The Lives of the Muses: Nine Women and the Artists They Inspired

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"In this new book, Francine Prose explores the complex relationship between the artist and his muse. In so doing, she illuminates with great sensitivity and intelligence the elusive emotional wellsprings of the creative process." "There is no ideal muse, but rather as many variations on the theme as there are individual women who have had the luck, or misfortune, to find their destiny conjoined with that of a particular artist. What are we to make of the relationship between the child Alice Liddell, who inspired Alice in Wonderland, and the ...
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Overview

"In this new book, Francine Prose explores the complex relationship between the artist and his muse. In so doing, she illuminates with great sensitivity and intelligence the elusive emotional wellsprings of the creative process." "There is no ideal muse, but rather as many variations on the theme as there are individual women who have had the luck, or misfortune, to find their destiny conjoined with that of a particular artist. What are we to make of the relationship between the child Alice Liddell, who inspired Alice in Wonderland, and the Oxford don who became Lewis Carroll? Or the so-called serial muse, Lou Andreas-Salome, who captivated Nietzsche, Rilke, and Freud - as impressive a list as any muse can boast? Salvador Dali was the only artist to sign his art with his muse's name, and Gala Dali certainly knew how to market her artist and his work while simultaneously burnishing her own image and celebrity." Lou, Gala, and Yoko Ono all defy the feminist stereotype of the muse as a passive beauty put on a pedestal and oppressed by a male artist. However, it's rare to find an artist and muse who are genuine partners, true collaborators, such as ballerina Suzanne Farrell and choreographer George Balanchine.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
In the classical world, the muses -- all nine of them -- were daughters of Zeus who inspired poets, musicians, and other creative types to produce works of genius. Today, says Francine Prose, the word has been weakened and is used almost exclusively to refer to the chic women who help fashion designers inform their latest lines. But in her scholarly account, Prose (a National Book Award finalist for her novel Blue Angel) presents nine real women who moved men to greatness and who were not mere catalysts but worthy of note on their own, in many cases deserving a share of the credit for the work they helped create.

Each chapter is a mini-biography of a woman's life and the way a male artist figured into it. We see the muse as prompter and creator in her own regard, like memoirist Hester Thrale, whose letters to Samuel Johnson helped form his later works. In Alice Liddell, the inspiration for Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, the muse is at her most passive, asserting her independence of the child-loving author only by failing to remain seven years old forever. And with Yoko Ono, there is the muse as artist in her own right, who claimed not to have heard of the Beatles before meeting John Lennon, and whose avant-garde tendencies some blamed for his musical downfall.

To hit the mystical nine, Prose stretches a bit. For every Suzanne Farrell collaborating on ballets with George Balanchine, or every Gala Dalí cosigning canvases with spouse Salvador, there are personae only a graduate student would be likely to know. We learn of "serial muse" Lou Andreas-Salomé's involvement with Friedrich Nietzsche, Rainer Maria Rilke, and Sigmund Freud, and of how Charis Weston had to vie with a toilet for the attentions of her photographer husband, Edward. But these lesser-knowns help make the book a complete analysis of notable women who motivated men of achievement -- usually at the expense of their own -- and lived with the consequences. Katherine Hottinger

The New Yorker
"She is either Muse or she is nothing," Robert Graves wrote. After the Renaissance, the Greek goddesses of artistic inspiration were replaced by real -- if idealized -- women (think Dante and Beatrice). In these well-researched essays, Prose examines the lives of nine women who inspired some of history's most prominent artists and writers, including Samuel Johnson, Man Ray, and John Lennon. Nearly all these muse-artist relationships were distinguished by tragedy, and only five were sexually consummated; as Prose notes, "The power of longing is more durable than the thrill of possession." What emerges by the end of the book, oddly, is a case for the singularity of artistic influence: the author shows that Lewis Carroll's attachment to Alice Liddell was not at all like Nietzsche's sense of intellectual kinship with Lou Andreas-Salomé, nor was Yoko Ono's involvement with John Lennon as fruitful as Suzanne Farrell's with George Balanchine. The strongest essays here, on Liddell, Farrell, Ono, and Lee Miller (a Vogue model and photographer who posed for and worked with Man Ray), pointedly refute the notion that the role of the muse is a passive one, and offer in its place a complicated vision of the necessary contradictions of artistic life -- including the desire for both feverish devotion and artistic independence, and a sense of the truth of beauty and the transience of it. Prose's broader conclusions about culture can seem hasty, but the book's achievement is its quiet reëvaluation of the received notion that genius is solitary in nature.
Publishers Weekly
"I have never seen you without thinking that I should like to pray to you," says the poet Rilke. The object of his devotion is the astonishing Lou Andreas-Salom the woman who played muse not only to Rilke, but also to Nietzsche and Freud. The idea of the muse seems an initially quaint, if not flatly sexist charge. Acclaimed novelist Prose (Blue Angel, etc.) confronts that honestly when she asks: "Doesn't the idea of the Muse reinforce the destructive stereotype of the creative, productive, active male and of the passive female?" Politically incorrect or not, the muses, as Prose presents them, genuinely "illumine and deepen the mysteries of Eros and creativity, as each Muse redraws the border between the human and the divine." In nine biographical narratives, Prose examines a range of relationships between artists and the women who gave them their divine spark. Though the artists, among them Lewis Carroll, Salvador Dal! and John Lennon, can easily be viewed through the lens of obsessional pathology, Prose makes a remarkable case for the exceptionality of these women in their own right. Lee Miller for example was not merely the muse to Man Ray, but an accomplished photographer, and Suzanne Farrell, Balanchine's muse, a virtuosic ballerina. Prose's project is to probe the mystery of inspiration, not to solve it once and for all: "one difference between magic and art is that magic can be explained." From Samuel Johnson's caretaker and trusted friend Hester Thrale to Dali's wife, Gala, Prose demonstrates the strength and unique quality of influence each muse had on her artist. (Sept. 20)
Library Journal
A noted novelist turns to nonfiction to explore the concept of the muse, showing that women from Gala Dali to Lou Andreas-Salome and Suzanne Farrell were not passive recipients of male regard but powerful in their own right. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Astute cultural history examining the role that nine women played in the lives of male artists who obsessed over them. Prose's first book-length piece of nonfiction delivers on a subject she's written about so well in her novels (Blue Angel, 2000, etc.): the power of women to live outside convention, often by capitalizing on their position as the objects of men's desire. From Alice Liddell, who asked Lewis Carroll to tell her a story one summer afternoon, to Yoko Ono, who moved John Lennon to embrace politics, the muse is still a potent force, writes the author. Her subjects often received short shrift, however; they were perceived either as inanimate objects, a perspective that belied their power while playing into feminist theories of domination, or as destructive parasites exploiting the artists they motivated. In a refreshing twist, Prose argues that the women she chooses to redeem from history's dustbin were more often cagey types themselves, motivated by love of art. They used relationships with artists to rescue themselves from the boredom of middle-class housewifery and to indulge in their own intellectual pursuits. In short, they became friends with artists because they were artists. The weakness of men is another theme here. Samuel Johnson needed Hester Thrale; he simply couldn't take care of himself and for years lived with Thrale and her husband because no one else would tell him to change his clothes. Lewis Carroll had his issues with young girls. Nietzsche, for all his talk of supermen, was unable to muster a mature stance toward Lou Andreas-Salome: he loved her but didn't want to admit it. Thrale and Salome are good examples of Prose's kind of muse: when their artistsbecame too constrictive they moved on, often to true love, and wound up writing books of their own. An excellent companion to studies of the men included here, and a wonderful work of revisionist biography on its own.
Maureen Corrigan
“Rollicking … Almost too much fun to read.”
Time Magazine
"A supple work of cultural history."
Time magazine
“A supple work of cultural history.”
Newsweek
“Sad, glamorous and entirely riveting.”
Los Angeles Times Book Review
“Juicy reading …. a thoroughly researched, highly opinionated series of fascinating double biographies.”
Art News
“Prose taps into the power of nine in this inspired book.”
Atlanta Journal Constitution
“Smooth smart and altogether engaging.”
Book Forum
“Exceptionally well researched … an elegant study.”
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“With elegance, eloquence and majesty, Prose has give us a glimpse of the tangled webs of art and Eros.”
Wall Street Journal
“A wonderful combination of argument and literary portraiture.”
Columbus Dispatch
“Packed with fascinating details.”
San Francisco Chronicle Book Review
“Prose has done a great service in her just reconsideration of the rather strange, complicated role of the muse.”
Gotham Magazine
“Richly drawn … Prose approaches the artist-muse relationship with respect and wonder.”
Washington Post Book World
“Entertaining … Prose’s indignation, intelligence, scorching wit and critical insight have full play.”
Entertainment Weekly
“Lively and compassionate”
Minneapolis Star Tribune
“A remarkable book...piquant, intelligent, provocative--and sometimes haunting.”
San Francisco Chronicle
“Francine Prose humanizes nine women who, in some cases, have been idealized beyond recognition. Hurrah for real women.”
USA Today
“Stylish writing … a clear-eyed view .. cherry-picked examples.”
Atlanta Journal & Constitution
"Smooth smart and altogether engaging."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060196721
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/17/2002
  • Pages: 432
  • Product dimensions: 5.62 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Francine Prose

Francine Prose is the critically acclaimed author of nineteen novels, including the National Book Award Finalist Blue Angel and My New American Life. She has written three other novels for young adults: After, winner of the California Young Reader Medal, an IRA/CBC Young Adults' Choice, and a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age; Bullyville, a PW Best Book and Book Sense Children's Pick; and her most recent, Touch. She is also the author of two picture books, Leopold, the Liar of Leipzig and Rhino, Rhino, Sweet Potato. The recipient of numerous grants and honors, including a Guggenheim and a Fulbright, Francine Prose was Director's Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. She lives in New York City.

Biography

When it comes to an author as eclectic as Francine Prose, it's difficult to find the unifying thread in her work. But, if one were to examine her entire oeuvre—from novels and short stories to essays and criticism—a love of reading would seem to be the animating force. That may not seem extraordinary, especially for a writer, but Prose is uncommonly passionate about the link between reading and writing. "I've always read," she confessed in a 1998 interview with Atlantic Unbound. "I started when I was four years old and just didn't stop…The only reason I wanted to be a writer was because I was such an avid reader." (In 2006, she produced an entire book on the subject—a nuts-and-bolts primer entitled Reading Like a Writer, in which she uses excerpts from classic and contemporary literature to illustrate her personal notions of literary excellence.)

If Prose is specific about the kind of writing she, herself, likes to read, she's equally voluble about what puts her off. She is particularly vexed by "obvious, tired clichés; lazy, ungrammatical writing; implausible plot turns." Unsurprisingly, all of these are notably absent in her own work. Even when she explores tried-and-true literary conventions—such as the illicit romantic relationship at the heart of her best known novel, Blue Angel—she livens them with wit and irony. She even borrowed her title from the famous Josef von Sternberg film dealing with a similar subject.

As biting and clever as she is, Prose cringes whenever her work is referred to as satire. She explained to Barnes & Noble.com, "Satirical to me means one-dimensional characters…whereas, I think of myself as a novelist who happens to be funny—who's writing characters that are as rounded and artfully developed as the writers of tragic novels."

Prose's assessment of her own work is pretty accurate. Although her subject matter is often ripe for satire (religious fanaticism in Household Saints, tabloid journalism in Bigfoot Dreams, upper-class pretensions in Primitive People), etc.), she takes care to invest her characters with humanity and approaches them with respect. "I really do love my characters," she says, "but I feel that I want to take a very hard look at them. I don't find them guilty of anything I'm not guilty of myself."

Best known for her fiction, Prose has also written literary criticism for The New York Times, art criticism for The Wall Street Journal, and children's books based on Jewish folklore, all of it infused with her alchemic blend of humor, insight,and intelligence.

Good To Know

Prose rarely wastes an idea. In Blue Angel, the novel that the character Angela is writing is actually a discarded novel that Prose started before stopping because, in her own words, "it seemed so juvenile to me."

While she once had no problem slamming a book in one of her literary critiques, these days Prose has resolved to only review books that she actually likes. The ones that don't adhere to her high standards are simply returned to the senders.

Prose's novel Household Saints was adapted into an excellent film starring Tracey Ullman, Vincent D'Onofrio, and Lili Taylor in 1993.

Another novel, The Glorious Ones, was adapted into a musical.

In 2002, Prose published The Lives of the Muses, an intriguing hybrid of biography, philosophy, and gender studies that examines nine women who inspired famous artists and thinkers—from John Lennon's wife Yoko Ono to Alice Liddell, the child who enchanted Lewis Carroll.

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    1. Hometown:
      New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 1, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      Brooklyn, New York
    1. Education:
      B.A., Radcliffe College, 1968

Read an Excerpt

Hester Thrale

On a spring morning in 1766, Henry and Hester Thrale visited Dr. Samuel Johnson in his rooms at Johnson's Court.

