Living with Autism

Living with Autism

by Megan Atwood
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Does someone you know or love have a health challenge? Do you think you may? If so, you may wonder how you'll ever cope. After all, it wasn't your choice to be in this position. It may be helpful to know that there are several factors you can control. Living with Health Challenges offers a first step toward understanding key current health issues. Each title is a

See more details below

Overview

Does someone you know or love have a health challenge? Do you think you may? If so, you may wonder how you'll ever cope. After all, it wasn't your choice to be in this position. It may be helpful to know that there are several factors you can control. Living with Health Challenges offers a first step toward understanding key current health issues. Each title is a comprehensive guide that examines your important questions. What are the causes and symptoms? What are the treatment options? What are some necessary lifestyle changes? Where can you go for help? Living with Health Challenges unlocks some of the mysteries surrounding these difficult issues and helps you make healthy, informed decisions so you can get on with life.

"Something's off." "He's just different." "What's wrong with her?" Outsiders often don't know how to relate to people with autism- and those people can't always show them. Their autism keeps them from communicating with others in expected ways. Autism can be a confusing, even controversial topic-and the research is constantly changing. This encouraging book updates you on the most current theories about this mysterious brain disorder and pays special attention to caregivers, showing how they can best help the autistic people in their lives-as well as themselves.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sara Lorimer
One out of 110 American children is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but understanding of autism is lagging; many people still think of autism as being limited to savants like Rain Man, or non-verbal people who rock back and forth. Living with Autism is a clearly written and helpful guide to the world of autism. It is aimed at teens with autism that can function—with help—in mainstream society, but is also for siblings, friends, classmates, and those who are just curious. The various types of ASD, from Asperger's syndrome to PPD-NOS, are discussed. It's difficult to know how to treat autism, as "an effective treatment...would have to help in many areas, including social skills, language skills, and behavior problems." Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and B.F. Skinner are discussed in detail, including how to use ABA to "help yourself or someone you care about with an ASD," for example using the "prompt" principle: "if your classmate with an ASD has trouble finding a seat in the cafeteria, tell him you will save him a seat and stand up so he can easily see the seat." ABA is "the only treatment...that is documented to work. However, a variety of other treatments are widely used...though their effectiveness is debated." These include Treatment and Education of Autistic and Communication Related Handicapped Children (TEACCH), DIR/Floortime, auditory integration training (AIT), and following a gluten-free, casein-free diet. Potentially dangerous alternative treatments, such as chelation, are warned against, discredited theories ("refrigerator mothers," vaccines causing autism) are debunked, and readers are cautioned to "gather as much information as [they] can from an unbiased source." A chapter on "public understanding and support" discusses how before the laws written in the 1970s ensured that children "were included in public schools...While individuals with ASDs still face significant challenges, they now have a variety of supportive resources available." College, job opportunities, housing options, community and family support are covered. (While the rest of the book could apply to people with autism anywhere, this chapter is focused on the US.) The teen years get a chapter of their own, with advice on managing physical changes, bullying, friendship, and dating. The challenges in understanding what norms and expectations are in school or when with peers is a large section of the book. Take care of yourself, recommends a chapter for siblings of kids with autism. Discuss your feelings with your parents, try to find a support group, "recognize the good things and ask for help to work through the challenges." There is help and support and friendship for the people on the spectrum, too. "There is no reason someone with an ASD cannot date or marry. Every individual has quirks that present challenges in relationships, and it is no different for individuals on the spectrum." The book encourages self-advocacy and finding a support system. "Remember to ask for help when you need it, and never forget that you don't have to be just like everyone else to live a happy and productive life." Color photographs show a variety of teens—boys and girls and of many races—both alone and in social situations. Sidebars contain statistics, suggestions for further reading, and questions to consider. Contains endnotes and an index. From the "Living with Health Challenges" series. Highly recommended for anyone who would like to know more about autism, from 10-year-olds learning about their own diagnosis to adults who would like to know more about their neurotypical children's classmates. Reviewer: Sara Lorimer

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781617831232
Publisher:
ABDO Publishing Company
Publication date:
12/15/2011
Series:
Living with Health Challenges Series
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >