable as it resembles a Grade F movie and if you close your eyes, could be uttered by early Hollywood’s idea of a native American Indian in an old-fashioned ‘oater’. “You no worry, (Kemosabi) I take care of problem.” And then, this almost monosyllabic cretin says, “Wake up Yuri. Get him into thicket.” Thicket? How likely is he to say that rather than “Drag him into the bushes”? Then take Ethan’s wife Sarah: how many warm and fuzzy, caring mothers refer to their children as “little man”? Diamond seems to have an affair with adverbs. His people rarely just speak without a qualifier: Ethan is “transfixed” (by his own words) as he speaks with Peter Sampson; “Summers said forthrightly”. When Diamond does a more rapid, clipped speech exchange the plot moves along at a better pace. This, to me, is the job of a good editor, to make sure the author does not fall in love with his own words and cripple his characters with them. As an ex-news person, I realize the value of sources but found Ms. Templeton too informative and coincidentally useful with little reason. In some cases, the ‘good’ people were simply too angelic and the bad guys were Satan personified, an aspect that can make a serious novel turn comedic. I felt the tension created throughout the book dissipated somewhat at the end as the Russians slinked off into the sunset -- perhaps to return in a sequel? I’m not too sure I ever really understood the full impact of their dirty
denise66 More than 1 year ago
gaylelin More than 1 year ago
I received a free copy of this book from the Greenleaf Book Group in return for a review. Ethan Benson yearns for good old-fashioned journalism. Social media has slowed down interest in such television shows, and the top dog has given the crime department to Ethan. He detests working the crime desk. That is, until he has a case that will ultimately lead to the most watched show in the history of the huge communications company. Be prepared; it won't be necessary to allow so many pages in order for the book to interest you to the point that you'll continue to read. It will grab you by the throat from the first page and shake you like a pit bull would. It won't let go until you've finished the last page, and even then will haunt your mind. The case involves a bad boy who supposedly confessed to being responsible for the shooting death of the daughter of the deputy mayor of New York City. Now that Bad Boy has been tried and convicted, the powers that be are trying to reinstate the death penalty just for this case. As Ethan begins to put together a show in which people related to the case will answer an interviewer's questions, Bad Boy even agrees to take part, and he tells Ethan he has no memory of even seeing the girl during the shooting incident. This information along with crime scene photos, Ethan becomes more determined to see the show through to airing. This tale has twists and turns that will keep you wide awake and maybe on the edge of your seat. Everywhere there is danger for Ethan; anything to keep such a show of being aired. Corruption is rampant in the government: the police department, the DA's office. There is deep involvement with the city's Russian mafia. This is touted as being the first in a series of Ethan Benson books. Bring on the next one; I'm ready. I couldn't put this one down and read it all in one day. When will the movie be released? No movie, you say? Well, there should be. Without hesitation, I give this book five stars.
JT1969 More than 1 year ago
This book follows Ethan Benson, a TV producer as he prepares a crime story to air on TV. The story involves the death of the NYC deputy mayor's daughter and the Russian Mob. I enjoyed reading about the process of gathering information and the various interviews. The author did a nice job wrapping up the plot with a "live broadcast." I felt the family scenes for the main character were a bit stiff, but liked the Ocean Parkway scene. Thanks to the Greenleaf Book Group for a copy of this book!