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Black and Blue: Sandy Koufax, the Robinson Boys, and the World Series That Stunned America
     

Black and Blue: Sandy Koufax, the Robinson Boys, and the World Series That Stunned America

4.2 12
by Tom Adelman
 

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"Richly layered....An entertaining and informative portrait of two underappreciated teams in an unforgettable time."--Boston Sunday Globe

The most surprising World Series ever? Many baseball fans would agree that it was the epic 1966 clash between the reigning champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the perennial underdog Baltimore Orioles.

The godlike

Overview

"Richly layered....An entertaining and informative portrait of two underappreciated teams in an unforgettable time."--Boston Sunday Globe

The most surprising World Series ever? Many baseball fans would agree that it was the epic 1966 clash between the reigning champion Los Angeles Dodgers and the perennial underdog Baltimore Orioles.

The godlike Sandy Koufax had led the Dodgers to victory in two previous World Series, and had finished the season with twenty-seven wins, a personal best. Few outside Baltimore gave the Orioles - slugger Frank Robinson leading a young team of no-name kids and promising prospects - more than a fighting chance against such series veterans as Koufax, Don Drysdale, Maury Wills, and the rest. Experts were betting that Los Angeles would sweep it in four. What transpired instead astonished the nation, as the greatest pitching performance in World Series history capped a redemption beyond imagining.

"Guaranteed to score a home run." -Essence

"Astonishing. . . . Adelman goes way past the box scores to get information that makes the players more human and the games more dramatic." -San Diego Union-Tribune

"Black and Blue delivers good baseball action, ownerly perfidy, and social context." -Boston Globe

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316075435
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
05/30/2010
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
348,961
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Tom Adelman is the author of the national bestseller The Long Ball. He has also written several novels and works of music criticism. Adelman and his family live in Princeton, New Jersey.

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Long Ball: The Summer of '75 -- Spaceman, Catfish, Charlie Hustle, and the Greatest World Series Ever Played 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a great read -- even a page-turner as the World Series reaches its nail-biting climax! I really loved it, despite knowing very little about baseball and sports in general (as my husband can attest). Adelman tells wonderful stories about the players as human beings -- like Luis Tiant and his parents, and Carl Yastrzemski. He not only uncovers such great stories, he writes them beautifully, making you care about all of the players. He is also attentive to context, making this a book about much more than just baseball games. Adelman offers reflections on racial tensions in Boston in 1970s, on the importance of baseball in the relationship of fathers and sons, and on the difficulties of being married to a player. In other words, his players are human first, even as he chronicles an amazing year of baseball. That's why I enjoyed it, despite the fact that I hardly ever read baseball books. Just a thrilling, fun ride to live the season vicariously!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I must say I was reluctant to give this book a chance. I thought it may be a book written by an amateur to exploit the New England population's excitement over everything Red Sox. I had never heard of Adelman and being a bit of a snob didn't think he could match any of the great sports writers who have covered the Red Sox in book form. However, I started reading it late one night and as it got later and later I realized I had discovered a real gem. This book goes beyond the box scores and play by play (without ignoring them) and gives us a fascinating portrait of the baseball personalities from the greatest season (1975) of a golden era (pre-millionaire dominated baseball). That's what I loved about this book which I am not sure could be written about the current players. Most of the players now are too media savvy to reveal anything quirky or unique about themselves. Adelman recants the inside stories about great players (Yaz, Brett, Stargell, Rose) that make us see them as real people. More interestingly perhaps, he tells the stories of the real players (Carbo,Bill Lee, Denny Doyle) that make us see them as great! At a time (the 2003 playoffs) when I wanted to augment my baseball mood, this book was a blessing. My only complaint is that I became so fascinated by the players that I was disappointed that the epilogue did not include an update which would tell how some of the promising careers evolved and flourished and why some fizzled. Maybe I'll find it in the paperback. Thank you Mr. Adelman.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Baseball is an elegant and captivating sport. And Long Ball is an elegant and captivating book. It's the best baseball book -- hell, its the best sports book -- I've read in a long time. Tom Adelman makes baseball come alive. The players, managers and owners become flesh and blood. You care about them and their families. I think Adelman is the next Roger Angell. I've bought this book as birthday and Father's Day gifts for my friends. They all love the book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is ambitious and honest and very modern. There are only a few authors and broadcasters who can turn a game into a compelling story of character. Tom Adelman does that and more. The season of 1975 is told like a novel, peopled with the perspectives of ballplayers, their fathers, their wives, their sons, their fans, their managers, their umpires, and many others. The narrative floats like poetry. Memories unfold. The language is gorgeous, and Adelman¿s extensive research is apparent; everything feels completely authentic. I¿m a huge baseball fan (Let¿s Go, Detroit!) and I noticed only a very few errors which, in a book of nearly 400 pages, with several facts in every sentence, is truly impressive. This is a winner, a sports book that anyone, fan or not, can enjoy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a mess, from its unartful organization to the dozens of factual errors throughout - really, there are so many errors, and so many significant ones, that byb the end of the book I was actually checking the scores of the games of the Series (they were correct). As a Red Sox fan, I found it lacking, and I suspect Reds fans will have the same reaction. The author's premise in regard to free agency and the 1975 seasons is flawed from the start - he just doesn't know his baseball history and doesn't seem to really care. A very disappointing book, made worse by the fact that commercial reviewers seem unaware of its many factual mistakes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WAZZUP
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enoy all Red Sox books and I enjoyed this one, despite the fact that the ending does not change for the better, and makes me break into a cold sweat. Read this and then Bill Lee's THE LITTLE RED (SOX) BOOK, in which the ending (finally) does change!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's almost summer--can't you smell the sizzling onions and peppers from a street-vendor sausage? Anticipation and cold soda in front of Gate A as you wait for Fenway to open its turnstiles to a world of history and green grass and Boston's team, always and forever the boys of summer? That is what this book is about. It's about loving baseball, it's about fathers and sons, it's about tradition and the beauty of the sport. It's about an incredible World Series that captured the imagination of a nation. If you're looking for cold lists of stats, this is not your book. If, however, you want a warm and wonderful look at an incredible era in baseball, you've certainly come across a gem.