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The Long Way Home
     

The Long Way Home

3.7 14
by Rachel Spangler
 

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They say you can’t go home again, but Raine St. James doesn’t know why anyone would want to.

Rory St. James was disowned after she came out at seventeen. She rebounded by moving to Chicago, changing her name to Raine and putting down her hometown to audiences around the country. Now, ten years later, too old to be considered a gay youth, broke,

Overview


They say you can’t go home again, but Raine St. James doesn’t know why anyone would want to.

Rory St. James was disowned after she came out at seventeen. She rebounded by moving to Chicago, changing her name to Raine and putting down her hometown to audiences around the country. Now, ten years later, too old to be considered a gay youth, broke, evicted, and fresh off a much needed break-up, Raine St. James is forced to accept a job teaching at Bramble University in Darlington, the town she’s been publicly bashing for the last decade.

Beth Devoroux was born and raised in Darlington. Despite losing her parents at a young age, she has been nurtured by the people of the town and is well loved by everyone who knows her. She leads a comfortable life with good job at Bramble University, a long-term but closeted relationship, friends that she can count on, and everything she thinks she wants, so why is she so drawn to a rabble-rouser like Raine St. James?

Can Raine and Beth face their pasts and come to terms with their differences in order to have any hope for a future together?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781602821781
Publisher:
Bold Strokes Books
Publication date:
09/14/2010
Pages:
264
Sales rank:
901,569
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


Rachel and her partner, Susan, are raising their young son in western New York, where during the winter they make the most of the lake effect snow on local ski slopes, a hobby that inspired her second novel, Trails Merge. In the summer, they love to travel and watch their beloved St. Louis Cardinals. Regardless of the season, she always makes time for a good romance, whether she’s reading it, writing it, or living it.

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The Long Way Home 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
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Sage320 More than 1 year ago
Rachel Spangler has created a strong romance in The Long Way Home, but she also has s book that explores a deeper topic. The reader can have two experiences for the price of one. What makes this book more than just a regular romance is the way Spangler has it deal with Raine's and Beth's experiences with the town. Reality is what a person perceives it to be, but if people look through separate prisms, the views are very different. Beth sees a town of kind, nurturing people, for the most part. Raine sees only negative experiences, led by her family. As time passes in the book however, both of their perceptions begin to change. Beth begins to realize how restricted her life has been, through her own actions and those of others. The biggest change comes in Raine who comes to realize that there were good times earlier in her life. Now that she's older and more experienced, she sees the events differently than when she was young. The Long Way Home does not mean home in the sense of the town. Both Raine and Beth have to come home to themselves. They have grown and matured and now that maturity affects their relationships with the past, the people in the town and each other. These aren't static characters. They expand in potential as the reader works through the story. The romance is there, but the better story is about how the "clarity" of childhood may be nothing more than a misunderstanding.