Livingstone Mouse II

Livingstone Mouse II

by Pamela Duncan Edwards, Henry Cole
     
 

When the time comes for Livingstone Mouse to find a nest of his own, he wants it to be in the best place. I have heard that China is very nice," his mom says. But where is China? Could it be in a noisy cupboard? A smelly old shoe? A picnic basket? Can a small mouse find China all by himself? Livingstone isn't sure, but he is determined to find out.

Pamela

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Overview

When the time comes for Livingstone Mouse to find a nest of his own, he wants it to be in the best place. I have heard that China is very nice," his mom says. But where is China? Could it be in a noisy cupboard? A smelly old shoe? A picnic basket? Can a small mouse find China all by himself? Livingstone isn't sure, but he is determined to find out.

Pamela Duncan Edwards' endearing story of a mouse with a mission is beautifully brought to life by Henry Cole's lively illustrations. Livingstone is a hero who will captivate and delight his audience.

Author Biography:

Pamela Duncan Edwards has wowed audiences with a wealth of winning tales. Her children's books include Roar, Livingstone Mouse, Some Smug Slug, Barefoot, and Four Famished Foxes and Fosdyke. She lives in Virginia.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The brave but naïve explorer, Livingstone Mouse, returns to save the dance performance of the animals in Wild Wood. As he observes the foxes, the snakes, the centipede and others mess up their rehearsals, he keeps noting that their rhythm is off, but none of them will listen. He finally leads his insect band in the music they all need to succeed, to become the acclaimed maestro. Our hero is introduced on the jacket/cover�a coy but charming fellow who waves "hello." The dark forest is just the right setting for the lively anthropomorphic activities. Particularly in his double-page acrylic paint and watercolor-pencil illustrations, Cole invests each creature with engaging personality and behavior to display their initial unrhythmic frustrations. The final scene of all dancing together to Livingstone's beat is especially satisfying. 2000, Hyperion Books for Children, $16.49 and $15.99. Ages 4 to 8. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Children's Literature - Rae Valabek
A small mouse is searching for a home. He asks his mother where the greatest place in the world is located. She says she's heard that China is very nice. Livingstone then sets off to search for China. He travels and explores many places receiving advice from other creatures. He finally finds a teapot that a bat tells him is China. He builds his nest and lives happily ever after. The clever illustrations are from the mouse's perspective. For example, a tennis shoe is described as a "tall white shape rising majestically into the air."
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Livingstone sets off to explore the Wild Wood where various creatures are unsuccessfully preparing for a dance recital. The foxes are practicing their fox trot, but end up trouncing on each other's paws. The snakes are doing their own version of "The Twist," getting more tangled and frustrated by the minute. And the centipede is trying to do a clog dance, but keeps tripping over his boots. Livingstone assesses the situation and comes to the conclusion that their "rhythm is off." Not surprisingly, the would-be performers don't appreciate the little rodent's suggestions. Then, along with some insects that have been watching the rehearsals, he forms "Livingstone Mouse and His Insect Band," which hums and clicks and buzzes tunes that the animals can actually dance to, and the evening is a great success. The story, however, is rather predictable. From the first rejection that Livingstone receives, readers know that he will save the day. The appealing watercolor-and-acrylic illustrations depict a pudgy hero and myriad other creatures. While the drawings help to carry the rather weak plot, the book is still a supplemental purchase.-Roxanne Burg, Thousand Oaks Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Livingstone Mouse (1996) returns to the scene in a musically themed adventure. A gathering of woodland creatures preparing for a dance performance are nothing but tangled feet (or slithery knots in the case of the snakes) because they ain't got that swing. Then Livingstone Mouse comes to the rescue with a little rhythm, in a cheery tale that doubles as a modest natural-history lesson. An evening of dance is scheduled in the forest, but as Livingstone comes across the performers, he finds problems, problems, problems: the foxes are trotting on each others toes; the snakes turn the twist into a sheepshank; and the centipede can't get the clog dance right ("he keeps tripping over his boots"). In each instance, Livingstone politely mentions, "I think your rhythm's off." The artists tell him, in so many words, to mind his own P's and Q's; but their coaches agree with Livingstone, and he gathers them in his wake as he proceeds from one debacle to the next. The mouse and the coaches form Livingstone Mouse and His Insect Band to provide the necessary ingredient to make the dance a success-the beat. While the story has a pleasing progression with rhythmically repeating sequences, it also manages (in its own droll way) to convey an introduction to an entire company of animals that one might encounter in the woods, as well as a couple of sharply drawn, unusual insects: a cicada and a katydid. Cole's (The Wacky Wedding, 1999, etc.) artwork is perfectly silly, with lots of commanding two-page spreads in forest greens that make clear the laughable situations Livingstone has found. And a-one, and a-two, keep that rhythm Livingstone. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786803071
Publisher:
Hyperion Books for Children
Publication date:
09/01/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.79(w) x 11.28(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
5 - 9 Years

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