Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama
  • Alternative view 1 of Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama
  • Alternative view 2 of Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama
  • Alternative view 3 of Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama
  • Alternative view 4 of Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama
<Previous >Next

Long and Uncertain Journey: The 27,000 Mile Voyage of Vasco Da Gama

by Joan Elizabeth Goodman, Tom McNeely
     
 

Five years after Columbus sailed off to find a sea route to the Orient, the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama went on the same quest. His epic, 27,000 mile journey around the bottom of Africa was filled with danger, treachery, sacrifice, cruelty and acts of extraordinary courage. By the time da Gama returned, half his ships were gone, and two thirds of his crew

…  See more details below

Overview

Five years after Columbus sailed off to find a sea route to the Orient, the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama went on the same quest. His epic, 27,000 mile journey around the bottom of Africa was filled with danger, treachery, sacrifice, cruelty and acts of extraordinary courage. By the time da Gama returned, half his ships were gone, and two thirds of his crew were dead, but he had found what Columbus had not.

Da Gama brought back tales of East African and Asian marketplaces overflowing with riches, of rulers who wore emeralds and rubies and pearls the size of grapes, of ships and cannons that were no match for those of the Portuguese. Portugal would soon send more ships and more cannons. The rest of Europe would follow. And the world would never be the same.

Joan Elizabeth Goodman's narrative captures both the drama of da Gama's voyage and its central place in world history. Tom McNeely's fluid watercolors give the reader a visceral sense of an unknown world unfolding before the explorer's eyes.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review
Entertaining and informative.... Joan Elizabeth Goodman blends a compelling, dramatic narrative with Tom McNeely's superbly drawn watercolors giving readers age 8 to 18 a memorable and enjoyable "window in time" to one of the truly outstanding feats in history.
Washington Post - Abby McGanney Nolan
Well researched and written with details that make these distant figures and achievements memorable.
Resource Links - Connie Forst
A fascinating book on the history of Portuguese exploration ... stunning artwork throughout complements the text very well.
Horn Book Guide
Lush watercolor illustrations and a regal design add drama ... Goodman tells the story with flair and balance.
Booklist - Susan Dove Lempke
STARRED REVIEW: The story is a fascinating one ... McNeely's full-page illustrations vibrate with life and action ... A concluding time line and an index help make this a good resource for reports, but the book is also intelligently written and exciting.
Connie Forst
A fascinating book on the history of Portuguese exploration ... stunning artwork throughout complements the text very well.
Delia A. Culberson
This slender, easy-to-read volume, filled with danger, courage, and treachery, is an exciting adventure tale.
Ann Welton
The balanced presentation ... is compellingly written and makes interesting reading.
—School Library Journal, July 2001
Abby McGanney Nolan
Well researched and written with details that make these distant figures and achievements memorable. —Washington Post
Children's Literature
In 1497, Vasco da Gama departed from Portugal with four ships, in search of the wealth of Asia. Two years later, he returned home with only two vessels and one third of his crewmen. In his voyage of discovery, Vasco da Gama traveled all the way to India and back. While he failed to bring back riches, he did set the stage for the establishment of a Portuguese Empire that stretched all the way across the Indian Ocean. Da Gama also took with him the cruelty that marked so much of the European colonization of vast portions of the world. Even though he was a staunch Christian, da Gama did not hesitate to use torture, murder and other acts of violence to spread the power of Portugal. Eventually, the Portuguese Empire fell prey to the greed of other nations who were now more powerful. But that ultimate defeat should not lessen our amazement at the two-year journey of this explorer and his men. Vasco da Gama's voyage is well chronicled in this beautifully illustrated book. The narrative text is carefully crafted and flows along in a steady manner. The color illustrations highlight the story without over shadowing it. 2001, Mikaya Press, $19.95. Ages 9 to 14. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
VOYA
In a fast-paced narrative complemented by authentic excerpts from a seaman's journal and vivid, full-page illustrations, Goodman captures the fifteenth-century climate and background of this renowned Portuguese explorer's amazing two-year journey. Gama's epic voyage accomplished the goal that had eluded Christopher Columbus—the discovery of a sea route to the fabled spice-rich Orient. Although Gama occasionally pulled into friendly ports, such as Malindi in Mozambique, for the most part, the reception he received along the way was chilly or outright hostile. He returned to Lisbon in 1498 with only half of his ships, one-third of his men, and meager samples of the prized spices. His tales of luxurious palaces, magnificent jewels, and rich marketplaces overflowing with exotic goods and the long-coveted spices only heightened his king's desire for further explorations. Larger, better-armed ships followed, and the Portuguese eventually ruled parts of East Africa, the Arabian Gulf, and Far East islands. Portugal's far-flung empire would be shortlived, but her sailors' momentous achievements changed the world forever. This slender, easy-to-read volume, filled with danger, courage, and treachery, is an exciting adventure tale that teaches important historical and geographical facts. Two helpful features are the foldout map with which readers can follow Gama's circuitous route, and the time line. Although its initial appeal might be greatest to middle school students, the eye-catching, full-color cover and pictures and lively text will ensnare other adventure lovers, including reluctant readers. Index. Illus. Maps. Charts. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M (Better than most, marred only byoccasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8). 2001, Firefly Books, 48p, $19.95. Ages 12 to 14. Reviewer: Delia A. Culberson SOURCE: VOYA, August 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 3)
School Library Journal
Gr 5-7-Lavish, earth-toned watercolor illustrations extend a lucid, interesting text that details the initial 1497 voyage of Vasco da Gama around Africa to the Orient. Beginning with background on Portuguese exploration, navigation, and the role of Prince Henry the Navigator, the running narrative includes sidebars taken from the journal of one of da Gama's crew members-an excellent example of primary-source material. The objective presentation is matter-of-fact regarding the explorer's brutality and ignorance in dealing with the indigenous populations of Africa and the Near East. However, the author still manages to maintain a focus on the bravery and persistence of the man and his crew. The balanced presentation, which concludes with a summation of the remainder of da Gama's career and the fall of the Portuguese overseas empire, is compellingly written and makes interesting reading. A note on The Lus'ads, an epic poem about da Gama by 16th-century poet Lu's Vaz de Camoes, rounds out this volume. Coupled with Leonard Everett Fisher's Prince Henry the Navigator (Macmillan, 1990; o.p.), it provides a solid introduction to the grand era of Portuguese navigation.-Ann Welton, Terminal Park Elementary School, Auburn, WA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
A Long And Uncertain Journey is the entertaining and informative picturebook story of Vasco da Gama's 27,000 mile exploratory journey in 1497. Sailing to discover a route to China just five years after Christopher Columbus, Vasco da Gama discovered what Columbus had not — a sea route from Europe to China. Elizabeth Goodman blends a compelling, dramatic narrative with Tom McNeely's superbly drawn watercolors giving readers age 8 to 18 a memorable and enjoyable "window in time" to one of the truly outstanding feats in history.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780965049375
Publisher:
Mikaya Press
Publication date:
07/29/2013
Series:
Great Explorers Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
990L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Joan Elizabeth Goodman is the author of the first book in The Great Explorers series -- Beyond the Sea of Ice. She lives in New York City.

Tom McNeely's work has appeared in the United States, Canada, Britain, Europe and Asia. He has won awards from the Society of Illustrators, The Art Directors Club of New York, The Art Directors Club of Toronto and Communication Arts Magazine. He has also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from The Canadian Association of Photographers and Illustrators in Communications. He lives and works in Toronto.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >