Living in the Light

Living in the Light

by Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters
     
 

Legendary blues guitarist Ronnie Earl's embrace of religion and his recovery from drug and alcohol addiction and depression have all had an interesting impact on his music. One would think that peace and contentment would be the death of a fine blues musician -- after all, the music is supposed to be informed by hard living and despair. Maybe Earl had enough of those… See more details below

Overview

Legendary blues guitarist Ronnie Earl's embrace of religion and his recovery from drug and alcohol addiction and depression have all had an interesting impact on his music. One would think that peace and contentment would be the death of a fine blues musician -- after all, the music is supposed to be informed by hard living and despair. Maybe Earl had enough of those during his earlier life to inform his playing for a long time to come -- but it's also true that his current happiness has given his approach to the blues a certain kind of depth that is often missing in the playing of others. On the aptly titled Living in the Light he alternates between gospel, blues, and nearly uncategorizable blends of pop and blues styles. He shines brightest on the slow instrumentals. It's a very rare guitarist who can play a slow blues with real authority, and on tracks like "Recovery Blues" (which also features some stellar organ playing from Dave Limina) and the bottleneck-based "S.O.S.," he displays a lifetime's worth of experience and taste. The rest of the program is mixed, but ultimately very rewarding: he creates an arrangement of Bob Dylan's "What Can I Do for You" that is perfect in every way except for the choir; he whips up an absolute storm on "Child of a Survivor," a song that is sadly hamstrung by a surprisingly limp vocal performance on the part of Fabulous Thunderbirds frontman Kim Wilson (who redeems himself nicely on the Delta-style minimalism of "Donna Lee"). Earl's rendition of "Ain't Nobody's Business" is almost tender, and the album-closing "Pastorale" is simply gorgeous. What it all adds up to is a slightly befuddling but complex and ultimately quite lovely album from a man who has more than earned the right to throw a gospel choir into the mix once in a while if he feels like it.

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Product Details

Release Date:
06/02/2009
Label:
Stony Plain Music
UPC:
0772532134026
catalogNumber:
321340
Rank:
56433

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Ronnie Earl & the Broadcasters   Primary Artist
Ronnie Earl   Indexed Contributor,Guitar
Kim Wilson   Harmonica,Vocals,Guest Appearance
Edgar Blanchard   Background Vocals,Choir, Chorus
Rod Carey   Bass,Bass Guitar,Guest Appearance
Lorne Entress   Drums,Choir, Chorus
David Maxwell   Piano,Guest Appearance
Dave Limina   Piano,Hammond Organ,Hammond B3
Chris Trout   Choir, Chorus
Jimmy Mouradian   Bass,Bass Guitar
Jason James   Guitar,Guest Appearance
Dave Keller   Vocals,Guest Appearance
Debbie Blanchard   Choir, Chorus
Anna Beth Limina   Choir, Chorus
Caroline Poser   Choir, Chorus
Allison Vesey   Choir, Chorus
Kayla Vesey   Choir, Chorus
Lyle Webster   Background Vocals
Kayla Vesey   Background Vocals
Joe Vesey   Background Vocals
Deborah Blanchard   Background Vocals
Christine Macfarlane   Background Vocals
Chris Trout   Background Vocals
Caroline Poser   Background Vocals
Anna Beth Limina   Background Vocals
Allison Vesey   Background Vocals
Jason James   Guitar

Technical Credits

Ronnie Earl   Composer,Producer,Audio Production
Bob Dylan   Composer
Robert Lockwood   Composer
Lorne Entress   Director
Porter Grainger   Composer
Holger Petersen   Executive Producer
Marc Donahue   Mastering
Huck Bennert   Engineer
Everett Robbins   Composer
Rob Ignazio   Engineer
Mark Donahue   Remastering
Dave Keller   Composer
Deborah Blanchard   Composer
Holger Peterson   Audio Production

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