Lone Star Picture Shows

Overview


When a Dallas audience in 1897 viewed the first motion picture ever shown in Texas, the state began a love affair with the movies. From the early nickelodeons to later drive-ins, Texans have spent countless hours and many dollars to watch moving pictures shown in small towns and big cities alike.

In a span of sixty-three years, from 1897 to 1960, Texans witnessed the rise and fall of the silent film, the introduction of “talkies,” the drive-in, and 3-D. They saw how World War ...

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Overview


When a Dallas audience in 1897 viewed the first motion picture ever shown in Texas, the state began a love affair with the movies. From the early nickelodeons to later drive-ins, Texans have spent countless hours and many dollars to watch moving pictures shown in small towns and big cities alike.

In a span of sixty-three years, from 1897 to 1960, Texans witnessed the rise and fall of the silent film, the introduction of “talkies,” the drive-in, and 3-D. They saw how World War II affected the movies and watched movies transform again when the advent of television brought a new kind of competition. They even had their own movie production centers in the early years. El Paso and San Antonio vied in the race to become the nation’s movie capital.

In Lone Star Picture Show Richard Schroeder does more than examine the evolution of the movie industry in Texas - he re-creates the environment of the darkened movie theater. Drawing on interviews with theater managers, cashiers, projectionists, and general workers, Schroeder captures the theater-going experience of the past and uses their recollections to describe life in the movie business throughout the century. Schroder also considers the racial and ethnic makeup of Texas and the movie houses of the Hispanic and African-American communities.

The fascinating and well-written narrative offers a lively glimpse into the movie palaces of the past. Those who would like to remember the days when a nickel bought a Saturday afternoon of entertainment in a palatial, darkened theater will find Lone Star Picture Shows a charming and informative slice of Texana.

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Product Details

Meet the Author


Richard Schroeder, an independent historian with a doctorate in education from Texas A&M University in Commerce, taught communications, broadcasting, and film for eighteen years.
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Table of Contents

List of illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 Storefronts to Nickelodeons: The Beginnings to 1914 3
2 Nickelodeons to De Luxe Theaters: 1908 to 1921 27
3 Grand Movie Palaces: 1921 to 1929 48
4 "Talkies" - Motion Pictures Learn to Speak: 1928 to 1941 81
5 War to Wide Screens: 1941 to 1960 110
App. 1 Texas Motion Picture Theaters 149
App. 2 Texas Motion Picture Stars 173
App. 3 Pioneers of the Texas Motion Picture Theater Industry 175
App. 4 Theater Circuits in Texas in the 1930s 177
Notes 181
Bibliography 189
Index 195
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