The lively, attractive young couple had known the famous writer since 1764, when the playwright Arthur Murphy had brought Johnson to dinner at the Thrales' estate in Streatham Park, a few miles from central London. Since then, he had been a regular guest at Streatham, and at the Thrales' city place in Southwark, on the grounds of their profitable brewery. But lately, Johnson's visits had tapered off, and the Thrales had reason to suspect that he was suffering from one of the profound and terrifying fits of melancholia that had plagued him for most of his fifty-seven years. Already, they had grown close enough for Johnson to have confided his fears about "the horrible condition of his mind, which he said was nearly distracted."

Unlikely on the surface, the friendship was a tremendous coup for the socially ambitious Thrales. Johnson was famous not only for having written the Dictionary, the Rambler essays, The Life of Savage, and Rasselas but for his witty conversation. Among fashionable Londoners, watching the doctor talk had become a sort of spectator sport; at parties, guests crowded, four and five deep, around his chair to listen.

Johnson brought his own celebrity talking-and-sparring partners -- David Garrick, Oliver Goldsmith, Sir Joshua Reynolds -- along with him to Streatham, possibly because brisk repartee was not his host's strong suit. Well meaning and personable, properly insistent on his masculine right to overeat, hunt, and cheat publicly on his wife, Henry Thrale lacked,according to Johnson, the finer social skills. "His conversation does not show the minute hand; but he strikes the hour very correctly." He was the sort of rich, dull, solid fellow -- "such dead, though excellent, mutton," to quote Virginia Woolf's wicked assessment of Rebecca West's husband -- who turns up, with surprising frequency, in the lives of the muses.

Johnson liked the wealthy brewer; he admired the manly way he ran his household, and enjoyed the benefits of his expensive tastes in food and wine. Driven by an increasing horror of solitude and a craving for human companionship, the writer was drawn to the vibrant domesticity of Streatham, and especially to his hostess, a slight, dark-eyed Welsh fireball, who was disputatious, flirtatious, quick, well educated, and (unlike many of their contemporaries) unafraid of a man whom she described as having "a roughness in his manner which subdued the saucy and terrified the meek; this was, when I knew him, the prominent part of a character which few durst venture to approach so nearly."

Chroniclers of the period record the sparkling sorties that flew back and forth across the table between Samuel Johnson and Mrs. Thrale. And her own Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson, LL.D., published in 1785, functions as a compendium not only of the writer's witticisms, but also of their exchanges on subjects ranging from faith to incredulity, from ghostly apparitions to the value of everyday knowledge, from marital discord to convent life, from the pleasures of traveling by coach to the rewards of reading Don Quixote, from the correct way to raise children to the necessity of constantly measuring one's minor complaints against the greater sufferings and privations of the poor.

The Thrales were tolerant of the writer's notorious eccentricities. Eventually, they would assign a servant to stand outside his door with a fresh wig for him to wear to dinner, since he so often singed the front of his wig by reading too close to the lamp. Nearly blind, disfigured by pockmarks, Johnson suffered from scrofula and a host of somatic complaints, as well as an array of psychological symptoms that, today, would virtually ensure that he was medicated for Tourette's, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, to name just the obvious syndromes. (The ongoing discussion of Johnson's "case" in medical literature has made him one of those figures, like Van Gogh and Lizzie Siddal, whose health care improved dramatically after death.) Happily, Samuel Johnson's own more permissive era was sufficiently enchanted by his intelligence, humor, and unflagging energy to overlook his rocking from foot to foot, mumbling, twitching, emitting startling verbal outbursts, obsessively counting his footsteps, touching each lamppost in the street, and performing an elaborate shuffle before he could enter a doorway.

The Thrales were used to the doctor's tics. Yet nothing could have prepared them for the scene they found on that May morning when at last they were admitted to the writer's rooms at Johnson's Court. His friend John Delap was just leaving, and it must have been instantly obvious -- from how pathetically he begged Delap to include him in his prayers -- that the great Samuel Johnson was veering out of control.

Left alone with the Thrales, Johnson became so overwrought, so violent in his self-accusations, so reckless in alluding to the sins for which he said he needed forgiveness that Henry and Hester were soon caught up in the general hysteria. "I felt excessively affected with grief, and well remember my husband involuntarily lifted up one hand to shut his mouth, from provocation at hearing a man so wildly proclaim what he could at last persuade no one to believe; and what, if true, would have been so very unfit to reveal."

It was an extraordinary scene: the handsome brewer clapping one hand over the mouth of London's most celebrated literary figure, while his agitated wife looked on in dread and horror. Something irreversible was happening to their friendship! The balance of power and need was being tipped forever by what Johnson was letting them see. They'd arrived as friends and hosts flattered by the doctor's affections, but uninvited, and perhaps a bit uncertain about their welcome and the future of their friendship. And now they had been drawn into this theatrical, eroticized tableau, from which they would emerge as guardians, saviors, confessors ...

The Lives of the Muses. Copyright © by Francine Prose. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Lives of the Muses
Nine Women & the Artists They Inspired

Hester Thrale

On a spring morning in 1766, Henry and Hester Thrale visited Dr. Samuel Johnson in his rooms at Johnson's Court.

The lively, attractive young couple had known the famous writer since 1764, when the playwright Arthur Murphy had brought Johnson to dinner at the Thrales' estate in Streatham Park, a few miles from central London. Since then, he had been a regular guest at Streatham, and at the Thrales' city place in Southwark, on the grounds of their profitable brewery. But lately, Johnson's visits had tapered off, and the Thrales had reason to suspect that he was suffering from one of the profound and terrifying fits of melancholia that had plagued him for most of his fifty-seven years. Already, they had grown close enough for Johnson to have confided his fears about "the horrible condition of his mind, which he said was nearly distracted."

Unlikely on the surface, the friendship was a tremendous coup for the socially ambitious Thrales. Johnson was famous not only for having written the Dictionary, the Rambler essays, The Life of Savage, and Rasselas but for his witty conversation. Among fashionable Londoners, watching the doctor talk had become a sort of spectator sport; at parties, guests crowded, four and five deep, around his chair to listen.

Johnson brought his own celebrity talking-and-sparring partners -- David Garrick, Oliver Goldsmith, Sir Joshua Reynolds -- along with him to Streatham, possibly because brisk repartee was not his host's strong suit. Well meaning and personable, properly insistent on his masculine right to overeat, hunt, and cheat publicly on his wife, Henry Thrale lacked, according to Johnson, the finer social skills. "His conversation does not show the minute hand; but he strikes the hour very correctly." He was the sort of rich, dull, solid fellow -- "such dead, though excellent, mutton," to quote Virginia Woolf's wicked assessment of Rebecca West's husband -- who turns up, with surprising frequency, in the lives of the muses.

Johnson liked the wealthy brewer; he admired the manly way he ran his household, and enjoyed the benefits of his expensive tastes in food and wine. Driven by an increasing horror of solitude and a craving for human companionship, the writer was drawn to the vibrant domesticity of Streatham, and especially to his hostess, a slight, dark-eyed Welsh fireball, who was disputatious, flirtatious, quick, well educated, and (unlike many of their contemporaries) unafraid of a man whom she described as having "a roughness in his manner which subdued the saucy and terrified the meek; this was, when I knew him, the prominent part of a character which few durst venture to approach so nearly."

Chroniclers of the period record the sparkling sorties that flew back and forth across the table between Samuel Johnson and Mrs. Thrale. And her own Anecdotes of the Late Samuel Johnson, LL.D., published in 1785, functions as a compendium not only of the writer's witticisms, but also of their exchanges on subjects ranging from faith to incredulity, from ghostly apparitions to the value of everyday knowledge, from marital discord to convent life, from the pleasures of traveling by coach to the rewards of reading Don Quixote, from the correct way to raise children to the necessity of constantly measuring one's minor complaints against the greater sufferings and privations of the poor.

The Thrales were tolerant of the writer's notorious eccentricities. Eventually, they would assign a servant to stand outside his door with a fresh wig for him to wear to dinner, since he so often singed the front of his wig by reading too close to the lamp. Nearly blind, disfigured by pockmarks, Johnson suffered from scrofula and a host of somatic complaints, as well as an array of psychological symptoms that, today, would virtually ensure that he was medicated for Tourette's, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, to name just the obvious syndromes. (The ongoing discussion of Johnson's "case" in medical literature has made him one of those figures, like Van Gogh and Lizzie Siddal, whose health care improved dramatically after death.) Happily, Samuel Johnson's own more permissive era was sufficiently enchanted by his intelligence, humor, and unflagging energy to overlook his rocking from foot to foot, mumbling, twitching, emitting startling verbal outbursts, obsessively counting his footsteps, touching each lamppost in the street, and performing an elaborate shuffle before he could enter a doorway.

The Thrales were used to the doctor's tics. Yet nothing could have prepared them for the scene they found on that May morning when at last they were admitted to the writer's rooms at Johnson's Court. His friend John Delap was just leaving, and it must have been instantly obvious -- from how pathetically he begged Delap to include him in his prayers -- that the great Samuel Johnson was veering out of control.

Left alone with the Thrales, Johnson became so overwrought, so violent in his self-accusations, so reckless in alluding to the sins for which he said he needed forgiveness that Henry and Hester were soon caught up in the general hysteria. "I felt excessively affected with grief, and well remember my husband involuntarily lifted up one hand to shut his mouth, from provocation at hearing a man so wildly proclaim what he could at last persuade no one to believe; and what, if true, would have been so very unfit to reveal."

It was an extraordinary scene: the handsome brewer clapping one hand over the mouth of London's most celebrated literary figure, while his agitated wife looked on in dread and horror. Something irreversible was happening to their friendship! The balance of power and need was being tipped forever by what Johnson was letting them see. They'd arrived as friends and hosts flattered by the doctor's affections, but uninvited, and perhaps a bit uncertain about their welcome and the future of their friendship. And now they had been drawn into this theatrical, eroticized tableau, from which they would emerge as guardians, saviors, confessors ...

The Lives of the Muses
Nine Women & the Artists They Inspired
. Copyright © by Francine Prose . Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

Introduction

Tracing the paths of nine women who became counterparts to some of the world's most intriguing creative geniuses, National Book Award finalist Francine Prose has crafted a unique work of biography, history, cultural commentary, romance, literary criticism, and wry humor. The profiles presented in The Lives of the Muses inspire lively conversation: the bittersweet affection between Alice Liddell and Alice in Wonderland author Lewis Carroll; the impact of progressive novelist and essayist Lou Andreas-Salomé on Nietzsche, Rilke, and Freud; soul mates Suzanne Farrell and choreographer George Balanchine, whose unconsummated affair could only manifest itself through ballet; Yoko Ono, the impetus behind John Lennon's musical and emotional liberation.

Each of Francine Prose's subjects dispels the stereotype of muse as passive beauty. Ranging from ethereal to pragmatic, but always charismatic and gifted, the women featured in The Lives of the Muses are all singular geniuses in their own right, challenging all who read about them to reconsider the qualities required for celebrity, and the conventional definitions of talent.

Discussion Questions

  1. In her introduction to The Lives of the Muses, Francine Prose discusses the complex Greek mythology surrounding the original muses. Do these narratives from Classicism, which weave deities, mortals, noble causes, and emotional melodrama, have any role in shaping contemporary creativity? How does twenty-first-century society explain the mystery of intellect and artistic inspiration?

  2. Describing the photograph of Lou von Salomé with philosophers Paul Reéand Friedrich Nietzsche that appears in chapter four, Francine Prose refers to Salomé's "ability to make others see the world as she does and maintain the faith that this vision is a dream that they have always shared, and are inventing, minute by minute." Does this definition of musedom lend itself to vocations not traditionally associated with philosophy, such as politics or technology? Who assumes this role in your professional and social circles?

  3. Discuss the spectrum of sexual intensity reflected by the collaborations in The Lives of the Muses. To what extent were love and eroticism distinct from the creative process? In which cases were they indistinguishable from it?

  4. In terms of attention, proximity, and affection, Hester Thrale was never completely available to Samuel Johnson. Was this inaccessibility an aspect of their mutual influence over one another, or do you believe that their literary careers would have been better served by a bona fide partnership between them?

  5. The young age at which Alice Liddell exerted her influence sets her apart from the other muses in the book. In what ways did youth make her an ideal muse? In what ways did her youth hinder her? Are there any parallels in the substantial age difference between Alice Liddell and Charles Dodgson and that of Suzanne Farrell and George Balanchine? How might age have affected Lou Andreas-Salomé's influence over Rainer Maria Rilke, who was twelve years younger than his muse?

  6. What does Elizabeth Siddal's experience indicate about the role of social rank and status in the balance of power between muse and artist? In what ways does she embody many of the contradictions of Victorian society?

  7. The many men with whom Lou Andreas-Salomé formed liaisons include philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche (early in her life), linguist Friedrich Carl Andreas (whom she married), poet Rainer Maria Rilke (whom she re-named), and Sigmund Freud (whose daughter Anna found a kind of surrogate mother in Lou). What do these relationships reflect about the various stages of Lou's life?

  8. What do you consider to be the nature of Gala Dalí's power over Salvador? What did you discover about the realities versus the myths of their marriage? Was the relationship steeped in the dynamics of their art, or vice versa?

  9. Did Lee Miller and Man Ray use the medium of photography to achieve opposite ends? To what extent were her experiences in World War II the embodiment of Surrealism? What might have revitalized her journalism career?

  10. With the publication of Through Another Lens in 1998, Charis Weston captured the stages of a muse's role in an artist's life, including the dissolution of the arrangement. Discuss Charis's journey from muse (and model) to "art wife" and eventually memoirist for Edward Weston. What seem to be the determining factors in the longevity of a muse, ranging from Alice Liddell's incomparable summer with Charles Dodgson to Gala and Salvador Dalí's decades of marriage?

  11. Suzanne Farrell became not only George Balanchine's muse, but also his protégé and successor. Theirs is also the only medium in the book that calls for physical motion. In what way did ballet itself become an active "participant" in their relationship?

  12. Yoko Ono's participation in John Lennon's medium was not matched by his hand in her art, though his presence in her life has likely left vicarious imprints on her work. Does the presence of Yoko's voice on recordings with John elevate her to a level other than muse or wife? What distinguishes muse from artist? Did Yoko's approach set a new standard that might have improved the lives of muses existing in less enlightened times?

  13. Is it possible to construct a composite muse from the nine women presented by Francine Prose? Do certain media require particular skills in their muses (visual art versus poetry, or philosophy versus dance and music)? Why might ancient Greeks have imagined all nine muses as female?

  14. With which muse could you most easily identify? Which one would you prefer to have as your muse? What aspects of your life would most benefit from the presence of a muse?

About the Author

Francine Prose is the author of a several highly acclaimed works of fiction, including Bigfoot Dreams, Household Saints, Hunters and Gatherers, Primitive People, Guided Tours of Hell, and the National Book Award Finalist Blue Angel. Her work has appeared in the New Yorker, the Atlantic Monthly, GQ, Harper's Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, and the Paris Review. The recipient of numerous grants and awards, including Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships, Francine Prose was a Director's Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. She Lives in New York City.

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Discovering What it Means to be a Muse

    THE LIVES OF THE MUSES examines how eight women (Hester Thrale, Elizabeth Siddal, Lou Andreas-Salome, Gala Dali, Lee Miller, Charis Weston, Suzanne Farrell, and Yoko Ono) and one little girl (Alice Liddell) provided essential inspiration to their artist companions. While artistic inspiration can come from many sources (music, fasting, prayer, meditation, romantic love), Francine Prose's book examines the romantic kind of artistic inspiration which arises between men and women -- with men typically playing the role of artist to the woman's role of muse. And who, exactly, is a muse? Francine Prose writes, "The muse is often that person with whom the artist has the animated imaginary conversations, the interior dialogues we all conduct, most commonly with someone we cannot get out of our minds." Francine Prose delves into some of the most intimate details of the muses' and artists' sexual lives, yet never loses touch with the vision of her book as a guidepost to better understanding the art of being a muse. While muses are chosen by artists, and therefore seemingly have no ability to chart muse-dom as a career path for themselves, they appear to share certain qualities with one another. For one thing, many muses have been intensely disliked by their contemporaries -- perhaps because people can intuitively sense that there is an unusually strong bond of love between an artist and his muse. If the subject of this book at times makes one feel uncomfortable, that is no doubt due to the fact that the interaction between artists and muses take people to the very greatest emotional heights and depths. The passions felt between artists and their muses are so tremendous that they sometimes provoke people's behavior to go completely out-of-control... yet these same passions present artists with some of their greatest sources of inspiration. Francine Prose's extraordinary book, THE LIVES OF THE MUSES, shows us a unique vision of how artists' lives are shaped and driven by the love and inspiration of their muses. It is the gift of the muse to offer her artist "that rare and precious spark ignited by genius and passion."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2012

    Educational and Enjoyable

    This is a fun and juicy way to get a bit of a history lesson. Well written and quite enjoyable to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

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    Posted August 20, 2013

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