Living in the Labyrinth: A Personal Journey through the Maze of Alzheimer's

Living in the Labyrinth: A Personal Journey through the Maze of Alzheimer's

4.6 3
by Diana Friel McGowin
     
 

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Living In The Labyrinth is the story of how one woman found the strength and the courage to cope with a devastating disease that has afflicted five million Americans. Far from being an exercise in self-pity or a standard autobiography, this is an unflinching and ultimately uplifting look at a debilitating illness from the inside out.

Overview

Living In The Labyrinth is the story of how one woman found the strength and the courage to cope with a devastating disease that has afflicted five million Americans. Far from being an exercise in self-pity or a standard autobiography, this is an unflinching and ultimately uplifting look at a debilitating illness from the inside out.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The last person one might expect to write a book about Alzheimer's disease is somebody sick with it. And yet McGowin, a middle-aged legal assistant living in Florida, here describes the slipping away of her life: she became confused easily, couldn't remember how to do her job, had to ``retire early,'' and didn't even know what was causing all of this disorientation. Unfortunately, she didn't have the most supportive of husbands, and was too embarrassed to confide in her children. Several physicians she consulted ``pooh-poohed'' her deteriorating condition with the all-too-familiar ``see a psychiatrist'' routine. Finally, after extensive medical and psychological testing, a doctor made the definitive diagnosis--early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Make no mistake: this wrenching account is neither a ``pity me'' look at Alzheimer's nor a standard autobiography. Instead, it is the story of how a woman took charge of her life under difficult circumstances. Friel tells how she relearned everyday tasks most often taken for granted. She also shows how habits and relationships had to change to meet new needs and challenges. She includes appendices of warning symptoms and national organizations that may be of help to Alzheimer's sufferers and their families. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
"A brave record...searingly  honest."—People  

"A stunner of a book...It takes the  reader on a terrifying by enlightening  journey."—San Antonio News Express

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786200665
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
02/01/1994
Edition description:
Large print ed
Pages:
247

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Living in the Labyrinth a Personal Journey through the Maze of Alzheimer's 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
SpryGuy More than 1 year ago
I found this book gripping.  It reads like a novel as Ms. McGowin tells her story of drifting into cognitive dysfunction and taking charge of her life.  She talks about herself and about others with profound insight and unvarnished honesty.  She talks about her despair and about her hope in a way that riveted my attention and left me misty-eyed.   However, I finished the book confused.  She apparently does have some serious cognitive dysfunction.  But on the second to the last page of the book, page 137 in my Nook version, the page titled "AFTERWORD," is she saying that she does NOT have Alzheimer's Disease?  What does she mean when she says  re-diagnosis has ruled out "the subject diagnosis" and "the subject disease" for her?  I can't find those two phrases anywhere else in the book.  What conclusion do you draw after reading that whole page?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent read for anyone especially someone who has been diagnosed with Dementia or Alzheimer. My father is 89 years old and has been diagnosed with Age Onset Dementia. This has helped me understand him as well as helping me be able to care for him. I read this book very quickly as it was hard to put down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This amazing book is written by an Alzheimer's victim herself. Diana Friel McGowin began having symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease at age 45. She gives us an inside look at what it's like to have this disease, from the first symptoms noticed, through the ordeal of searching for a diagnosis, to the finality in the diagnosis itself and the daily losses that come. Diana has a wonderful attitude, finding comfort in her memories of simple things: the smell of the small town library of her childhood, the the taste of icicles on her tongue, the sight of the first daffodils of spring, lightning bugs, a train whistle, her grandmother's violin. What a wonderful way to view it all, as she says 'I can sometimes enjoy the sweet fragrance of night blooming jasmine when no one else can.' We, the children of Alzheimer's victims, hope that a cure can be found, but if it doesn't come in our time, we do have an example of radiant acceptance.