Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 2

Longman Anthology of British Literature, Vol. 2

by David Damrosch, Clare et. al (Eds.) Carroll, Christorpher Baswell, William Chapman Sharpe, Anne Howland Schotter
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321011740

ISBN-13: 9780321011749

Pub. Date: 07/23/1998

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

The Longman Anthology of British Literature is the first new anthology of British literature to appear in over 25 years. A major work of scholarship, it brings together an extraordinary collection of writings spanning some 1300 years of literary history from the Middle Ages to the present. Volume One covers The Middle Ages, The Early Modern Period, and The

Overview

The Longman Anthology of British Literature is the first new anthology of British literature to appear in over 25 years. A major work of scholarship, it brings together an extraordinary collection of writings spanning some 1300 years of literary history from the Middle Ages to the present. Volume One covers The Middle Ages, The Early Modern Period, and The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century. The text aims to give a less monumental, more contextualized presentation of British literature. The traditional canonical writers are fully represented, with coverage of such central figures as Spencer, Milton, and Shakespeare. But alongside these are numerous other literary voices, especially those of women. The most distinctive feature of the anthology are groupings of texts that allow contemporary social, political, and literary controversies to unfold in the voices of those who participated in them, thus enabling the great works of British literature to be taught in the context of their times.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321011749
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
07/23/1998
Series:
HarperCollins Introduction to British Literature Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
2982
Product dimensions:
6.42(w) x 9.25(h) x 2.47(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xxxiii(6)
Acknowledgments xxxix
The Romantics and Their Contemporaries 2(1030)
ANNA LAETITIA BARBAULD
29(17)
The Mouse's Petition to Dr. Priestley
29(2)
On a Lady's Writing
31(1)
Inscription for an Ice-House
31(1)
To a Little Invisible Being Who Is Expected Soon to Become Visible
32(1)
To the Poor
33(1)
Washing-Day
33(2)
Eighteen Hundred and Eleven
35(8)
The First Fire
43(3)
COMPANION READING John Wilson Croker: from A Review of Eighteen Hundred and Eleven
45(1)
PERSPECTIVES: THE RIGHTS OF MAN AND THE REVOLUTION CONTROVERSY
46(58)
HELEN MARIA WILLIAMS
47(10)
from Letters Written in France, in the Summer of 1790
48(4)
from Letters from France
52(5)
EDMUND BURKE
57(10)
from Reflections on the Revolution in France
58(9)
MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT
67(9)
from A Vindication of the Rights of Men
67(9)
THOMAS PAINE
76(6)
from The Rights of Man
76(6)
WILLIAM GODWIN
82(6)
from An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice and Its Influence on General Virtue and Happiness
83(5)
THE ANTI-JACOBIN
88(4)
The Friend of Humanity and the Knife-Grinder
88(4)
HANNAH MORE
92(7)
Village Politics
92(7)
ARTHUR YOUNG
99(5)
from Travels in France During the Years 1787-1788, and 1789
100(1)
from The Example of France, a Warning to Britain
101(3)
WILLIAM BLAKE
104(45)
All Religions Are One
106(1)
There Is No Natural Religion [a]
107(1)
There Is No Natural Religion [b]
108(2)
SONGS OF INNOCENCE AND OF EXPERIENCE
110(1)
Songs of Innocence
110(9)
Introduction
110(1)
The Ecchoing Green
111(1)
The Lamb
112(1)
The Little Black Boy
113(1)
The Chimney Sweeper
114(1)
The Divine Image
115(1)
HOLY THURSDAY
115(1)
Nurse's Song
116(1)
Infant Joy
116(1)
COMPANION READING Charles Lamb: from The Praise of Chimney-Sweepers
116(3)
Songs of Experience
119(7)
The Fly
119(1)
The COLD & the PEBBLE
120(1)
HOLY THURSDAY
120(1)
The Tyger
120(2)
The Chimney Sweeper
122(1)
The SICK ROSE
122(1)
AH! SUN-FLOWER
123(1)
The GARDEN of LOVE
123(1)
LONDON
123(1)
The Human Abstract
124(1)
INFANT SORROW
124(1)
A POISON TREE
125(1)
A DIVINE IMAGE
126(1)
The Marriage of Heaven and Hell
126(13)
Visions of the Daughters of Albion
139(6)
LETTERS
145(4)
To Dr. John Trusler (23 August 1799)
145(1)
To Thomas Butts (22 November 1802)
146(3)
PERSPECTIVES: THE ABOLITION OF SLAVERY AND THE SLAVE TRADE
149(46)
OLAUDAH EQUIANO
151(6)
from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano
151(6)
MARY PRINCE
157(4)
from The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave
158(3)
THOMAS BELLAMY
161(7)
The Benevolent Planters
161(7)
ANN YEARSLEY
168(4)
from A Poem on the Inhumanity of the Slave-Trade
168(4)
WILLIAM COWPER
172(2)
Sweet Meat Has Sour Sauce
173(1)
HANNAH MORE
174(4)
The Sorrows of Yamba
174(4)
ROBERT SOUTHEY
178(2)
from Poems Concerning the Slave Trade
179(1)
DOROTHY WORDSWORTH
180(1)
from The Grasmere Journals
180(1)
GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON
181(1)
from Detached Thoughts
181(1)
THOMAS CLARKSON
181(9)
from The History of the Rise, Progress, & Accomplishment of the Abolition of the African Slave-Trade by the British Parliament
181(9)
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
190(3)
To Toussaint L'Ouverture
190(1)
To Thomas Clarkson
191(1)
from The Prelude
191(1)
from Humanity
192(1)
Letter to Mary Ann Rawson
192(1)
THE EDINBURGH REVIEW
193(2)
from Abstract of the Information laid on the Table of the House of Commons, on the Subject of the Slave Trade
193(2)
MARY ROBINSON
195(11)
January, 1795
196(2)
Sappho and Phaon
198(2)
4 ("Why, when I gaze on Phaon's beauteous eyes")
198(1)
12 ("Now, o'er the tesselated pavement strew")
199(1)
18 ("Why art thou changed? O Phaon! tell me why?")
199(1)
30 ("O'er the tall cliff that bounds the billowy main")
199(1)
37 ("When, in the gloomy mansion of the dead")
200(1)
The Camp
200(1)
LYRICAL TALES
201(5)
The Haunted Beach
201(2)
London's Summer Morning
203(1)
The Old Beggar
204(2)
MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT
206(41)
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
208(27)
To M. Talleyrand-Perigord, Late Bishop of Autun
208(2)
Introduction
210(3)
from Chapter 1. The Rights and Involved Duties of Mankind Considered
213(3)
from Chapter 2. The Prevailing Opinion of a Sexual Character Discussed
216(11)
from Chapter 3. The Same Subject Continued
227(5)
from Chapter 5. Animadversions on Some of the Writers Who Have Rendered Women Objects of Pity, Bordering on Contempt
232(1)
from Chapter 13. Some Instances of the Folly Which the Ignorance of Women Generates; with Concluding Reflections on the Moral Improvement That a Revolution in Female Manners Might Naturally Be Expected to Produce
233(2)
Maria; or The Wrongs of Woman
235(12)
[Jemima's Story]
235(12)
PERSPECTIVES: THE WOLLSTONECRAFT CONTROVERSY AND THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN
247(40)
CATHERINE MACAULAY
247(3)
from Letters on Education
248(2)
ANNA LAETITIA BARBAULD
250(1)
The Rights of Woman
251(1)
ROBERT SOUTHEY
251(1)
To Mary Wolstoncraft
251(1)
WILLIAM BLAKE
252(1)
from Mary
252(1)
RICHARD POLWHELE
253(5)
from The Unsex'd Females
254(4)
PRISCILLA BELL WAKEFIELD
258(4)
from Reflections on the Present Condition of the Female Sex
258(4)
MARY ANNE RADCLIFFE
262(7)
from The Female Advocate
262(7)
HANNAH MORE
269(6)
from Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education
269(6)
MARY ANNE LAMB
275(4)
Letter to The British Lady's Magazine [On Needlework]
276(3)
WILLIAM THOMPSON and ANNA WHEELER
279(8)
from Appeal of One Half the Human Race, Women, Against the Pretensions of the Other Half, Men, To Retain Them in Political, and Thence in Civil and Domestic Slavery
280(7)
JOANNA BAILLIE
287(11)
Plays on the Passions
287(5)
from Introductory Discourse
287(5)
London
292(1)
A Mother to Her Waking Infant
293(1)
A Child to His Sick Grandfather
294(1)
Thunder
295(2)
Song: Woo'd and Married and A'
297(1)
Literary Ballads 298(734)
RELIQUES OF ANCIENT ENGLISH POETRY
299(2)
Sir Patrick Spence
300(1)
ROBERT BURNS
301(8)
To a Mouse
302(1)
Flow gently, sweet Afton
303(1)
Ae fond kiss
303(1)
Comin' Thro' the Rye (1)
304(1)
Comin' Thro' the Rye (2)
304(1)
Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled
305(1)
Is there for honest poverty
306(1)
A Red, Red Rose
307(1)
Auld Lang Syne
307(1)
The Fornicator. A New Song
308(1)
SIR WALTER SCOTT
309(1)
Lord Randal
309(1)
THOMAS MOORE
310(2)
The harp that once through Tara's halls
310(1)
Believe me, if all those endearing young charms
310(1)
The time I've lost in wooing
311(1)
WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
312(138)
LYRICAL BALLADS (1798)
313(19)
Simon Lee
314(3)
We Are Seven
317(1)
Lines Written in Early Spring
318(1)
The Thorn
319(5)
Note to The Thorn
324(2)
Expostulation and Reply
326(1)
The Tables Turned
326(1)
Old Man Travelling
327(1)
Lines Written a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey
328(4)
LYRICAL BALLADS (1800, 1802)
332(27)
Preface
332(1)
[The Principal Object of the Poems. Humble and Rustic Life]
332(1)
["The Spontaneous Overflow of Powerful Feelings"]
333(1)
[The Language of Poetry]
334(1)
[What Is a Poet?]
335(1)
["Emotion Recollected in Tranquillity"]
336(1)
There was a Boy
336(1)
Strange fits of passion have I known
337(1)
Song (She dwelt among th' untrodden ways)
338(1)
Three years she grew in sun and shower
338(1)
Song (A slumber did my spirit seal)
339(1)
Lucy Gray
340(1)
Poor Susan
341(1)
Nutting
342(1)
Michael
343(11)
COMPANION READINGS Francis Jeffrey: from A Review of Robert Southey's Thalaba
354(3)
Charles Lamb: from Letter to William Wordsworth
357(1)
Charles Lamb: from Letter to Thomas Manning
358(1)
SONNETS, 1802-1807
359(5)
Prefatory Sonnet ("Nuns fret not at their Convent's narrow room")
359(1)
The world is too much with us
360(1)
Composed upon Westminster Bridge, Sept. 3, 1802
360(1)
It is a beauteous Evening
360(1)
I griev'd for Buonaparte
361(1)
London, 1802
361(1)
COMPANION READINGS Charlotte Smith: from Elegiac Sonnets To Melancholy
362(1)
Far on the Sands
362(1)
To Tranquillity
362(1)
Written in the Church Yard at Middleton in Sussex
363(1)
On being cautioned against walking on an headland overlooking the sea
363(1)
THE PRELUDE, OR GROWTH OF A POET'S MIND (1805)
364(66)
Book First. Introduction, Childhood, and School time
365(14)
Book Second. School time continued
379(1)
[Two Consciousnesses]
379(1)
[Blessed Infant Babe]
380(1)
Book Fourth. Summer Vacation
381(1)
[Encounter with a "Dismissed" Soldier]
381(3)
Book Fifth. Books
384(1)
[Meditation on Books. The Dream of the Arab]
384(4)
[A Drowning in Esthwaite's Lake]
388(1)
["The Mystery of Words"]
388(1)
Book Sixth. Cambridge, and the Alps
389(1)
[The Pleasure of Geometric Science]
389(1)
[Arrival in France]
390(2)
[Travelling in the Alps. Simplon Pass]
392(4)
Book Seventh. Residence in London
396(1)
[A Blind Beggar. Bartholomew Fair]
396(3)
Book Ninth. Residence in France
399(1)
[Paris]
399(4)
[Revolution, Royalists, and Patriots]
403(3)
Book Tenth. Residence in France and French Revolution
406(1)
[The Reign of Terror. Confusion. Return to England]
406(4)
[Further Events in France]
410(2)
[The Death of Robespierre and Renewed Optimism]
412(2)
[Britain Declares War on France. The Rise of Napoleon and Imperialist France]
414(4)
COMPANION READING William Wordsworth: from The Prelude (1850)
418(1)
Book Eleventh. Imagination, How Impaired and Restored
418(1)
[Imagination Restored by Nature]
418(2)
["Spots of Time." Two Memories from Childhood and Later Reflections]
420(3)
Book Thirteenth. Conclusion
423(1)
[Climbing Mount Snowdon. Moonlit Vista. Meditation on "Mind," "Self," "Imagination," "Fear," and "Love"]
423(5)
[Concluding Retrospect and Prophecy]
428(2)
Resolution and Independence
430(3)
I wandered lonely as a cloud
433(1)
My heart leaps up
434(1)
Ode: Intimations of Immortality
434(5)
The Solitary Reaper
439(1)
Elegiac Stanzas
440(2)
from Preface to The Excursion
442(5)
COMPANION READINGS William Hazlitt: from The Character of Mr. Wordsworth's New Poem, The Excursion
445(1)
Francis Jeffrey: from A Review of William Wordsworth's Excursion
446(1)
Surprized by joy
447(1)
Mutability
448(1)
Scorn not the sonnet
448(1)
Extempore Effusion upon the Death of James Hogg
448(2)
DOROTHY WORDSWORTH
450(26)
Grasmere--A Fragment
451(2)
Address to a Child
453(1)
Irregular Verses
454(3)
Floating Island
457(1)
Lines Intended for My Niece's Album
458(1)
Thoughts on My Sick-bed
459(1)
When Shall I Tread Your Garden Path?
