Lives of John Lennon: A Biography

Lives of John Lennon: A Biography

3.0 5
by Albert Goldman

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For those who hated him, and those who will read anything about him, the sordid, sensationalist truth that behind the public image was a drug addict, wife beater, cut-throat competitor, and insecure little boy. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (

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Random House Publishing Group
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Lives of John Lennon 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Sosohappy 10 months ago
A work of hate by a writer who hated rock-n-roll. Many better biographies of John Lennon have been written. Look for the books about Lennon written by Tim Riley, Ray Coleman and his ex-wife Cynthia for a better more diverse read. They are better than this one dimensional mean spirited literary attack.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Why is the Spanish language version of this available on the Nook and not the English? Why not make both version available? Makes no sense.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A difficult book to judge. Lennon was probably the best song-writer of his day and that is what we remember him for, but reading this book the man himself appears to be a self-centered, vain, insecure, and unpleasant individual. The author clearly is an admirer of Lennon's music, less so of the man, and the excesses of the '60's. He has little sympathy for Yoko Ono, who, he suggests was little more than a bad influence - one that John needed though, due to his inability to function without someone to take control of his life and guide him, for good or bad. The best thing I can say about this book is that it is a useful antidote to all those aging 1960's types who look back at the most trashy, superficial decade of the 20th century fondly, and still perceive Lennon to be some kind of visionary. If even half the things written here are true, then those people really should think again about themselves and their heroes. More and more Lennon does appear to be little more than a product of his time, and as such, inconsequential beyond purely historical interest.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not the most accurate book about John Lennon (let alone one of the most shocking retellings of his life) yet the book is highly accessible and a fun read. The book goes in depth on many aspects of the Lennon/Beatles phenomenon. The bio mentions several girlfriends of John¿s, one who was Asian ---this one was before 1968. The book also describes the infamous Lennon-Epstein ¿thing¿ in scandalizing detail. Some aspects of the bio had me shocked, literally gaping; still I brushed these statements aside and (as I read on) became entertained by what to author was telling. Yes there was a big controversy over the fact that Goldman was not giving us the facts and turning the facts into fiction; still, most information in the rock and roll world are tinged with rumors. If you¿re looking for a true story, read several Lennon bios and decide for yourself. So, take it with a grain of salt and just enjoy this book regardless of its flaws.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book back in 1989 when it was released and got a lot of flack from Lennon fans..I was disturbed by its content back then...but as years have passed and more Lennon biographies came out I now believe everything in Goldmans book...maybe enough time has passed to face the truth...I loved John and can except him for the tortured soul he was. To many books have been written that coinside with Goldmans story...