Long Island Noir [NOOK Book]

Overview

“The Shiny Car in the Night” by Nick Mamatas has been selected for inclusion in The Best American Mystery Stories 2013, edited by Otto Penzler and Lisa Scottoline

"There is plenty of mayhem for fans of dark fiction in the pages of Long Island Noir: shootings, killings, all manner of brutality...Suburbia may be even meaner than the big ...
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Long Island Noir

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Overview

“The Shiny Car in the Night” by Nick Mamatas has been selected for inclusion in The Best American Mystery Stories 2013, edited by Otto Penzler and Lisa Scottoline

"There is plenty of mayhem for fans of dark fiction in the pages of Long Island Noir: shootings, killings, all manner of brutality...Suburbia may be even meaner than the big city."
--The New York Times

"Akashic’s Long Island volume in its regional noir series offers an eclectic and effective mix of seasoned pros (Reed Farrel Coleman, Tim McLoughlin, Sarah Weinman) and new voices (Qanta Ahmed, JZ Holden, Amani Scipio). The 17 contributors portray a wonderful diversity of people driven to extremes . . ."
--Publishers Weekly

Original stories by: Jules Feiffer, Matthew McGevna, Nick Mamatas, Kaylie Jones, Qanta Ahmed, Charles Salzberg, Reed Farrel Coleman, Tim McLoughlin, Sarah Weinman, JZ Holden, Richie Narvaez, Sheila Kohler, Jane Ciabattari, Steven Wishnia, Kenneth Wishnia, Amani Scipio, and Tim Tomlinson.

Kaylie Jones moved to Sagaponack, New York, in 1975, where her family continued to live for more than thirty years. She is the author of five novels, including A Soldier's Daughter Never Cries and the memoir Lies My Mother Never Told Me. She teaches in the MFA program at Stony Brook Southampton and in the Wilkes University low-residency MFA program in professional writing.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Akashic’s Long Island volume in its regional noir series offers an eclectic and effective mix of seasoned pros (Reed Farrel Coleman, Tim McLoughlin, Sarah Weinman) and new voices (Qanta Ahmed, JZ Holden, Amani Scipio). The 17 contributors portray a wonderful diversity of people driven to extremes, from Pakistani immigrant Anjali Osmaan, sent to “Amreekah” as a bride for an uncaring husband in Ahmed’s moving “Anjali’s America,” to the children of Southern migrants in Scipio’s despairing “Jabo’s.” Coleman’s “Mastermind,” in which a “wannabe” plans a perfect robbery, elicits sympathy for the poor fool. In Jane Ciabattari’s “Contents of House,” the victim of a mean-spirited divorce seeks a very tasty revenge. Steven Wishnia’s “Semiconscious” exposes the destructiveness of ultra–right-wing patriots’ response to immigrants, while in Kenneth Wishnia’s “Blood Drive” a laid-off construction worker finds new use for his work-hardened muscles. Jones’s succinct introduction aptly points to The Great Gatsby “as the first noir novel of Long Island.” (May)
Kirkus Reviews
Longtime Long Islander Jones has collected a volume of 17 new stories as diverse as the massive island itself. Characters traveling to Long Island abound here. In Charles Salzberg's "A Starr Burns Bright," a man named Swann takes the LIRR out to Long Beach for a day to drop off a package for his old friend Goldblatt. Meanwhile, the local cops stop Nick, who's bound for Westhampton Beach in Matthew McGevna's "Gateway to the Stars," before he can get to the Dune Road mansion where his underage brother Jeffrey is headed for a weekend of "true Dionysian worship." Other characters come to Long Island to spend their so-called golden years. Sheila Kohler's "Terror" settles its heroine in Amagansett, where she and her husband bought a second home when land was cheap. Kaylie Jones (the book's editor) sends a writer and his second wife from Manhattan to Wainscott in "Home Invasion," only to reveal a questionable environment for his teenage daughter. And in "Past President," Sarah Weinman shows a retired cop that there's always room for crime in privileged Great Neck. A few characters come from very far away. In Amani Scipio's "Jabo's," May and Shangy hop a watermelon truck in Georgia and discover that even the Hamptons have a wrong side of town. And Qanta Ahmed turns the American dream into a nightmare for a bride from Pakistan in "Anjali's America." The best of these tales are perceptive glimpses into how people live out the choices they make. The worst are pointless recitations of one disaster after the other. No one escapes unscathed, but some wounds are redemptive; others just bleed.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781617751158
  • Publisher: Akashic Books
  • Publication date: 4/30/2012
  • Series: Akashic Noir Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 682,402
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Kaylie Jones
Kaylie Jones: Kaylie Jones moved to Sagaponack in 1975, where her family continued to live for more than thirty years. She is the author of five novels, including A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries, and the memoir Lies My Mother Never Told Me. She teaches in the MFA program at Stony Brook Southampton, and in the Wilkes University low-residency MFA program in professional writing.

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Read an Excerpt

Long Island Noir


Akashic Books

Copyright © 2012 Akashic Books
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-61775-062-5


Introduction

A New Kind of Greedy Tension

Summers in the Hamptons were always wild and crazy, even in the late '70s when my family moved out east to Sagaponack. On the weekends in July and August the crowds would surge in from up the island and the city, and the bars, restaurants, and beaches were abuzz with an easygoing excitement rife with possibility. But as the Hamptons became more popular with a richer crowd—Hollywood stars, financial magnates, even politicians—a new kind of greedy tension filled the air, and even the locals were infected. Once, when I was out visiting my mother, I overheard a guy I'd known in high school, a builder, telling people at a bar that last year he'd put in a brand-new brick deck for this CEO prick's wife, but this year the guy's new girlfriend wanted to make a statement, so she told the builder to tear out the bricks and put in a cedar deck instead. "I told her $150,000," he laughed. "She didn't blink an eye." Then he tried to sell us the bricks.

Pretty soon the fields in Sagaponack were gone, replaced by mansions, each one bigger than the last, as if it were some kind of pumpkin-growing contest. And still, no one seemed content; not on the beach, where mobile phones were constantly ringing; not in line at the supermarket or outside the nightclubs; and certainly not stopped dead in stultifying mid-day traffic. Well, it's still traffic, whether you're in a Mercedes-Benz or a Honda Civic. Now, the truly rich fly out in private planes, adding to the general racket.

It's almost as if the whole world has caught Gatsbyitis. And what an amazing, prescient book that was. The Great Gatsby could be seen as the first noir novel of Long Island—a poor boy who doesn't have two cents to rub together falls for a rich girl who would never marry him. So he makes himself a massive fortune the only way he can—illegally. And buys himself a mansion on Long Island. Despite his fortune he is never truly accepted, never truly safe, comfortable, or content. And of course, she leaves him because he'll never be part of her set.

F. Scott Fitzgerald's mansions of Great Neck and Little Neck are still there, lording imposingly over their lesser neighbors. The American dream of suburban bliss has never died, only grown more desperate, more materialistic, and less romantic as it has shoved its way further east, until now there is literally nowhere left to go. The Hamptons I knew and loved are gone forever.

The most die-hard fans of noir fiction may find a few of these stories a little gris. Not everyone here is literally down and out, though spiritually, they'll give you a run for your money. A wealthy grandmother abandons her young grandson on a public beach in a moment of rage, putting his life in danger. A Northport hood is willing to murder his own brother for ratting out the local mob. An upper-class Pakistani woman almost dies in childbirth, a victim of severe marital abuse, yet she refuses to speak out. The president of a wealthy synagogue robs his donors blind in a ponzi scheme, including his staunchest supporter, a Holocaust survivor. They are all characters driven by some twisted notion of the American Dream, which they feel they must achieve at any cost. This is real-life noir. These people are our neighbors.

* * *

I heard this story at a dinner party once. Kurt Vonnegut, who lived on our street in Sagaponack and was a family friend I wish I'd known better, was invited to a summer cocktail party at the Hamptons home of some billionaire CEO. At the party, someone asked Kurt, "How does it feel to know this guy makes more money in a day than you will ever make in your lifetime?" After a moment, Kurt responded calmly that he didn't mind at all, because he had something the CEO would never have.

"What's that?" the person challenged.

"Enough."

These are stories about people who will never feel they have enough, whether they have everything they ever dreamed of, or nothing at all.

Kaylie Jones February 2012

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Long Island Noir Copyright © 2012 by Akashic Books. Excerpted by permission of Akashic Books. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

PART I: FAMILY VALUES....................17
Matthew McGevna Gateway to the Stars Mastic Beach....................32
Nick Mamatas Thy Shiny Car in the Night Northport....................42
Kaylie Jones Home Invasion Wainscott....................55
PART II: HITTING IT BIG....................75
Charles Salzberg A Starr Burns Bright Long Beach....................93
Reed Farrel Coleman Mastermind Selden....................107
Tim McLoughlin Seven Eleven Wantagh....................117
PART III: LOVE AND OTHER HORRORS....................143
Jules Feiffer Boob Noir Southampton....................149
JZ Holden Summer Love Sagaponack....................167
Richie Narvaez Ending in Paumanok Stony Brook....................182
Sheila Kohler Terror Amagansett....................199
PART IV: AMERICAN DREAMERS....................211
Steven Wishnia Semiconscious Lake Ronkonkoma....................233
Kenneth Wishnia Blood Drive Port Jefferson Station....................247
Amani Scipio Jabo's Bridgehampton....................258
Tim Tomlinson Snow Job Wading River....................284
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 19, 2012

    real life dark fiction

    About 20 years ago I read alot of noir. Worked my way through Cornell Woolrich, Some Hammet and the like. Off and on through the years I would pick some up, Jack O'Connell being a contemporary favorite. Not too often, though. When I saw this in ER, I decided to give it a try.
    Some of the stories brought back fond noir memories and some not so much.
    My favorite would have to be 'Gateway to the Stars', a story of misplaced family loyalty. We all have family members somewhere making bad decisions and if we're not careful, helping them can get us into trouble of some kind.
    The poorest choice, in my opinion, was 'Summer Love'. I didn't think it belonged in this collection as it seemed to me to be short fiction from some "popular" women's magazine.
    If you like real world dark fiction I recommend this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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