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Long Life: Essays and Other Writings
     

Long Life: Essays and Other Writings

4.2 5
by Mary Oliver
 

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Poets must read and study, but also they must learn to tilt and whisper, shout, or dance, each in his or her own way, or we might just as well copy the old books. But, no, that would never do, for always the new self swimming around in the old world feels itself uniquely verbal. And that is just the point: how the world, moist and bountiful, calls to each of us to

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Poets must read and study, but also they must learn to tilt and whisper, shout, or dance, each in his or her own way, or we might just as well copy the old books. But, no, that would never do, for always the new self swimming around in the old world feels itself uniquely verbal. And that is just the point: how the world, moist and bountiful, calls to each of us to make a new and serious response. That's the big question, the one the world throws at you every morning. 'Here you are, alive. Would you like to make a comment?' This book is my comment.--from the Foreword.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"I would rather write poems than prose, any day, any place" writes Mary Oliver, "Yet each has its own force." Her Long Life: Essays and Other Writings intersperses a few verses among prose pieces as various as "Dog Talk," "Emerson: An Introduction" and "Where I Live." As "Sand Dabs, Nine" puts it, "The energy of attempt is greater than the surety of stasis." Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Oliver is best known for her collections of poetry (e.g., The Leaf and the Cloud). She is also the author of A Poetry Handbook, one of the quintessential tools of encouragement, advice, and direction for the budding poet. In this arresting anthology of 17 essays and ten poems, similar in style to Sarah Orne Jewett's The Country of the Pointed Firs, Oliver takes her time word painting charmingly simple yet deeply enduring pictures of interactions among women and men, animals, and nature. She appears to etch each line with ease, which is the stamp of the professional, pointing out that prose is the softened, fleshy story, while poetry remains the stark revelation in writing. Each word touches the next, forming a virtual symphony of visuals. Daily tasks become touching rituals that define who we are, while the mundane is made sparkling, sometimes sharp, and even shattering yet never dull or lost owing to repetition. Recommended for large public and academic poetry and literary collections. Kim Harris, Rochester P.L., NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786739486
Publisher:
Da Capo Books
Publication date:
03/02/2005
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
120
Sales rank:
602,528
File size:
258 KB

Meet the Author

Mary Oliver is the author of twenty books, including The Leaf and the Cloud and What Do We Know. Her many accolades include the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. She lives in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

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Long Life: Essays and Other Writings 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was a bit fast and cliche and rushed and not enough depth but otherqise it was good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bur really rushed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Chapter 1: (u would not know how this happened without reading the prolouge in result 2.) Karatekit landed in hurricane island, not knowing how that rouge got him here so fast. All the other clan cats of hurricaneclan looked at him. Mistyflower (now mistystar) looked at me and told me to join hurricaneclan. He said yes then blacktail came over. "Ok. Karatekit. You are karatepaw" blacktail meowed. Karatepaw bowed in thanks then went to him. "Can we start training today?" I asked him and he said yes. We went to the training area and thought 'i WILL be a warrior sometime. I WILL be a good one too!' He then padded over to where blacktail was and asked. "What first?" "Lets try something simple. Catching a mouse" he said and demonstrated how. Karatepaw went up to a mouse and cornered it and pounced it. He then kills it in a swift bite. "Good job karatepaw! Come tommorow to learn fighting techneiques." Blacktail said.||||| end of chapter 1. Chapter two will be in result 3