A Local Habitation (October Daye Series #2)

A Local Habitation (October Daye Series #2)

4.3 104
by Seanan McGuire
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

New York Times-bestselling October Daye series • Hugo Award-winning author Seanan McGuire • "Top of my urban-paranormal series list!" —Felicia Day

October "Toby" Daye is a changeling, the daughter of Amandine of the fae and a mortal man. Like her mother, she is gifted in blood magic, able to read what has happened to a

Overview

New York Times-bestselling October Daye series • Hugo Award-winning author Seanan McGuire • "Top of my urban-paranormal series list!" —Felicia Day

October "Toby" Daye is a changeling, the daughter of Amandine of the fae and a mortal man. Like her mother, she is gifted in blood magic, able to read what has happened to a person through a mere taste of blood. Toby is the only changeling who has earned knighthood, and she re-earns that position every day, undertaking assignments for her liege, Sylvester, the Duke of the Shadowed Hills.

Now Sylvester has asked her to go to the County of Tamed Lightning—otherwise known as Fremont, CA—to make sure that all is well with his niece, Countess January O'Leary, whom he has not been able to contact. It seems like a simple enough assignment—but when dealing with the realm of Faerie nothing is ever as simple as it seems.

Toby soon discovers that someone has begun murdering people close to January, whose domain is a buffer between Sylvester's realm and a scheming rival duchy. If Toby can't find the killer soon, she may well become the next victim.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"McGuire's second October Daye novel is a gripping, well-paced read. Toby continues to be an enjoyable, if complex and strong-willed protagonist who recognizes no authority but her own...McGuire has more than a few surprises up her sleeve for the reader." —Romantic Times Book Review

"...for those of you who have read Rosemary and Rue, I have to say: A Local Habitation is even better. All the things that made Rosemary and Rue such a strong debut are still there: the wonderfully damaged heroine, the melancholy story, the gritty details, the perfect rendering of San Francisco, [and] unique and varied fantastic creatures..." —Book Love Affair

Praise for the series:

"At last, urban fantasy done right!...Seanan McGuire's October Daye series gives us that perfect melding of "real world" and magic, with just a dash of romantic subplot, enhancing the main story rather than derailing it." —Collectortimes.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756405960
Publisher:
DAW
Publication date:
03/02/2010
Series:
October Daye Series, #2
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
115,634
Product dimensions:
4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"McGuire's second October Daye novel is a gripping, well-paced read. Toby continues to be an enjoyable, if complex and strong-willed protagonist who recognizes no authority but her own...McGuire has more than a few surprises up her sleeve for the reader." —Romantic Times Book Review

"...for those of you who have read Rosemary and Rue, I have to say: A Local Habitation is even better. All the things that made Rosemary and Rue such a strong debut are still there: the wonderfully damaged heroine, the melancholy story, the gritty details, the perfect rendering of San Francisco, [and] unique and varied fantastic creatures..." —Book Love Affair

"At last, urban fantasy done right!...Seanan McGuire's October Daye series gives us that perfect melding of "real world" and magic, with just a dash of romantic subplot, enhancing the main story rather than derailing it." —Collectortimes.com (for October Daye series)

Meet the Author

Seanan McGuire is a California-based author with a strong penchant for travel and can regularly be found just about anyplace capable of supporting human life (as well as a few places that probably aren’t). Early exposure to a vast number of books left her with a lifelong affection for the written word, and led, perhaps inevitably, to her writing books of her own, starting somewhere around the age of eleven. The October Daye novels are her first urban fantasy series, and the InCryptid novels are her second series, both published by DAW and bother of which have put her in the New York Times bestseller list. Seanan was the winner of the 2010 John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer; Rosemary and Rue, the first novel in the October Daye series, was named one of the Top 20 Paranormal Fantasy Novels of the Past Decade; and her novel Feed, written under the name Mira Grant, was named as one of Publishers Weekly's Best Books of 2010. She also won a Hugo for her podcast, and is the first person to be nominated for five Hugo Awards in a single year. You can visit her at www.seananmcguire.com.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Local Habitation 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 104 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed the first book in this series, but I am a little over a hundred pages into this book and I am bored stiff. I read two to four books a week and almost never give up on a book, but I am about to stop reading this book. Boring, repetitive and uninteresting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've purchased many of her books but this one bored me to distraction and was without the quirky personality in everything else I've read so far. I liked that her style is similiar to Jim Butcher's writing. This book, however, smacks of editor re-re-re-write which didn't honor the traditional style of the writer. The writer should have shelved this one as a lost cause.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
loved it!
Talekyn More than 1 year ago
Second books in urban fantasy series can be tricky, IMHO. The first book is about introducing the main character and setting some parameters for what they are capable of, with just enough world-building to satisfy the reader as to how different/similar the setting is to our real world. The urge with an open-ended series that may or may not continue depending on sales is, I think, to throw a ton of world-building into the second book, to prove to the reader that there is so much more to explore. And I think this urge is often to the detriment of telling a solid story, especially if the second book (or movie) ends in a cliffhanger. Thankfully, this is not the case with the second October Daye book. The characters and the central mystery come first, and every world-building revelation (about Faerie court politics, the way the boundaries of Counties and Knowes are set up, the way each Faerie race has a "job," etc) is in service to the story. Even when you're aware of a scene being a large info-dump (here I'm thinking specifically of the background on the Night Haunts), it is woven so well into the narrative, comes at such an appropriate place in the story, that you don't notice ... because it doesn't break the pace of the story at all. The central mystery: what exactly IS going on in the county of Tamed Lightning (located near Fremont, California and stuck between Shadowed Hills, aka San Francisco, the county ruled by Toby's liege Duke Sylvester, and Dreamer's Glass, ruled by the Duchess Riordan) and why do residents keep turning up dead, is a very tight little "locked room" mystery. Or locked building, if you will, since the action ranges over most of the "county" of Tamed Lightning via a building in the mortal world. McGuire gives us, and Toby, a roomful of likely suspects, each with a secret of their own that Toby and her sidekick Quentin must ferret out if they're going to solve the bigger mystery. As with any classic mystery story, the people Toby meets are not always as forthcoming as you would hope one would be in the midst of a murder spree. But that's what makes stories like this work: the reader knows XX character is hiding something from the detective ... but because these books are narrated in first person by Toby, we don't find out any quicker than she does what those little secrets are. Still, the astute reader can pick up on details that Toby isn't consciously noticing at the moment but that McGuire clearly wants us to notice. (At one point in the book, I wondered aloud why we hadn't seen a particular character for quite a while, and why Toby hadn't seemed to notice that character had gone missing ... and a couple of chapters later, Toby puts that piece together with other information to reach a conclusion I won't spoil here.) There is also a great deal of character development for Toby and especially for Quentin, the teenage squire (for lack of a better term) Sylvester sends with Toby on what at first blush is a mission to just check on Sylvester's niece and report back. There is a great bond developing between Toby and Quentin that I assume future books (there are 7 books in the series so far) will further enhance. McGuire really captures the "sullen but adoring teenager" character well in Quentin; the Toby-Quentin relationship, right now at least, reminds me of mine with my nephew Jared. Toby's voice, as the narrator, is of course the strongest in the book ... but Toby is perceptive, a reliable narrator, and I don't suspect that her interpretations of the behavior of the people she loves (Sylvester, Luna, Quentin, Connor, even the Luidaeg) are very off-base as some narrators can be.
CheshireTheEngineer More than 1 year ago
Good start and end. The middle takes a bit since it seems the involved characters have lost most of their marbles for awhile. A bit of a slog reading about the folks dying for what appears to be no real reason. I look forward to #3 anyway.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this author and the Ocober Daye series! Well thought out,action packed and well written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago