Livin' the Blues: Memoirs of a Black Journalist and Poet

Livin' the Blues: Memoirs of a Black Journalist and Poet

by Frank Marshall Davis
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Frank Marshall Davis was a prominent poet, journalist, jazz critic, and civil rights activist on the Chicago and Atlanta scene from the 1920s through 1940s. He was an intimate of Langston Hughes and Richard Wright and an influential editor at the Chicago Evening Bulletin, the Chicago Whip, the Chicago Star, and the Atlanta World. He

See more details below

Overview

Frank Marshall Davis was a prominent poet, journalist, jazz critic, and civil rights activist on the Chicago and Atlanta scene from the 1920s through 1940s. He was an intimate of Langston Hughes and Richard Wright and an influential editor at the Chicago Evening Bulletin, the Chicago Whip, the Chicago Star, and the Atlanta World. He renounced his writing career in 1948 and moved to Hawaii, forgotten until the Black Arts Movement rediscovered him in the 1960s.

Because of his early self-exile from the literary limelight, Davis's life and work have been shrouded in mystery. Livin' the Blues offers us a chance to rediscover this talented poet and writer and stands as an important example of black autobiography, similar in form, style, and message to those of Langston Hughes and Richard Wright.

"Both a social commentary and intellectual exploration into African American life in the twentieth century."—Charles Vincent, Atlanta History

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Adds a fearless new voice to the Black Renaissance."—Kirkus Reviews

Library Journal
The memoirs of Frank Marshall Davis (1905-87) offer a fascinating view of early 20th - century America from the perspective of a gifted African American writer. Struggling against the restrictions of racisim, Davis, in his fight for self-esteem, developed a powerful voice as a journalist and a poet. Davis, the journalist, wrote for several major African American newspapers, serving as an advocate for the black voice in both art and society. Davis, the poet, published four volumes of poetry. His love of language and his poetic voice shine through in this creative representation of his life as a blues narrative. Woven into his life story is a vivid portrayal of African American cultural history of the 1930s and 1940s. Using the language of the jazz age, Davis integrates the history of jazz with his own developing sense of racial pride. His autobiography is an important addition to the recovery of significant American voices and belongs in most libraries.-- Judy Solberg, Univ. of Maryland Libs., College Park
Booknews
Davis (1905-87) chronicles his struggles against racial bias and his own negative self-image as he became a prominent journalist and poet in Chicago during the 1930s and 1940s. he turned his back on it all and moved to Hawaii in 1948, virtually disappearing from the literary world until he was rediscovered in the 1960s. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780299135003
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Publication date:
01/28/1993
Series:
Wisconsin Studies in Autobiography Series
Pages:
408
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >