Living Zen

Living Zen

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by Robert Linssen
     
 

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Living Zen is that rare achievement, both a survey of the rich history of Zen Buddhism and a guide to the practice of this most demanding and effortless art of being. Linssen, a distinguished Belgian scholar, offers a sage corrective to the idea that the Zen way is available only to those prepared to sit life out under the Bhodi-Tree. Gently but insistently he

Overview


Living Zen is that rare achievement, both a survey of the rich history of Zen Buddhism and a guide to the practice of this most demanding and effortless art of being. Linssen, a distinguished Belgian scholar, offers a sage corrective to the idea that the Zen way is available only to those prepared to sit life out under the Bhodi-Tree. Gently but insistently he undermines this typically Western view, inviting and enabling us, as Christmas Humphreys puts it in his preface, to take “the leap from thought to No-thought, from the ultimate duality of Illusion/Reality to a burst of laughter and a cup of tea.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802131362
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
5.35(w) x 8.19(h) x 1.00(d)

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Living Zen 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book that dwells deeply into Zen and Buddhism, examines the mechanisms of thought and thinking, explores some of the messages of J.Krishnamurti in comparison with Zen and Buddhism. The author explores into the why of things, unravels the false nature of values in a perceptive way. The only flaw in this book is that Zen and/or Buddhism seems to be glorified when compared with other systems of thought. For example, the author does not seem kind to Hinduism and Western systems. There are certain assumptions that the author takes in explaining his points. For example, the author seems to criticize the complex division in the Vedantic descriptions, stating that Zen is much simpler. Although the points may be well taken, the spirit is just not right, especially in an age where stress must be given to comparitive studies in a positive way. There may have been reasons why some systems have been described that way. Another example is the author's treatment of the state of 'Samadhi' which seems prejudiced.