Uriah Heep Live

Uriah Heep Live

5.0 2
by Uriah Heep
     
 

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After scoring back-to-back album hits with Demons and Wizards and The Magician's Birthday, Uriah Heep had suddenly become a major attraction in the world of rock & roll. They capitalized on their newfound popularity with extensive touring and, since they lacked the time in their schedule to knock out a new studio album, their

Overview

After scoring back-to-back album hits with Demons and Wizards and The Magician's Birthday, Uriah Heep had suddenly become a major attraction in the world of rock & roll. They capitalized on their newfound popularity with extensive touring and, since they lacked the time in their schedule to knock out a new studio album, their label decided they should release a live album to fill the gap. The result was Live: January 1973, the definitive live recording of the classic Uriah Heep lineup and a good indication of what made the group so popular among heavy metal fans during their heyday. The set list represents all the highlights of their albums up to the point, and everything is delivered with maximum energy before an enthusiastic Birmingham, England, crowd. Of course, uptempo rockers like "Traveller in Time" and "Love Machine" become especially muscular in this setting, but the big surprise is the way the slower tunes are affected. For instance, "July Morning" gains a new, profound level of emotional power as the band shifts from pastoral verses backed only by Ken Hensley's organ riffs to a stirring chorus where the band members give their all before giving way to some powerful instrumental jamming. The band also pays tribute to its roots at the end, with an entertaining medley of classic rockers like "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Blue Suede Shoes." Unfortunately, Live: January 1973 is also prone to the bombast and self-indulgent soloing usually present on double live albums: The big culprit in this area is "Gypsy," a rocker that is padded out to over twice its studio lengthy with lengthy instrumental solos that were probably more impressive in the live setting than they are on record. However, the group makes up for this deficiency by supplying a surprisingly sturdy set of tunes and delivering a totally committed performance throughout. In the end, Live: January 1973 probably won't win over any new converts to the Uriah Heep cause, but it is a solid listen for the group's fans.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/03/1989
Label:
Mercury
UPC:
0042282279026
catalogNumber:
822790

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Uriah Heep   Primary Artist
David Byron   Vocals
Ken Hensley   Organ,Keyboards,Vocals
Mick Box   Guitar,Vocals
Lee Kerslake   Drums,Vocals
Gary Thain   Bass,Bass Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

Rick Brand   Engineer
Gerry Bron   Producer
Todd Fisher   Equipment Manager
Peter Gallen   Engineer
Ashley Howe   Engineer
Del Roll   Equipment Manager
Basil Marshall   Equipment Manager
Neville Crozier   Engineer
Alan Perkins   Engineer
Geoff Brown   Liner Notes,Sleeve Notes
Lillian Bron   Sleeve Coordinator

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Uriah Heep Live 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I remember sneaking into my sisters room to listen to ANYTHING! On her turntable was side 4 of "Live January '73. I didn't know what to expect so I turned it up to 3, dropped the needle & sat in front of the speakers. Within one minute I was standing, clapping, & the volume was now on 7! "Look at Yourself", is the first song on side 4 and it's everything I crave in a rock song. The audience is involved throughout this song as well as the entire lp. "Are you all still clapping?" is what David Byron screams out toward the end of the song. YES they were! It's just not this cut but everything on this lp is close to masterpiece. The guitars are strong & very wah-ha-happy. Mick Box in my opinion is the unsung King of the wah pedal. Ken Hensley is all muscle on his Hammond organ, Moog "simplifier", 2nd guitar, & vocals. The rhythm section of Gary Thain on bass & Lee Kerslake on drums is a duo I would build any band upon. They were a key selling point to U.H.'s music at that time. Kerslake went on to play on Ozzy's first 2 solo lp's. Anybody with sense knows that's his intro to "Over the Mountain" reguardless what the lp credit says. Don't believe me yet? Listen to his drum solo in "Gypsy" on the "Live '73" and guess again! The rock & roll medley truly ices this cake. I bet some of the old masters wish they'd have did it like Uriah Heep did it. Loud, solid, & full of guts! You've nothing to lose. This is a genuine bite of English metal as rock history was being made. Join me for tea?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago