Lizzy's Do's and Don'ts

Lizzy's Do's and Don'ts

by Jessica Harper, Lindsay Harper Dupont, Lindsay Harper Dupont
     
 

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It seemed to Lizzy,
all her mother ever said was

Don't!

Will she ever say

DO?

Kids will know just what Lizzy is feelins in every scene —
and moms will also find reason to smile!

 See more details below

Overview

It seemed to Lizzy,
all her mother ever said was

Don't!

Will she ever say

DO?

Kids will know just what Lizzy is feelins in every scene —
and moms will also find reason to smile!

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
“…gives children a sense of empowerment and also encourages parents to think about the power of their words.”
Publishers Weekly
In their third book, this sister duo (I'm Not Going to Chase the Cat Today!) offers testimony to the values of positive reinforcement. The relationship between pigtailed Lizzie and her mother spirals into an unproductive duel of "don'ts." The parent's litany includes "Don't bring the sand home from the beach. Don't feed the kitty cat a peach. Don't, don't, don't!" while Lizzie's list of don'ts for her mother concludes, "Don't chat, chat, chat on the telephone. Don't lick so much of my ice-cream cone. Don't, don't, don't!" The premise borrows a page from David Shannon's No, David!, and the text here sometimes stretches to complete the rhyme. Although the artwork possesses an editorial cartoon quality that starts to wear thin, the illustrator alters the pacing with small and big boxes on the spreads, and by using the word "don't" as a graphic element, sometimes large, other times as a kind of wallpaper pattern. The book's resolution with mom and daughter agreeing to plenty of "Dos" ("Do please let me keep the lizard. Do take me sledding in a blizzard. Do, do, do!") accentuates the positive. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
To many a child, Mom's favorite word seems to be "don't." Lizzy thinks she's heard more than her share: "Don't leave your party shoes in the yard/Don't take the deck and lose one card/Don't put 10 Band-Aids on your knees/Don't argue please." Tired of this constant litany, Lizzy details her own don'ts for Mom: "Don't huff and puff/Don't say two chocolates are enough/ Don't make me wear that yellow dress/Don't chat, chat, chat on the telephone. Don't, don't don't!" After thinking for a while, both Lizzy and her mom come up with a new and better list of do's. "Do hold me close when I am scared/Do teach me how to be prepared/ Do tell a fairy tale to me," and "Do tell me when life seems unfair/Do wear pink polka dots with plaid/Do help me zipper up my dress/Do tell me if my hair's a mess/Do I love you? Yes I do, do, do!" Rather than just focusing on the negative, Harper turns it around, resulting in a positive, empowering book. Her sister's cartoon-like illustrations capture Lizzie's and Mom's feelings, closely aligning themselves with the rhyming text. She alters the size of the drawings, from full-page to miniatures within boxes, and the font, and even uses the words don't and do as graphic elements. There's not a child who won't identify with Lizzy. This book gives them, and their parents, food for thought? and a fun time! 2002, HarperCollins, Publishers,
— Peg Glisson
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-This story moves along briskly and with humor, as mother and daughter embrace the "do's" rather than "don'ts" of their relationship and reaffirm their love. Lizzy's mother, like most, says "don't" a lot: "Don't shout indoors.- Don't lick the dog-. Don't argue-." Lizzy counters with a few commands of her own. Eventually the two decide to think up some helpful and adventuresome "do's." Children (and people who live or work with them) will identify with the litany of reprimands and appreciate the positive alternatives. The words "do" and "don't" repeat in the text and the illustrations, sometimes two inches high in bold handwriting, sometimes small like a wallpaper background across the page. The text rhymes, though the beat changes awkwardly, and the progression of the multiple text boxes on some of the pages can be confusing. Overall, though, the simple, engaging pictures focus attention on the characters' relationship and match the fun-loving mood of the story.-Laurie von Mehren, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
With the same panache of their previous collaborations (Nora's Room, 2001, etc.), the Harper sisters create a spunky tale about the woes and challenges of growing up. Harper tackles a subject familiar to every household engaged in child-rearing�the frequent occurrence of the word "don't." A child lists the deluge of restrictions she encounters in the course of daily life. From prohibitions about climbing bee-infested trees to sequestering reptiles in footwear, young Lizzy has had it with the that dreadful "don't." In retaliation, she provides her mother with her own list of "don'ts." Lizzy's proclamation is a blend of poignant and humorous dictums, including a plea to stay off the telephone a little more and a ban on a dreaded yellow dress. "Don't always say my hair's a mess. / Don't say no when you could say yes. / Don't, don't, don't!" Exhausted by their diatribe, the pair comes up with a list of things they wish each other would do. With keen insight and a comic touch, Harper spearheads the elemental truth of parenting; amid the squabbles and strife is the steadfast love a parent and child share. DuPont's bold illustrations perfectly capture the energy of the tale. A blend of comic-strip layouts alternated with full-page spreads reflects the rhythms of the tale. With wry observations couched in perky rhymes and a lively tempo, Harper's light-hearted tale delivers a sincere reminder to parents and children to treasure each other. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780066238616
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/26/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Jessica Harper is an actor and singer-songwriter whose CDs of children's music have Won many honors, including the Parents' Choice Gold, Oppenheim Platinum, and NAPPA awards. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and their two daughters, Nora and Elizabeth.

Lindsay Harper DuPont is an artist. She lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, with her husband and their three children, Sammy, Rosie, and George.

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