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Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection
     

Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection

4.0 8
by John T. Cacioppo, William Patrick
 

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ISBN-10: 0393335283

ISBN-13: 9780393335286

Pub. Date: 08/10/2009

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.

“One of the most important books about the human condition to appear in a decade.”—Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness
University of Chicago social neuroscientist John T. Cacioppo unveils his pioneering research on the startling effects of loneliness: a sense of isolation or social rejection disrupts not only our thinking

Overview

“One of the most important books about the human condition to appear in a decade.”—Daniel Gilbert, author of Stumbling on Happiness
University of Chicago social neuroscientist John T. Cacioppo unveils his pioneering research on the startling effects of loneliness: a sense of isolation or social rejection disrupts not only our thinking abilities and will power but also our immune systems, and can be as damaging as obesity or smoking. A blend of biological and social science, this book demonstrates that, as individuals and as a society, we have everything to gain, and everything to lose, in how well or how poorly we manage our need for social bonds.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393335286
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/10/2009
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
141,815
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.90(d)

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Loneliness: Human Nature and the Need for Social Connection 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first few chapters worried me because the anecdotes seemed overdone and poorly written, but then the writing moved into the authoritative, clean, concise style that lasted the rest of the book, so I enjoyed the writing overall. There is a ton of interesting information, lots of research and studies explained in the book. This isn't a one-night read, some of the information takes a little while to process so don't be surprised if you read some of the paragraphs several times, especially if you're surrounded by distractions. But definitely worth the time it took to get through it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loving this book and still reading it! So many insights into why I've chosen the paths I've taken. Now, If I could just figure out how to correct my trajectory. I highly recomment this book as required reading for all "loners". It does as it promises and sheds light on why humans must have social connections. Many of the atrocities we see far too often would never have happened if the individuals responsible had not been socially inept.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Provides insight into maladaptive behaviors in the context of loneliness and the innate drive to connect with others. The authors clearly connect how fear of, and experience with loneliness works towards the progression of isolating behaviors, which further isolate and confirm feelings of loneliness. The suggestions for interventions is not as comprehensive as the explanation of the etiology of the feeling and experience.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Agree whole-heartedly with the 4 reviewers below. Eye opening description of a phenomenon which has been the neglected little brother of depression. Each paragraph is loaded with an epiphany about this monster that's been hiding in plain sight. Although this book is weak on the therapeutic side, it's been a tremendous service in educating us about the complexity and prevalence of our loneliness epidemic. I like how the authors meld together anthropology, experimental psychology, and pathophysiology. It's demanding reading, and thus a little slow-going. But, it's essential material for therapists, public health & policy leaders, the loved one's of the lonely, and the sufferers themselves.
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