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Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West
     

Lone Star Navy: Texas, the Fight for the Gulf of Mexico, and the Shaping of the American West

by Jonathan W. Jordan
 

**WINNER OF THE 2007 UNITED STATES MARITIME LITERATURE AWARD**In the 1830s, Mexico endured a tragic era of internal political instability. Meanwhile, bold American frontiersmen sought their fortunes beyond the borders of the United States, with many settling in the Mexican territory of Texas. In 1835, these transplanted Americans led a revolt against

Overview


**WINNER OF THE 2007 UNITED STATES MARITIME LITERATURE AWARD**In the 1830s, Mexico endured a tragic era of internal political instability. Meanwhile, bold American frontiersmen sought their fortunes beyond the borders of the United States, with many settling in the Mexican territory of Texas. In 1835, these transplanted Americans led a revolt against Texas's embattled rulers in Mexico City. Lone Star Navy chronicles the little fleet of wooden warships, bought on credit by an impoverished band of revolutionaries and sent to sea on a singular mission: to win Texas's independence from Mexico. Beginning with four small sailing vessels, the upstart flotilla became a vital counterpart to Texan armies fighting for an independent republic. Indeed, Capt. Jeremiah Brown's naval battle off Matamoros in April 1836 helped save the fledgling republic from a premature end. But even as it battled for independence on the Gulf of Mexico, the Texas navy came under attack from unexpected enemies. The same fierce individuality that led Texans to shake off their Mexican rulers also stymied their efforts to govern themselves with any consensus. Lauded by its advocates as strategically vital and ridiculed by its detractors as a farcical waste of money, the navy became a flashpoint in a clash of visions. Denied adequate funding, sailors and officers suffered long periods without pay, and their vessels fell into chronic disrepair, but they still defended their small nation's fortunes.The decrepit remains of the battle-scarred fleet finally fell into American hands when Texas, in need of a strong ally, was annexed by the United States in 1845. The Mexican government prophesied that relinquishing Texas would lead to the loss of its other northern territories. And, indeed, the Mexican War and the U.S. acquisition of New Mexico, Arizona, California, and parts of Utah, Colorado, and Nevada soon followed.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“At last, a narrative on the incredible saga of the Republic of Texas Navy. Overlooked and forgotten for more than 160 years, its commander, Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, has been brought back to life and recognized as the greatest hero and naval tactician since John Paul Jones. Jonathan Jordan is to be complimented for filling a huge gap in American history.”

“Jon Jordan’s study overshadows all others on the subject.”

“Jonathan Jordan has told a fascinating story with great clarity. I particularly admire his explications of the domestic and international political situations. His descriptions of the naval battles are easy to follow.”

“An exceptionally thorough and deeply researched history of an overlooked but significant military force that helped win Texan independence from Mexico. A well-told story as well as solid history.”

“Jordan combines the historian’s discriminating eye for facts with the writer’s art for the story. Seldom does one see a historical subject covered in such depth without getting dull, but Jordan pulls it off beautifully.”

“More than a century after the tiny, ill-fated navy of the Republic of Texas lowered its distinctive colors for the last time, Texans remain fascinated with its epic story. This fine work, boldly written and thoroughly researched, combines an engaging narrative with a detailed analysis that should be read not just by Texans, but by scholars in many fields.”

"This is the most comprehensive work I have read on the Texas Navy. The depth of research and thoughtful analysis exceeds the old classics. Jonathan W. Jordan has a fine writing style that makes the work very readable, and his understanding of nautical terminology and the working of sailing ships adds credibility. Mr. Jordan demonstrates an excellent understanding of Texas’s internal and external politics, which makes this work essential for both the buff and the professional historian."

"The most comprehensive look at the Texas Navy . . . The author does an excellent job of fitting the story of the Texas naval service into the political, economic, and diplomatic life of the republic, while providing a look at the men and ships, and the operations in which they were involved, some of them among the most impressive maritime feats of their times."

"Jordan makes his case with engaging prose. . . . As much as Lone Star Navy is a great adventure tale told entertainingly, it is also serious history. For while he does tell the often raucous saga of the Texas Navy, he meticulously researched every fact presented. . . . If you are a fan of novels by Patrick O'Brien, you are as likely to be entertained by this book."

"A bright young historian has at last resurrected the incredible saga of the Republic of Texas Navy in a full-length book. And what a book it is--comprehensively filling in as it does a tremendous void in American history."

"Expansive and cogent."

"Packed with action and insights on a little-covered group."

Clive Cussler
"At last, a narrative on the incredible saga of the Republic of Texas Navy. Overlooked and forgotten for more than 160 years, its commander, Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, has been brought back to life and recognized as the greatest hero and naval tactician since John Paul Jones. Jonathan Jordan is to be complimented for filling a huge gap in American history."—Clive Cussler, author of The Sea Hunters: True Adventures with Famous Shipwrecks
Robert L. Scheina

"This is the most comprehensive work I have read on the Texas Navy. The depth of research and thoughtful analysis exceeds the old classics. Jonathan W. Jordan has a fine writing style that makes the work very readable, and his understanding of nautical terminology and the working of sailing ships adds credibility. Mr. Jordan demonstrates an excellent understanding of Texas’s internal and external politics, which makes this work essential for both the buff and the professional historian."—Robert L. Scheina, author of Santa Anna: A Curse Upon Mexico
Walter P. Nass

"Jon Jordan’s study overshadows all others on the subject."—Walter P. Nass, chief information officer, Texas Navy Association
Michael Crawford

"Jonathan Jordan has told a fascinating story with great clarity. I particularly admire his explications of the domestic and international political situations. His descriptions of the naval battles are easy to follow."—Michael Crawford, author of The Early Republic and the Sea: Essays on the Naval and Maritime History of the Early United States
Robert M. Utley

"An exceptionally thorough and deeply researched history of an overlooked but significant military force that helped win Texan independence from Mexico. A well-told story as well as solid history."—Robert M. Utley, author of Lone Star Justice: The First Century of the Texas Rangers
James L. Haley

"Jordan combines the historian’s discriminating eye for facts with the writer’s art for the story. Seldom does one see a historical subject covered in such depth without getting dull, but Jordan pulls it off beautifully."—James L. Haley, author of Sam Houston

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781574885125
Publisher:
Potomac Books
Publication date:
12/31/2005
Pages:
397
Sales rank:
728,274
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan W. Jordan has written about historical topics for such publications as Military History Magazine and Military History Quarterly. A graduate of Vanderbilt University Law School, he is a practicing attorney. He lives in the Atlanta area.

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