Living in the Material World [Bonus Tracks/Bonus DVD]

( 3 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
How does an instant multimillion-selling album become an underrated minor masterpiece? George Harrison's follow-up to the triple-disc All Things Must Pass which had been comprised of an immense backlog of great songs that he'd built up across the last years of his time with the Beatles, Living in the Material World was necessarily a letdown for fans and critics, appearing as it did two-and-a-half-years after its predecessor without that earlier album's outsized songbag from which to draw. And it does seem like Harrison narrowed his sights and his vision for this record, which has neither the bold musical expansiveness nor the overwhelming confidence of its predecessor. And ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
How does an instant multimillion-selling album become an underrated minor masterpiece? George Harrison's follow-up to the triple-disc All Things Must Pass which had been comprised of an immense backlog of great songs that he'd built up across the last years of his time with the Beatles, Living in the Material World was necessarily a letdown for fans and critics, appearing as it did two-and-a-half-years after its predecessor without that earlier album's outsized songbag from which to draw. And it does seem like Harrison narrowed his sights and his vision for this record, which has neither the bold musical expansiveness nor the overwhelming confidence of its predecessor. And while there are still some beautiful and delightfully lyrical, charming moments throughout, few of the melodies are as instantly memorable and compelling as those of most of the songs on the earlier record, and some of the most serious songs here, such as "The Light That Has Lighted the World," seem weighed down with their own sense of purpose, in ways that All Things Must Pass mostly but not entirely avoided. What Living in the Material World does show off far better than the earlier record, however, is Harrison's guitar work -- unlike the prior album, with its outsized contingent of musicians including Eric Clapton and Dave Mason on guitars, he's the only axeman on Material World, and it does represent his solo playing and songwriting at something of a peak. Most notable are his blues stylings and slide playing, glimpsed on some of the later Beatles sessions but often overlooked by fans. Perhaps a less serious title would have represented the album better, but nobody was looking for self-effacement from any ex-Beatle except Ringo who's also here, natch in those days. Even in the summer of 1973, after years of war and strife and disillusionment, some folks were still sort of looking -- to borrow a phrase from a Lennon-McCartney song -- or hoping to get from them something like "the word" that would make them free. And Harrison, God love him, had the temerity to actually oblige, to the extent of painting a few signs here and there suggesting where he'd found it and where we might, all with some great playing and some laughs. And it wasn't all serious -- there are pointed moments of humor throughout, especially on the title song; and "Sue Me, Sue You Blues" was a follow-up to Beatles-era tracks such as "Only a Northern Song," dealing with the internal workings and business side of his lingering involvement with the group, in this case the multiple, overlapping, sometimes rotating lawsuits that attended the breakup of their organization. And one track, "Try Some, Buy Some," which he'd given away to Ronnie Spector at the time, actually dated back to the All Things Must Pass sessions. [The 2006 remastered edition appeared as both a standard CD with bonus tracks and the same disc with a bonus DVD. There are also two important bonus tracks added on: "Deep Blue," which was originally the B-side of the "Bangla Desh" single, and a fantastic showcase for his acoustic guitar; and "Miss O'Dell," an exuberant and richly produced, light-hearted number. The DVD, running a total of about 15 minutes, included some choice footage of "Give Me Love" from the 1991 George Harrison tour of Japan.]
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 9/26/2006
  • Label: Capitol
  • UPC: 094637027622
  • Catalog Number: 70276

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) (3:38)
  2. 2 Sue Me, Sue You Blues (4:50)
  3. 3 The Light That Has Lighted the World (3:32)
  4. 4 Don't Let Me Wait Too Long (2:58)
  5. 5 Who Can See It (3:53)
  6. 6 Living in the Material World (5:30)
  7. 7 The Lord Loves the One (That Loves the Lord) (4:37)
  8. 8 Be Here Now (4:12)
  9. 9 Try Some Buy Some (4:10)
  10. 10 The Day the World Get 'Round (2:55)
  11. 11 Thats All (3:51)
  12. 12 Deep Blue (3:47)
  13. 13 Miss O'Dell (2:33)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)
  2. 2 Mis O'Dell
  3. 3 Sue Me, Sue You Blues
  4. 4 Living in the Material World
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
George Harrison Primary Artist
Ringo Starr Drums
Gary Wright Keyboards
Nicky Hopkins Keyboards
Jim Keltner Drums
Jim Gordon Drums
John Barham Strings
Jim Horn Flute, Saxophone
Klaus Voormann Bass
Technical Credits
George Harrison Composer
Phil Spector Producer
Kevin Howlett Liner Notes
Steve Rooke Remastering
Dhani Harrison Producer
Sam O'Kell Remastering
Olivia Harrison Producer
Drew Lorimer Art Direction
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    George Harrison has surrounded himself with creative genious!

    It's hard to believe that this music was recorded in 1972 (released 1973), the range of tempo, messages in each song (whether it's a prayer or story)and the clarity of each instrument (the variety is uncanny), George Harrison et al is refreshing, spiritual and thoroughly enjoyable for any music lover.

    Listen with any open ear, open heart and an open mind. Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Wonderful follow-up to an amazing album

    Honestly, I didn't get into 'Material World' until 2003, and that was after I heard the David Bowie cover of "Try Some Buy Some" on his 'Reality' album. As a life long Beatles and Harrison fan, I felt that I neglected this album far too long, then got it soonafter hearing the Bowie cover, and thought it was a great album (perhaps not as great as All Things Must Pass, but that was too hard an act to follow). So now I got the deluxe remastered edition, and it does sound improved over the original CD. It has the b-side "Miss O'Dell" which I did have for years on the "Give Me Love" single (one of my favorite non-LP tracks ever). I believe I avoided the Material World album for years because of the presumed spiritual, almost preachiness air that I thought Harrison was giving off (song titles such as "The Lord Loves the One (who loves the lord)" were evidence of this), but in the end, that wasn't a very good reason to neglect this gem of an album. George happened to be a certain frame of mind, and simply wrote about it, and in fact all the songs are very good -- I especially like the slower paced tracks ("The Light that has Lighted the Word", "Be Here Now", "That is All") and Hari's cynicism and social commentary lyrical bite that he did with the Beatles on "Taxman" and "Piggies" is here on "Sue Me Sue You Blues" (as 'material world' a song as it gets!). I also didn't realize until recently that on the album, George Harrison is the sole guitarist, so all the slides, acoustic, etc are all him, and beautifully done. Highly recommended if the only solo Hari you own is 'All Things Must Pass', and even if you have it on CD and not this version, it's worth getting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    How do you follow a Classic album?

    You don't. Having said that, this was a fantastic album. It didn't get the credit it was due. "Give me Love" was a great lead off single. The gentle guitar that blends accoustic blues with Eastern religion is a perfect blend of yin and yang. The guitar solo at the end of "The Lord Loves the One" may be George's best ever. The Title cut is pure fun, with Jim Horn and George trading licks on Sax and slide guitar on the fade out. Comes to a glorious climax of jazzy confection. The two bonus tracks were hidden B-side gems of "Bangladesh" and "Give Me Love". "Deep Blue" is about George's Mom dying of cancer and his inability to help her. One of his best songs ever. "Miss O'Dell" shows the humor George had that few took note of. The Limited Edition has some nice videos. The "Miss O'Dell video is my favorite. The odd Last Supper like group picture on the lawn of his then home is funny and comes to life in the video. The picture on the inside sleeve of the gatefold album cover was black and white, except for George. The colorized pictures are amazing. Thanks George for the memories. Slide guitar never sounded better, than it did in your hands.

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