Lives of a Cell: Notes of a Biology Watcher

Overview

Elegant, suggestive, and clarifying, Lewis Thomas's profoundly humane vision explores the world around us and examines the complex interdependence of all things.  Extending beyond the usual limitations of biological science and into a vast and wondrous world of hidden relationships, this provocative book explores in personal, poetic essays to topics such as computers, germs, language, music, death, insects, and medicine.  Lewis Thomas writes, "Once you have become permanently startled, as I am, by the ...

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Overview

Elegant, suggestive, and clarifying, Lewis Thomas's profoundly humane vision explores the world around us and examines the complex interdependence of all things.  Extending beyond the usual limitations of biological science and into a vast and wondrous world of hidden relationships, this provocative book explores in personal, poetic essays to topics such as computers, germs, language, music, death, insects, and medicine.  Lewis Thomas writes, "Once you have become permanently startled, as I am, by the realization that we are a social species, you tend to keep an eye out for the pieces of evidence that this is, by and large, good for us."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140047431
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/28/1978
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 160
  • Sales rank: 138,835
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.78 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Table of Contents

The Lives of a Cell Thoughts for a Countdown On Societies as Organisms A Fear of Pheromones The Music of This Sphere An Earnest Proposal The Technology of Medicine Vibes Ceti The Long Habit Antaeus in Manhattan The MBL Autonomy Organelles as Organisms Germs Your Very Good Health Social Talk Information Death in the Open Natural Science Natural Man The Iks Computers The Planning of Science Some Biomythology On Various Words Living Language On Probability and Possibility The World's Biggest Membranes Reference Notes

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2000

    An expert discovers beauty

    A science classic by an expert in cell biology who has come to a point in his life where he does not need to analyze and categorize and hypothesize, but merely reflects on the majesty and beauty of what we so often take for granted all around us.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2000

    humans are like ants, but ants are not like humans;

    one of the many thought provoking obsevations of Lewis Thomas. this book was fascinating for me not because of the scientific information provided, but because of the literary stlye used. Thomas has several underlying themes throughout the book, linking all the essays together. His observations of human behavior and the many ways the word 'cell' is interpreted makes the book worth reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2005

    incredible.

    this collection of essays focuses heavily on the unity inherent in biology. thomas has a knack for getting his points across with some of the most beautiful prose i have ever read, and his ability to make sense of the abstract and apply it to every level of biology implies much about nature. a 'must read'

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2004

    only good if you like bio!!

    i was forced to read it for class and it took me 2 months!! but then again im horrible at biology so maybe thats why i didnt like it. anyways i think that if for some odd reason you like reading about science for fun then you should try this book. but dont say i didnt warn ya...

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2010

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