460(1)
Lines Written (Rather Say Begun) on the Morning of Sunday April 6th
460(2)
The Grasmere Journals
462(6)
[Home Alone]
462(1)
[A Leech Gatherer]
463(1)
[A Woman Beggar]
463(1)
[An Old Soldier]
464(1)
[The Grasmere Mailman]
465(1)
[A Vision of the Moon]
465(1)
[A Field of Daffodils]
466(1)
[A Beggar Woman from Cockermouth]
466(1)
[The Circumstances of "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge"]
467(1)
[The Circumstances of "It is a beauteous evening"]
467(1)
[The Household in Winter, with William's New Wife. Gingerbread]
467(1)
LETTERS
468(8)
To Jane Pollard [A Scheme of Happiness]
468(1)
To Lady Beaumont [A Gloomy Christmas]
469(2)
To Lady Beaumont [Her Poetry, William's Poetry]
471(1)
To Mrs Thomas Clarkson [Household Labors]
472(1)
To Mrs Thomas Clarkson [A Prospect of Publishing]
473(1)
To William Johnson [Mountain-Climbing with a Woman]
473(3)
SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE
476(79)
Sonnet to the River Otter
478(1)
COMPANION READING William Lisle Bowles: To the River Itchin, Near Winton
478(1)
The Eolian Harp
478(2)
This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison
480(2)
The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere (1798)
482(2)
Part 1
482(2)
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1817)
484(17)
COMPANION READINGS William Cowper: The Castaway
499(1)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: from Table Talk
500(1)
Kubla Khan
501(2)
Christabel
503(15)
Frost at Midnight
518(1)
Dejection: An Ode
519(3)
On Donne's Poetry
522(1)
Work Without Hope
522(1)
Constancy to an Ideal Object
523(1)
Epitaph
524(1)
from The Statesman's Manual [Symbol and Allegory]
524(1)
Biographia Literaria
525(12)
Chapter 4
525(1)
[On Lyrical Ballads]
525(1)
[Wordsworth's Earlier Poetry]
525(1)
Chapter 11
526(1)
[The Profession of Literature]
526(2)
Chapter 13
528(1)
[Imagination and Fancy]
528(3)
Chapter 14
531(1)
[Occasion of the Lyrical Ballads--Preface to the Second Edition--The Ensuing Controversy]
531(2)
[Philosophic Definitions of a Poem and Poetry]
533(1)
Chapter 17
533(1)
[Examination of the Tenets Peculiar to Mr. Wordsworth. Rustic Life and Poetic Language]
533(4)
from Jacobinism
537(1)
from Once a Jacobin Always a Jacobin
538(3)
Lectures on Shakespeare
541(14)
[Mechanic vs. Organic Form]
541(1)
[The Character of Hamlet]
542(1)
[Stage Illusion and the Willing Suspension of Disbelief]
543(1)
[Shakespeare's Images]
544(1)
[Othello]
544(2)
COLERIDGE'S LECTURES IN CONTEXT: Shakespeare in the Nineteenth Century
546(1)
Charles Lamb and Mary Lamb Preface to Tales from Shakespeare
546(2)
Charles Lamb from On the Tragedies of Shakespeare
548(3)
William Hazlitt from Lectures on the English Poets
551(1)
from The Characters of Shakespeare's Plays
552(1)
Thomas De Quincey On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth
552(3)
GEORGE GORDON, LORD BYRON
555(96)
She walks in beauty
557(1)
So, we'll go no more a-roving
558(1)
CHILDE HAROLD'S PILGRIMAGE
558(11)
Canto 3
558(1)
[Thunderstorm in Switzerland]
558(2)
[Byron's Strained Idealism. Apostrophe to His Daughter]
560(2)
Canto 4
562(1)
[Rome. Political Hopes]
562(1)
[The Colloseum. The Dying Gladiator]
563(2)
[Apostrophe to the Ocean. Conclusion]
565(2)
COMPANION READINGS John Wilson: from A Review of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
567(1)
John Scott: [Lord Byron's Creations]
568(1)
DON JUAN
569(75)
Dedication
570(4)
Canto 1
574(42)
from Canto 2 [Shipwreck. Juan and Haidee]
616(15)
from Canto 3 [Juan and Haidee. The Poet for Hire]
631(8)
from Canto 7 [Critique of Military "Glory"]
639(1)
from Canto 11 [Juan in England]
640(3)
Stanzas ("When a man hath no freedom to fight for at home")
643(1)
On This Day I Complete My Thirty-Sixth Year
643(1)
LETTERS
644(7)
To Thomas Moore [On Childe Harold]
644(1)
To John Murray [On Don Juan] (6 April 1819)
645(1)
To John Murray [On Don Juan] (12 August 1819)
646(1)
To Douglas Kinnaird [On Don Juan] (26 October 1819)
647(2)
To John Murray [On Don Juan] (16 February 1821)
649(1)
To Augusta Leigh [On His Daughter]
649(2)
PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY
651(55)
To Wordsworth
653(1)
Mont Blanc
653(4)
Hymn to Intellectual Beauty
