The Lockean Theory of Rights / Edition 1

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Overview

"A detailed and comprehensive presentation of Lockean theory as a contribution to modern debates about rights, property, justice, government, and consent. It will be as indispensable to participants in these debates as it will to be those who are interested in the work of John Locke."—Jeremy Waldron, University of California, Berkeley

"[This book] is by far the most careful and balanced treatment of this central issue and will be of great value not only to philosophers but also to historians of ideas."—John Dunn, Cambridge University

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Editorial Reviews

The Times Higher Education Supplement - G.A. J. Rogers
[Simmon's] densely argued and heavily referenced work—he reveals deep knowledge of both the primary and secondary literature and overturns many a famous name in a footnote—provides us with a powerful analysis of what is probably the central moral concept of Locke's political philosophy, namely his theory of rights.
American Political Science Review - Ian Harris
. . . a remarkable volume—by far the best treatment of Locke's account of rights and one that is likely to remain so, because it treats the texts with intelligent scholarship and argues with a high degree of sophistication. . .
Ethics - Susan L. Mendus
[Simmons] succeeds triumphantly in showing that the issues are still alive, and that even if Locke cannot solve our problems, he has much to contribute to an understanding of them.
Canadian Review of Political Science - Ross Rudolph
. . . a comprehensive monograph that goes beyond a learned interpretation of Locke's texts to a reconstruction of a more plausible and contemporarily more acceptable, Lockean theory of rights . . . [T]his penetrating and sympathetic study is a welcome antidote to some tendentious recent monographs, of equal interest to the philosophically and historically inclined.
The Times Higher Education Supplement - G. A. J. Rogers
[Simmon's] densely argued and heavily referenced work—he reveals deep knowledge of both the primary and secondary literature and overturns many a famous name in a footnote—provides us with a powerful analysis of what is probably the central moral concept of Locke's political philosophy, namely his theory of rights.
The Times Higher Education Supplement - G.A.J. Rogers
[Simmon's] densely argued and heavily referenced work—he reveals deep knowledge of both the primary and secondary literature and overturns many a famous name in a footnote—provides us with a powerful analysis of what is probably the central moral concept of Locke's political philosophy, namely his theory of rights.
From the Publisher
"A powerful analysis. . . . [It] succeeds in demonstrating the depth and cogency of much of Locke's moral and political thought and leaves us with a number of excellent reasons for believing that . . . talk of natural rights of a distinctly Lockean kind is indispensable for any satisfactory account of the just society."—G. A. J. Rogers, The Times Higher Education Supplement

". . . a remarkable volume—by far the best treatment of Locke's account of rights and one that is likely to remain so, because it treats the texts with intelligent scholarship and argues with a high degree of sophistication. . ."—Ian Harris, American Political Science Review

"[Simmon's] densely argued and heavily referenced work—he reveals deep knowledge of both the primary and secondary literature and overturns many a famous name in a footnote—provides us with a powerful analysis of what is probably the central moral concept of Locke's political philosophy, namely his theory of rights."—G. A. J. Rogers, The Times Higher Education Supplement

"[Simmons] succeeds triumphantly in showing that the issues are still alive, and that even if Locke cannot solve our problems, he has much to contribute to an understanding of them."—Susan L. Mendus, Ethics

". . . a comprehensive monograph that goes beyond a learned interpretation of Locke's texts to a reconstruction of a more plausible and contemporarily more acceptable, Lockean theory of rights . . . [T]his penetrating and sympathetic study is a welcome antidote to some tendentious recent monographs, of equal interest to the philosophically and historically inclined."—Ross Rudolph, Canadian Review of Political Science

"The Lockean Theory of Rights is an exceptionally good book: Strong, clear, forceful, level-headed, and magnificently patient-an object lesson in educational maturity."—International Studies in Philosophy

American Political Science Review
. . . a remarkable volume—by far the best treatment of Locke's account of rights and one that is likely to remain so, because it treats the texts with intelligent scholarship and argues with a high degree of sophistication. . .
— Ian Harris
Ethics
[Simmons] succeeds triumphantly in showing that the issues are still alive, and that even if Locke cannot solve our problems, he has much to contribute to an understanding of them.
— Susan L. Mendus
Canadian Review of Political Science
. . . a comprehensive monograph that goes beyond a learned interpretation of Locke's texts to a reconstruction of a more plausible and contemporarily more acceptable, Lockean theory of rights . . . [T]his penetrating and sympathetic study is a welcome antidote to some tendentious recent monographs, of equal interest to the philosophically and historically inclined.
— Ross Rudolph
International Studies in Philosophy
The Lockean Theory of Rights is an exceptionally good book: Strong, clear, forceful, level-headed, and magnificently patient-an object lesson in educational maturity.
The Times Higher Education Supplement
[Simmon's] densely argued and heavily referenced work—he reveals deep knowledge of both the primary and secondary literature and overturns many a famous name in a footnote—provides us with a powerful analysis of what is probably the central moral concept of Locke's political philosophy, namely his theory of rights.
— G. A. J. Rogers
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Product Details

Table of Contents

List of Abbreviations
Acknowledgments
Introduction 3
1 The Structure of Locke's Moral Theory
1.1 The Demonstration of Morality 14
1.2 Why We Ought to Obey God 26
1.3 The Secular Strain 36
1.4 The Superstructure of Locke's Theory 46
1.5 The Content of Natural Law 59
2 Locke and Natural Rights
2.1 The Place of Rights in Locke's Theory 68
2.2 Equal Rights and Special Rights 79
2.3 The Structure of Locke's Theory of Rights 87
2.4 The Significance of Natural Rights 95
2.5 Natural Rights Skepticism 102
3 The Right to Punish
3.1 A Natural Executive Right 121
3.2 Locke's Case 127
3.3 Replies 134
3.4 The Coherence of Locke's Position 140
3.5 Forfeiture and Punishment 148
3.6 The Monopoly on Force 161
4 Rights and the Family
4.1 Wives, Husbands, and Servants 167
4.2 The Rights of Parents (and the Duties of Children) 177
4.3 The Rights of Children (and the Duties of Parents) 192
4.4 The Family and Property 204
4.5 The Family and Political Society 212
5 Property Rights
5.1 Natural Property Rights 222
5.2 Labor: The Arguments 236
5.3 Labor: Replies and Reconstructions 264
5.4 The Limits on Property 278
5.5 Money 298
6 Justice and Charity
6.1 Property in Political Society 307
6.2 Justice 318
6.3 Charity 327
6.4 Positive and Negative Rights 336
Conclusion 353
Works Cited 355
Index 377
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