Liz Phair

Liz Phair

by Liz Phair
     
 

Who knew that all Liz Phair ever wanted was to be a pop star? Surely, her debut, Exile in Guyville, with its cinematic lo-fi production and frankness, never suggested as much, nor did its cleaner sequel, Whip-Smart, even if her appearance in negligee on the cover of Rolling Stone did imply she wanted a wider audience. InSee more details below

Overview

Who knew that all Liz Phair ever wanted was to be a pop star? Surely, her debut, Exile in Guyville, with its cinematic lo-fi production and frankness, never suggested as much, nor did its cleaner sequel, Whip-Smart, even if her appearance in negligee on the cover of Rolling Stone did imply she wanted a wider audience. In retrospect, perhaps the streamlined surfaces of Whitechocolatespaceegg were a bid for the big time, but it was undercut by songs of motherhood, marriage, and remnants of her time as an indie queen. All of that is a distant memory on her long-delayed eponymous fourth album, where she makes a long-delayed stab at superstardom, glamming herself up like a Maxim MILF of the Month and pitching herself somewhere between Sheryl Crow and Avril Lavigne, on one side working with Michael Penn and adult alternative singer/songwriter Pete Yorn and on the other hooking up with 2003's hitmakers du jour the Matrix (not wanting to lose her aging core audience, she began her support tour for the album opening for the thirty-something darlings of the early 2000s, the Flaming Lips, even if her new music was a far cry from indie). As "Extraordinary" starts the album with a heavy guitar downstroke, it's clear that Phair has piled nearly all her chips on making it as a pop act, delivering music that not just fits comfortably with Lavigne's, but follows her sounds and stance. Yet Exile in Guyville had such a lasting impact, it's impossible to shake its memory when hearing newer work such as this. Liz Phair is running away from that shadow on Liz Phair, creating a record that is pretty much the polar opposite of that album, a shiny bright affair that wants nothing more than to be taken as a confection, even when it tries to dig deeper. [Liz Phair was also released in a "clean" version, removing the profanities.]

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Editorial Reviews

Blender - Ann Powers
The best songs on Liz Phair cut through the bullshit to portray a hot young mom reflecting on lust and guilt. Let's hope people can hear the smarts behind the sheen.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/24/2003
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0724358392807
catalogNumber:
83928

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Extraordinary
  2. Red Light Fever
  3. Why Can't I
  4. It's Sweet
  5. Rock Me
  6. Take a Look
  7. Little Digger
  8. Fire Walker
  9. Favorite
  10. Love/Hate Transmission
  11. HWC
  12. My Bionic Eyes
  13. Friend of Mine
  14. Good Love Never Dies

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Liz Phair   Primary Artist,Vocals,Sampling
Michael Penn   Bass,Guitar,Background Vocals,Sampling
Lenny Castro   Percussion
Matt Chamberlain   Drums
Victor Indrizzo   Drums
Buddy Judge   Guitar,Background Vocals
Wendy Melvoin   Guitar
David Sutton   Bass
Patrick Warren   Piano,Keyboards
Jebin Bruni   Keyboards
John Sands   Drums
Mike Elizondo   Bass
Wizardry of Oz   Vocals
Alison Clark   Background Vocals
Mario Calire   Drums
Abe Laboriel   Drums
Mike Stinson   Drums
Corky James   Guitar
R. Walt Vincent   Bass,Guitar,Electric Guitar,Background Vocals,Wurlitzer
Matrix   Vocals

Technical Credits

Michael Penn   Producer,Engineer
Matrix   Arranger
Liz Phair   Producer
Ted Jensen   Mastering
Eddy Schreyer   Mastering
Howard Willing   Engineer
Krish Sharma   Drum Recordings
Doug Boehm   Engineer
Ryan Freeland   Engineer
Eric Roinestad   Art Direction
R. Walt Vincent   Producer,Engineer
Matrix   Arranger,Producer,Engineer

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