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The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers
     

The Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers

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by Diogenes Laertius
 

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Very little is known about Diogenes Laertius, despite the fact he wrote some of the most influential accounts of the lives of the West’s best known philosophers. His mention of Sextus Empiricus means he lived after the 3rd century A.D., while Sopater quoted him in the 6th century. For that reason, historians believe he lived in the middle of the 4th

Overview

Very little is known about Diogenes Laertius, despite the fact he wrote some of the most influential accounts of the lives of the West’s best known philosophers. His mention of Sextus Empiricus means he lived after the 3rd century A.D., while Sopater quoted him in the 6th century. For that reason, historians believe he lived in the middle of the 4th century. 
 
In the ancient manuscripts of his work, he is invariably referred to as “Laertius Diogenes,” thus giving the author his name. It’s unclear what the origin of his name is either, but his Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers was written in Greek and professes to give an account of the lives and sayings of the Greek philosophers. 
 
The Lives has been one of the chief accounts of the philosophers’ lives, partly because other documents no longer exist, leaving Laertius as one of the few comprehensive accounts available. Even still, it’s not clear that Laertius’ entire work survived the Middle Ages; 14th century discussions of his work suggest there was a lot more than currently exists today. 
 
Regardless, the Lives are one of the best ways for today’s readers to understand the lives of famous ancient philosophers, such as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Xenophon, and over 70 others.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940025603566
Publisher:
George Bell & Sons
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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in the city of the Prieneans, then we ourselves will come thither and settle near you. LIFE OF SOLON. I. Solon the son of Execestides, a native of Salamis, was the first person who introduced among the Athenians, an ordinance for the lowering of debts; for this was the name given to the release of the bodies and possessions of the debtors. For men used to borrow on the security of their own persons, and many became slaves in consequence of their inability to pay; and as seven talents were owed to him as a part of his paternal inheritance when he succeeded to it, he was the first person who made a composition with his debtors, and who exhorted the other men who had money owing to them to do likewise, and this ordinance was called enadna; and the reason why is plain. After that he enacted his other laws, which it would take a long time to enumerate; and he wrote them on wooden revolving tablets. II. But what was his most important act of all was, when there had been a great dispute about his native land Salamis, between the Athenians and Megarians, and when the Athenians had met with many disasters in war, and had passed a decree that if any one proposed to the people to go to war for the sake of Salamis lie should be punished with death, he then pretended to be mad and putting on a crown rushed into the market place, and there he recited to the Athenians by the agency of a crier, the elegies which he had composed, and which were all directed to the subject of Salamis, and by these means he excited them; and so they made war again upon the Megarians and conquered them by means of Solon. And the elegies which had the greatest influence on the Athenians were these: Would that Iwere a man of Pholegandros,t Or small Sicinna,J rather than of Athens : Vide Thirlwall, ...

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The Lives And Opinions Of Eminent Philosophers 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For anyone's information, this appears to be the translation of C. D. Yonge. Unlike some of Nook's other ebooks of the same work, which are pure garbage, this book appears to contain an intact text, although the footnote numbers are in a bad format.