Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought)

Overview

Scientists have a reputation for being focused on their work—and maybe even dull. But take another look. Did you know that it’s believed Galileo was scolded by the Roman Inquisition for sassing his mom? That Isaac Newton loved to examine soap bubbles? That Albert Einstein loved to collect joke books, and that geneticist Barbara McClintock wore a Groucho Marx disguise in public? With juicy tidbits about everything from favorite foods to first loves, the subjects of Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt’s Lives of...
See more details below
Hardcover (Library Binding)
$18.89
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$20.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $11.59   
  • New (11) from $11.59   
  • Used (4) from $12.10   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Scientists have a reputation for being focused on their work—and maybe even dull. But take another look. Did you know that it’s believed Galileo was scolded by the Roman Inquisition for sassing his mom? That Isaac Newton loved to examine soap bubbles? That Albert Einstein loved to collect joke books, and that geneticist Barbara McClintock wore a Groucho Marx disguise in public? With juicy tidbits about everything from favorite foods to first loves, the subjects of Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt’s Lives of the Scientists: Experiments, Explosions (and What the Neighbors Thought) are revealed as creative, bold, sometimes eccentric—and anything but dull.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Mightily entertaining."
Kirkus

"This collective biography is perfectly suited to thematic research as well as to reading for pleasure."
Booklist

"Another wonderful addition to the series, detailing common knowledge and little-known facts about historical figures."
School Library Journal

"Yes! Krull and Hewitt are back with another of those books, the eighth entry in their delightful Lives of . . . series."
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Eight short, lively chapters introduce twenty influential scientists of the modern era. Krull emphasizes memorable, and often humorously indiosyncratic, character traits."
The Horn Book Magazine

From the Publisher
"Mightily entertaining."
Kirkus

"This collective biography is perfectly suited to thematic research as well as to reading for pleasure."
Booklist

"Another wonderful addition to the series, detailing common knowledge and little-known facts about historical figures."
School Library Journal

"Yes! Krull and Hewitt are back with another of those books, the eighth entry in their delightful Lives of . . . series."
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Eight short, lively chapters introduce twenty influential scientists of the modern era. Krull emphasizes memorable, and often humorously indiosyncratic, character traits."
The Horn Book Magazine

School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—Another wonderful addition to the series, detailing common knowledge and little-known facts about historical figures. Krull asks the question, "What were these men and women like as human beings-in the laboratory and out of it?" She answers it well, giving a multifaceted picture of 20 scientists' personal lives and professional accomplishments, though more information about some of the lesser-known individuals might have provided a better idea of their work. Readers learn about great discovery and great quirkiness. James D. Watson and Francis Crick figured out the structure of DNA, but apparently Watson was in it just to meet girls. Albert Einstein developed the theory of relativity but described his good friend Marie Curie as "not attractive enough to represent a danger to anyone" when she became enamored of a married man. Edwin Hubble had a passion for the stars but had the obnoxious habit of trying to sound smarter than his guests by wowing them with obscure information he looked up in an encyclopedia before parties. A strong point of this volume is the inclusion of some important women (Barbara McClintock and Grace Murray Hopper, for example) who aren't often mentioned in biographies of this type. The oil paint illustrations are whimsical and fun and break up the text, making the amount of information more manageable. This estimable introduction to a variety of scientists will also appeal to fans of irreverent history who aren't quite ready for Georgia Bragg's macabre How They Croaked (Walker, 2011).—Trina Bolfing, Westbank Libraries, Austin, TX
Kirkus Reviews
Krull profiles 20 scientists--warning away at the outset anyone interested in the actual details of their discoveries because here, she's all about dishing on their lives and egos instead. Though in other works she focuses on scientific achievements, here Krull caters to readers less interested in Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect than that he had an affair with his cousin or in Newton's laws of physics than his practice, as warden of the Royal Mint, of attending the hangings of convicted counterfeiters. The author presents a series of quick biographical sketches, most capped with "Extra Credit" comments about each subject's enduring legacy--or, in the case of Einstein's brain and Galileo's fingers, errant body parts. Though all but two are dead (and the exceptions, Jane Goodall and James D. Watson, are no spring chickens), her choices for inclusion are reasonably diverse. Ibn Sina, George Washington Carver, and one ancient and one modern scientist of Asian descent expand the Eurocentric roster of usual suspects. Also, six women claim unique or shared entries, and several influential others, such as astronomer Henrietta Swan Leavitt, earn mentions. Hewitt adds typically funny, bigheaded but recognizable caricature portraits and iconic interior vignettes to lighten the informational load further. Mightily entertaining and if unlikely to broaden a young reader's knowledge of the history of science, certain to humanize it. (reading list, no source notes or index) (Collective biography. 9-12)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780152059095
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 7/9/2013
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 199,044
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Kathleen Krull has written much innovative nonfiction for young people, including all of the books in the Lives of . . . series, and has made a chatty, accessible approach to biography her hallmark. She lives in San Diego, California. Visit her website at www.kathleenkrull.com.

Kathryn Hewitt's caricatures of famous figures led kids to dub the Lives of . . . series the "Big Head" books. She has illustrated many books for young readers, some of which she also wrote. She lives in Santa Monica, California. Visit her website at www.kathrynhewitt.com.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)