657(2)
Ozymandias
659(1)
Sonnet: Lift not the painted veil
659(1)
Sonnet: England in 1819
660(1)
The Mask of Anarchy
660(10)
Ode to the West Wind
670(2)
To a Sky-Lark
672(3)
To--("Music, when soft voices die")
675(1)
Adonais
675(17)
COMPANION READINGS George Gordon, Lord Byron: from Don Juan
690(1)
George Gordon, Lord Byron: Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley
691(1)
George Gordon, Lord Byron: Letter to John Murray
691(1)
Hellas
692(3)
Chorus ("Worlds on worlds are rolling ever")
692(2)
Chorus ("The world's great age begins anew")
694(1)
from A Defence of Poetry
695(11)
FELICIA HEMANS
706(30)
TALES AND HISTORICAL SCENES, IN VERSE
707(6)
The Wife of Asdrubal
707(2)
The Last Banquet of Antony and Cleopatra
709(4)
Evening Prayer, at a Girls' School
713(1)
Casabianca
714(2)
RECORDS OF WOMAN
716(12)
The Bride of the Greek Isles
716(5)
Properzia Rossi
721(3)
Indian Woman's Death-Song
724(1)
Joan of Arc, in Rheims
725(3)
The Homes of England
728(1)
The Graves of a Household
729(1)
Corinne at the Capitol
730(1)
Woman and Fame
731(5)
COMPANION READINGS Francis Jeffrey: from A Review of Felicia Hemans's Poetry
732(3)
William Wordsworth: from Prefatory Note to Extempore Effusion on the Death of James Hogg
735(1)
JOHN CLARE
736(10)
Written in November (1)
737(1)
Written in November (2)
738(1)
Songs Eternity
738(1)
[The Lament of Swordy Well]
739(5)
[The Mouse's Nest]
744(1)
Clock a Clay
744(1)
"I Am"
745(1)
JOHN KEATS
746(64)
On First Looking into Chapman's Homer
748(2)
COMPANION READINGS Alexander Pope: from Homer's Iliad
748(1)
George Chapman: from Homer's Iliad
749(1)
Alexander Pope: from Homer's Odyssey
749(1)
George Chapman: from Homer's Odyssey
749(1)
On the Grasshopper and Cricket
750(1)
from Sleep and Poetry
750(7)
COMPANION READINGS John Gibson Lockhart: from On the Cockney School of Poetry
752(3)
John Gibson Lockhart: from The Cockney School of Poetry
755(2)
On Seeing the Elgin Marbles
757(1)
On Sitting Down to Read KingLear Once Again
757(1)
Sonnet: When I have fears
758(1)
The Eve of St. Agnes
758(10)
La Belle Dame sans Mercy
768(1)
Incipit Altera Sonneta ("If by dull rhymes")
769(1)
THE ODES OF 1819
770(10)
Ode to Psyche
771(2)
Ode to a Nightingale
773(2)
Ode on a Grecian Urn
775(1)
Ode on Indolence
776(2)
Ode on Melancholy
778(1)
To Autumn
779(1)
The Fall of Hyperion: A Dream
780(13)
This living hand
793(1)
Bright Star
793(1)
LETTERS
794(16)
To Benjamin Bailey ["The Truth of Imagination"]
794(1)
To George and Thomas Keats ["Intensity" and "Negative Capability"]
795(1)
To John Hamilton Reynolds [Wordsworth and "The Whims of an Egotist"]
796(1)
To John Taylor ["a few Axioms"]
797(1)
To Benjamin Bailey ["ardent pursuit"]
797(1)
To John Hamilton Reynolds [Wordsworth, Milton, and "dark Passages"]
798(3)
To Benjamin Bailey ["I have not a right feeling towards Women"]
801(1)
To Richard Woodhouse [The "Camelion Poet" vs. The "Egotistical Sublime"]
801(2)
To George and Georgiana Keats ["Indolence," "Poetry" vs. "Philosophy," the "Vale of Soul-Making"]
803(4)
To Fanny Brawne ["You Take Possession of Me"]
807(1)
To Percy Bysshe Shelley ["An Artist Must Serve Mammon"]
808(1)
To Charles Brown [Keats's Last Letter]
809(1)
MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT SHELLEY
810(148)
Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus (1818)
811(116)
Frankenstein (1831)
927(31)
Introduction
927(4)
from Volume 1, Chapter 1
931(1)
COMPANION READINGS Percy Bysshe Shelley: from Alastor, or The Spirit of Solitude
932(6)
Mary Shelley: Journal Entries
938(1)
Mary Shelley: from Letter to Edward John Trelawny (April 1829)
939(1)
FRANKENSTEIN IN CONTEXT: Romantic-Era Writers and Milton's Satan
940(1)
John Milton from Paradise Lost
941(7)
William Godwin from An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice
948(1)
George Gordon, Lord Byron Prometheus
948(2)
Caroline Lamb from Glenarvon
950(2)
John Keats To one who has been long in city pent
952(1)
from Marginalia to Paradise Lost
952(2)
William Hazlitt from Lectures on the English Poets
954(1)
Percy Bysshe Shelley from Preface to Prometheus Unbound
955(1)
from A Defence of Poetry
955(1)
Thomas De Quincey [What Do We Mean by Literature?]
956(2)
PERSPECTIVES: POPULAR PROSE AND THE PROBLEMS OF AUTHORSHIP
958(74)
SIR WALTER SCOTT
960(5)
Introduction to Tales of My Landlord
961(4)
CHARLES LAMB
965(10)
Oxford in the Vacation
966(4)
Dream Children
970(2)
Old China
972(3)
WILLIAM HAZLITT
975(17)
On Gusto
976(3)
My First Acquaintance with Poets
979(13)
THOMAS DE QUINCEY
992(28)
from Confessions of an English Opium-Eater
993(27)
JANE AUSTEN
1020(8)
from Pride and Prejudice
1021(1)
from Emma
1022(6)
Letter to James S. Clarke (11 December 1815)
1028(1)
WILLIAM COBBETT
1028(4)
from Rural Rides
1029(3)
The Victorian Age 1032(958)
THOMAS CARLYLE
1057(36)
Sartor Resartus
1059(23)
The Everlasting No
1059(4)
Centre of Indifference
1063(7)
The Everlasting Yea
1070(6)
Natural Supernaturalism
1076(6)
Past and Present
1082(11)
Midas [The Condition of England]
1082(3)
from Gospel of Mammonism [The Irish Widow]
1085(1)
from Labour [Know Thy Work]
1086(1)
from Democracy [Liberty to Die by Starvation]
1087(2)
Captains of Industry
1089(4)
PERSPECTIVES: THE INDUSTRIAL LANDSCAPE
1093(27)
THE STEAM LOOM WEAVER
1095(1)
FANNY KEMBLE
1096(2)
from Record of a Girlhood
1097(1)
THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY
1098(2)
from A Review of Southey's Colloquies
1098(2)
PARLIAMENTARY PAPERS ("BLUE BOOKS")
1100(2)
Testimony of Hannah Goode, a Child Textile Worker
1100(1)
Testimony of Ann and Elizabeth Eggley, Child Mineworkers
1101(1)
CHARLES DICKENS
1102(3)
from Dombey and Son
1102(1)
from Hard Times
1103(2)
BENJAMIN DISRAELI
1105(1)
from Sybil
1105(1)
FRIEDRICH ENGELS
1106(8)
from The Condition of the Working Class in England in 1844
1106(8)
HENRY MAYHEW
1114(6)
from London Labour and the London Poor
1114(6)
JOHN STUART MILL
1120(31)
On Liberty
1121(11)
from Chapter 2. Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion
1121(3)
from Chapter 3. Of Individuality, as One of the Elements of Well-Being
1124(8)
The Subjection of Women
1132(9)
from Chapter 1
1132(9)
Statement Repudiating the Rights of Husbands
1141(1)
Autobiography
1142(9)
from Chapter 1. Childhood, and Early Education
1142(2)
from Chapter 5. A Crisis in My Mental History. One Stage Onward
1144(7)
ELIZABETH BARRETT BROWNING
1151(33)
To George Sand: A Desire
1153(1)
To George Sand: A Recognition
1153(1)
A Year's Spinning
1154(1)
Sonnets from the Portuguese
1155(3)
1 ("I thought once how Theocritus had sung")
1155(1)
13 ("And wilt thou have me fashion into speech")
1155(1)
14 ("If thou must love me, let it be for nought")
1155(1)
21 ("Say over again, and yet once over again")
1156(1)
22 ("When our two souls stand up erect and strong")
1156(1)
24 ("Let the world's sharpness, like a clasping knife")
1156(1)
28 ("My letters! all dead paper, mute and white!")
1157(1)
32 ("The first time that the sun rose on thine oath")
1157(1)
38 ("First time he kissed me, he but only kissed")
1157(1)
43 ("How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.")
1158(1)
Aurora Leigh
1158(24)
Book 1
1158(1)
[Self-Portrait]
1158(2)
[Her Mother's Portrait]
1160(1)
[Aurora's Education]
1161(5)
[Discovery of Poetry]
1166(2)
Book 2
1168(1)
[Woman and Artist]
1168(3)
[No Female Christ]
1171(1)
[Aurora's Rejection of Romney]
1172(4)
Book 3
1176(1)
[The Woman Writer in London]
1176(3)
Book 5
1179(1)
[Epic Art and Modern Life]
1179(3)
from A Curse for a Nation
1182(1)
A Musical Instrument
1183(1)
The Best Thing in the World
1184(1)
ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON
1184(98)
The Kraken
1187(1)
Mariana
1187(2)
The Lady of Shalott
1189(5)
The Lotos-Eaters
1194(4)
Ulysses
1198(2)
Tithonus
1200(1)
Break, Break, Break
1201(1)
The Epic [Morte d'Arthur]
1202(2)
The Eagle: A Fragment
1204(1)
Locksley Hall
1204(6)
THE PRINCESS
1210(4)
Sweet and Low
1210(1)
The Splendour Falls
1210(1)
Tears, Idle Tears
1211(1)
Now Sleeps the Crimson Petal
1211(1)
Come Down, O Maid
1212(1)
["The Woman's Cause Is Man's"]
1213(1)
from In Memoriam A. H. H.
1214(29)
The Charge of the Light Brigade
1243(2)
Idylls of the King
1245(35)
The Coming of Arthur
1245(12)
Pelleas and Ettarre
1257(13)
The Passing of Arthur
1270(10)
The Higher Pantheism
1280(1)
Flower in the Crannied Wall
1281(1)
Crossing the Bar
1281(1)
CHARLES DARWIN
1282(31)
The Voyage of the Beagle
1283(10)
from Chapter 10. Tierra del Fuego
1283(6)
from Chapter 17. Galapagos Archipelago
1289(4)
On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection
1293(5)
from Chapter 3. Struggle for Existence
1293(5)
The Descent of Man
1298(6)
from Chapter 21. General Summary and Conclusion
1298(6)
from Autobiography
1304(9)
PERSPECTIVES: RELIGION AND SCIENCE
1313(32)
THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY
1314(1)
from Lord Bacon
1314(1)
CHARLES DICKENS
1315(3)
from Sunday Under Three Heads
1315(3)
DAVID FRIEDRICH STRAUSS
1318(3)
from The Life of Jesus Critically Examined
1318(3)
CHARLOTTE BRONTE
1321(2)
from Jane Eyre
1321(2)
ARTHUR HUGH CLOUGH
1323(2)
Epi-strauss-ium
1323(1)
The Latest Decalogue
1324(1)
from Dipsychus
1324(1)
JOHN WILLIAM COLENSO
1325(2)
from The Pentateuch and Book of Joshua Critically Examined
1326(1)
JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN
1327(7)
from Apologia Pro Vita Sua
1328(6)
THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY
1334(6)
from Evolution and Ethics
1335(5)
SIR EDMUND GOSSE
1340(5)
from Father and Son
1340(5)
ROBERT BROWNING
1345(49)
Porphyria's Lover
1348(1)
Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister
1349(2)
My Last Duchess
1351(1)
How They Brought the Good News from Ghent to Aix
1352(2)
Home-Thoughts, from Abroad
1354(1)
Home-Thoughts, from the Sea
1354(1)
The Bishop Orders His Tomb at Saint Praxed's Church
1355(3)
Meeting at Night
1358(1)
Parting at Morning
1358(1)
A Toccata of Galuppi's
1358(2)
Memorabilia
1360(1)
Love Among the Ruins
1360(2)
"Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came"
1362(5)
Fra Lippo Lippi
1367(8)
The Last Ride Together
1375(3)
Andrea Del Sarto
1378(6)
Two in the Campagna
1384(1)
A Woman's Last Word
1385(2)
Caliban Upon Setebos
1387(6)
Epilogue to Asolando
1393(1)
CHARLES DICKENS
1394(58)
A Christmas Carol
1396(48)
from A Walk in a Workhouse
1444(8)
COMPANION READINGS Dickens at Work: Recollections by His Children and Friends
1448(2)
Kate Field: Dickens Giving a Reading of A Christmas Carol
1450(2)
Popular Short Fiction 1452(538)
ELIZABETH GASKELL
1452(15)
Our Society at Cranford
1453(14)
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON
1467(9)
Thrawn Janet
1468(8)
THOMAS HARDY
1476(19)
The Withered Arm
1477(18)
SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE
1495(15)
A Scandal in Bohemia
1495(15)
EDITH NESBIT
1510(11)
Fortunatus Rex & Co.
1511(10)
GEORGE ELIOT
1521(32)
Brother Jacob
1522(26)
Margaret Fuller and Mary Wollstonecraft
1548(5)
JOHN RUSKIN
1553(30)
Modern Painters
1554(6)
from Definition of Greatness in Art
1554(1)
from Of Water, As Painted by Turner
1555(1)
from Of Modern Landscape
1556(4)
The Stones of Venice
1560(10)
from The Nature of Gothic
1560(10)
from Modern Manufacture and Design
1570(3)
Praeterita
1573(10)
Preface
1573(1)
from The Springs of Wandel
1574(2)
from Herne-Hill Almond Blossoms
1576(2)
from Schaffhausen and Milan
1578(2)
from The Grande Chartreuse
1580(2)
from Joanna's Care
1582(1)
FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE
1583(17)
Cassandra
1583(17)
PERSPECTIVES: VICTORIAN LADIES AND GENTLEMEN
1600(30)
FRANCIS POWER COBBE
1602(4)
from Life of Frances Power Cobbe As Told by Herself
1602(4)
SARAH STICKNEY ELLIS
1606(3)
from The Women of England: Their Social Duties and Domestic Habits
1606(3)
CHARLOTTE BRONTE
1609(2)
from Letter to Emily Bronte
1609(2)
ANNE BRONTE
1611(1)
from Agnes Grey
1611(1)
JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN
1612(1)
from The Idea of a University
1612(1)
CAROLINE NORTON
1613(3)
from A Letter to the Queen
1614(2)
THOMAS HUGHES
1616(2)
from Tom Brown's School Days
1616(2)
HARRIET MARTINEAU
1618(3)
from What Women Are Educated For
1618(3)
ISABELLA BEETON
1621(2)
from The Book of Household Management
1621(2)
QUEEN VICTORIA
1623(5)
Letters and Journal Entries on the Position of Women
1623(5)
CHARLES KINGSLEY
1628(1)
from Letters and Memories
1628(1)
SIR HENRY NEWBOLT
1629(1)
Vitai Lampada
1629(1)
MATTHEW ARNOLD
1630(63)
Isolation. To Marguerite
1632(1)
To Marguerite--Continued
1633(1)
Dover Beach
1634(1)
Lines Written in Kensington Gardens
1635(1)
The Buried Life
1636(2)
Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse
1638(5)
The Scholar-Gipsy
1643(6)
East London
1649(1)
West London
1649(1)
Thyrsis
1650(6)
The Function of Criticism at the Present Time
1656(17)
Culture and Anarchy
1673(14)
from Sweetness and Light
1673(2)
from Doing as One Likes
1675(6)
from Hebraism and Hellenism
1681(2)
from Porro Unum Est Necessarium
1683(3)
from Conclusion
1686(1)
from The Study of Poetry
1687(6)
DANTE GABRIEL ROSSETTI
1693(12)
The Blessed Damozel
1694(4)
The Woodspurge
1698(1)
The House of Life
1699(1)
The Sonnet
1699(1)
4. Lovesight
1699(1)
6. The Kiss
1699(1)
Nuptial Sleep
1700(1)
The Burden of Nineveh
1700(5)
CHRISTINA ROSSETTI
1705(22)
Song ("She sat and sang alway")
1706(1)
Song ("When I am dead, my dearest")
1706(1)
Remember
1707(1)
After Death
1707(1)
A Pause
1707(1)
Echo
1708(1)
Dead Before Death
1708(1)
Cobwebs
1709(1)
A Triad
1709(1)
In an Artist's Studio
1709(1)
A Birthday
1710(1)
An Apple-Gathering
1710(1)
Winter: My Secret
1711(1)
Up-Hill
1712(1)
Goblin Market
1712(12)
"No, Thank You, John"
1724(1)
Promises Like Pie-Crust
1725(1)
In Progress
1725(1)
What I Would Give?
1726(1)
A Life's Parallels
1726(1)
Later Life 17 ("Something this foggy day, a something which")
1726(1)
Sleeping at Last
1727(1)
WILLIAM MORRIS
1727(18)
The Defence of Guenevere
1728(7)
The Haystack in the Floods
1735(4)
from The Beauty of Life
1739(6)
ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE
1745(13)
The Leper
1746(4)
The Triumph of Time
1750(1)
I Will Go Back to the Great Sweet Mother
1750(1)
Itylus
1751(1)
Hymn to Proserpine
1752(3)
A Forsaken Garden
1755(2)
The Higher Pantheism in a Nutshell
1757(1)
WALTER PATER
1758(19)
The Renaissance
1759(6)
Preface
1759(3)
from Leonardo da Vinci
1762(1)
Conclusion
1763(2)
from The Child in the House
1765(6)
Appreciations
1771(6)
from Syle
1771(6)
GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS
1777(12)
God's Grandeur
1778(1)
The Starlight Night
1779(1)
Spring
1779(1)
The Windhover
1780(1)
Pied Beauty
1780(1)
Hurrahing in Harvest
1780(1)
Binsey Poplars
1781(1)
Duns Scotus's Oxford
1781(1)
Felix Randal
1782(1)
Spring and Fall: to a young child
1782(1)
As Kingfishers Catch Fire
1783(1)
[Carrion Comfort]
1783(1)
No Worst, There Is None
1784(1)
I Wake and Feel the Fell of Dark, Not Day
1784(1)
That Nature Is a Heraclitean Fire and of the Comfort of the Resurrection
1784(1)
Thou Art Indeed Just, Lord
1785(1)
from Journal [On "Inscape" and "Instress"]
1786(2)
from Letter to R. W. Dixon [On Sprung Rhythm]
1788(1)
RUDYARD KIPLING
1789(24)
Without Benefit of Clergy
1790(14)
JUST SO STORIES
1804(4)
How the Whale Got His Throat
1804(2)
How the Camel Got His Hump
1806(2)
Gunga Din
1808(2)
The Widow at Windsor
1810(1)
Recessional
1811(1)
If--
1812(1)
PERSPECTIVES: TRAVEL AND EMPIRE
1813(41)
FRANCES TROLLOPE
1814(6)
from Domestic Manners of the Americans
1814(6)
ALEXANDER WILLIAM KINGLAKE
1820(7)
from Eothen
1820(7)
SIR RICHARD FRANCIS BURTON
1827(5)
from A Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to El-Medinah and Meccah
1827(5)
ISABELLA BIRD
1832(7)
from A Lady's Life in the Rocky Mountains
1832(7)
SIR HENRY MORTON STANLEY
1839(7)
from Through the Dark Continent
1839(7)
MARY KINGSLEY
1846(8)
from Travels in West Africa
1846(8)
OSCAR WILDE
1854(82)
Impression du Matin
1856(1)
The Harlot's House
1857(1)
Symphony in Yellow
1858(1)
from The Decay of Lying
1858(15)
from The Soul of Man Under Socialism
1873(8)
Preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray
1881(1)
The Importance of Being Earnest
1882(40)
Aphorisms
1922(2)
from De Profundis
1924(12)
COMPANION READING H. Montgomery Hyde: from The Trials of Oscar Wilde
1931(5)
PERSPECTIVES: AESTHETICISM, DECADENCE, AND THE FIN DE SIECLE
1936(54)
W. S. GILBERT
1938(2)
If You're Anxious for to Shine in the High Aesthetic Line
1938(2)
JAMES ABBOTT MCNEILL WHISTLER
1940(5)
from Mr. Whistler's "Ten O'Clock"
1941(4)
"MICHAEL FIELD" (KATHARINE BRADLEY AND EDITH COOPER)
1945(2)
La Gioconda
1946(1)
A Pen-Drawing of Leda
1946(1)
"A Girl"
1946(1)
ADA LEVERSON
1947(5)
Suggestion
1947(5)
ARTHUR SYMONS
1952(4)
Pastel
1953(1)
White Heliotrope
1953(1)
from The Decadent Movement in Literature
1954(1)
from Preface to Silhouettes
1955(1)
RICHARD LE GALLIENNE
1956(1)
A Ballad of London
1956(1)
LIONEL JOHNSON
1957(3)
The Destroyer of a Soul
1958(1)
The Dark Angel
1958(2)
A Decadent's Lyric
1960(1)
LORD ALFRED DOUGLAS
1960(3)
In Praise of Shame
1961(1)
Two Loves
1961(2)
Impression de Nuit
1963(1)
OLIVE CUSTANCE (LADY ALFRED DOUGLAS)
1963(3)
The Masquerade
1964(1)
Statues
1965(1)
The White Witch
1965(1)
AUBREY BEARDSLEY
1966(3)
The Ballad of a Barber
1966(3)
MAX BEERBOHM
1969(21)
Enoch Soames
1969(21)
The Twentieth Century 1990(909)
JOSEPH CONRAD
2013(67)
Preface to The Nigger of the "Narcissus"
2016(2)
Heart of Darkness
2018(62)
COMPANION READINGS Joseph Conrad: from Congo Diary
2072(2)
Sir Henry Morton Stanley: from Address to the Manchester Chamber of Commerce
2074(5)
Gang of Four: We Live As We Dream, Alone
2079(1)
THOMAS HARDY
2080(12)
Hap
2081(1)
Neutral Tones
2082(1)
Wessex Heights
2082(1)
The Darkling Thrush
2083(1)
On the Departure Platform
2084(1)
The Convergence of the Twain
2084(1)
At Castle Boterel
2085(1)
Channel Firing
2086(1)
In Time of "The Breaking of Nations"
2087(1)
I Looked Up from My Writing
2087(1)
"And There Was a Great Calm"
2088(1)
Logs on the Hearth
2089(1)
The Photograph
2090(1)
The Fallow Deer at the Lonely House
2090(1)
Afterwards
2091(1)
Epitaph
2091(1)
BERNARD SHAW
2092(99)
Preface to Major Barbara
2095(24)
Major Barbara
2119(63)
COMPANION READING Emmeline Pankhurst: Address
2178(4)
Shakes Versus Shav
2182(4)
LETTERS
2186(5)
To Francis Collison (20 August 1903)
2186(1)
To Eleanor Robson (13 April 1905)
2187(1)
To Louis Calvert (23 July 1905)
2188(1)
To Louis Calvert (29 November 1905)
2188(1)
To William Stead (13 December 1905)
2189(1)
To The Times (31 October 1906)
2189(2)
PERSPECTIVES: THE GREAT WAR: CONFRONTING THE MODERN
2191(104)
BLAST
2191(35)
Vorticist Manifesto
2193(14)
Rebecca West: Indissoluble Matrimony
2207(17)
Ezra Pound: The New Cake of Soap
2224(1)
Ezra Pound: Salutation the Third
2225(1)
RUPERT BROOKE
2226(1)
The Soldier
2226(1)
T. E. LAWRENCE
2226(13)
from The Seven Pillars of Wisdom
2227(12)
SIEGFRIED SASSOON
2239(2)
Glory of Women
2240(1)
Everyone Sang
2240(1)
WILFRED OWEN
2241(2)
Anthem for Doomed Youth
2241(1)
Strange Meeting
2242(1)
Dulce Et Decorum Est
2242(1)
ISAAC ROSENBERG
2243(1)
Break of Day in the Trenches
2244(1)
DAVID JONES
2244(21)
from In Parenthesis
2245(20)
KATHERINE MANSFIELD
2265(14)
The Daughters of the Late Colonel
2266(13)
ROBERT GRAVES
2279(16)
from Goodbye to All That
2280(15)
SPEECHES ON IRISH INDEPENDENCE
2295(10)
Charles Stewart Parnell
2296(3)
At Limerick
2296(1)
Before the House of Commons
2296(2)
At Portsmouth, After the Defeat of Mr. Gladstone's Home Rule Bill
2298(1)
Speech Delivered in Committee Room No. 15
2299(1)
Proclamation of the Irish Republic
2299(1)
Padraic Pearse
2300(1)
Kilmainham Prison
2300(1)
Michael Collins
2301(4)
The Substance of Freedom
2301(4)
WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS
2305(27)
The Lake Isle of Innisfree
2308(1)
Who Goes with Fergus?
2309(1)
No Second Troy
2309(1)
The Fascination of What's Difficult
2309(1)
The Wild Swans at Coole
2310(1)
Easter 1916
2310(2)
The Second Coming
2312(1)
A Prayer for My Daughter
2313(2)
Sailing to Byzantium
2315(1)
Meditations in Time of Civil War
2315(5)
Nineteen Hundred and Nineteen
2320(3)
Leda and the Swan
2323(1)
Among School Children
2324(1)
Byzantium
2325(1)
Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop
2326(1)
Lapis Lazuli
2327(1)
The Circus Animals' Desertion
2328(1)
Under Ben Bulben
2329(3)
JAMES JOYCE
2332(85)
DUBLINERS
2335(44)
Eveline
2335(3)
Clay
2338(4)
Ivy Day in the Committee Room
2342(10)
The Dead
2352(27)
Ulysses
2379(26)
[Chapter 7. Aeolus]
2380(25)
Finnegans Wake and a First-Draft Version of Finnegans Wake
2405(12)
[The Fall]
2406(3)
[Shem the Penman]
2409(5)
[Anna Livia Plurabelle]
2414(3)
T. S. ELIOT
2417(36)
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
2420(7)
COMPANION READINGS Arthur Waugh: [Cleverness and the New Poetry]
2423(2)
Ezra Pound: Drunken Helots and Mr. Eliot
2425(2)
Gerontion
2427(2)
The Waste Land
2429(13)
Journey of the Magi
2442(1)
Four Quartets
2443(4)
Burnt Norton
2443(4)
Tradition and the Individual Talent
2447(6)
VIRGINIA WOOLF
2453(74)
Mrs Dalloway in Bond Street
2455(6)
The Lady in the Looking-Glass: A Reflection
2461(3)
from A Room of One's Own
2464(35)
from Three Guineas
2499(15)
from The Diaries
2514(13)
PERSPECTIVES: BLOOMSBURY AND MODERNISM
2527(36)
LYTTON STRACHEY
2528(15)
from Eminent Victorians
2529(14)
E. M. FORSTER
2543(9)
ADRIFT IN INDIA The Nine Gems of Ujjain
2544(2)
Advance, India!
2546(2)
Jodhpur
2548(2)
The Suppliant
2550(2)
ROGER FRY
2552(7)
Culture and Snobbism
2552(7)
VIRGINIA WOOLF
2559(4)
Letter to Vanessa Bell
2559(1)
Letter to Gerald Brenan
2560(2)
Letter to Vita Sackville-West
2562(1)
D. H. LAWRENCE
2563(63)
Piano
2565(1)
Song of a Man Who Has Come Through
2565(1)
Tortoise Shout
2566(2)
Snake
2568(2)
Bavarian Gentians
2570(1)
The Fox
2571(43)
Surgery for the Novel-or a Bomb
2614(3)
from Etruscan Places
2617(9)
EVELYN WAUGH
2626(7)
Cruise
2626(7)
COMPANION READING Monty Python: Travel Agent
2630(3)
GRAHAM GREENE
2633(10)
A Chance for Mr Lever
2633(10)
P. G. WODEHOUSE
2643(13)
Strychnine in the Soup
2644(12)
W. H. AUDEN
2656(22)
Musee des Beaux Arts
2658(1)
In Memory of W. B. Yeats
2658(2)
Spain 1937
2660(2)
Lullaby
2662(1)
September 1, 1939
2663(3)
In Praise of Limestone
2666(2)
Writing
2668(10)
PERSPECTIVES: WORLD WAR II AND THE END OF EMPIRE
2678(58)
SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL
2679(8)
Two Speeches Before the House of Commons
2680(7)
STEPHEN SPENDER
2687(3)
Icarus
2688(1)
What I Expected
2688(1)
The Express
2689(1)
The Pylons
2689(1)
ELIZABETH BOWEN
2690(10)
Mysterious Kor
2690(10)
GEORGE ORWELL
2700(17)
from Inside the Whale
2701(7)
Politics and the English Language
2708(9)
SALMAN RUSHDIE
2717(19)
Outside the Whale
2717(9)
Chekov and Zulu
2726(10)
DYLAN THOMAS
2736(9)
The Force That Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower
2737(1)
Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night
2738(1)
Return Journey
2738(7)
SAMUEL BECKETT
2745(18)
Krapp's Last Tape
2747(5)
Texts for Nothing
2752(4)
4 ("Where would I go, if I could go, who would I be, if I could be")
2752(2)
8 ("Only the words break the silence, all other sounds have ceased")
2754(2)
The Expelled
2756(7)
V. S. NAIPAUL
2763(14)
In a Free State
2764(13)
Prologue, from a Journal: The Tramp at Piraeus
2764(8)
Epilogue, from a Journal: The Circus at Luxor
2772(5)
HANIF KUREISHI
2777(46)
My Beautiful Laundrette
2778(45)
MARGARET DRABBLE
2823(8)
The Gifts of War
2823(8)
PHILIP LARKIN
2831(11)
Church Going
2832(2)
High Windows
2834(1)
Talking in Bed
2834(1)
MCMXIV
2835(1)
from Preface to All What Jazz
2835(7)
PERSPECTIVES: WHOSE LANGUAGE?
2842(57)
SEAMUS HEANEY
2843(14)
Feeling into Words
2844(13)
MEDBH MCGUCKIAN
2857(2)
Mr. McGregor's Garden
2857(1)
The Dream-Language of Fergus
2858(1)
Coleridge
2859(1)
NUALA NI DHOMHNAILL
2859(13)
Feeding a Child
2860(1)
Parthenogenesis
2861(1)
Labasheedy (The Silken Bed)
2862(1)
As for the Quince
2863(1)
Why I Choose to Write in Irish, The Corpse That Sits Up and Talks Back
2864(8)
NADINE GORDIMER
2872(7)
What Were You Dreaming?
2873(6)
JAMES KELMAN
2879(9)
Home for a Couple of Days
2880(8)
DEREK WALCOTT
2888(11)
A Far Cry from Africa
2889(1)
Wales
2890(1)
The Fortunate Traveller
2890(5)
Midsummer
2895(1)
50 ("I once gave my daughters, separately, two conch shells")
2895(1)
52 ("I heard them marching the leaf-wet roads of my head")
2896(1)
54 ("The midsummer sea, the hot pitch road, this grass, these shacks that made me")
2896(3)
Political and Religious Orders 2899(6)
Money, Weights, and Measures 2905(2)
Literary and Cultural Terms 2907(24)
Bibliographies 2931(38)
Credits 2969(4)
Index 2973

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