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Look-Alikes
     

Look-Alikes

3.8 9
by Joan Steiner
 
Welcome to the land of look-alikes, where the more you look, the more you see! Artist Joan Steiner has used everything from acorns and broccoli to yardsticks and zippers to create this striking three-dimensional world. Stop in at the Sweet Shop and sit down on a chair built out of pretzels and crackers, or stroll through the park, where pennies are cobblestones and a

Overview

Welcome to the land of look-alikes, where the more you look, the more you see! Artist Joan Steiner has used everything from acorns and broccoli to yardsticks and zippers to create this striking three-dimensional world. Stop in at the Sweet Shop and sit down on a chair built out of pretzels and crackers, or stroll through the park, where pennies are cobblestones and a shoehorn becomes a slide. With more than one thousand look-alikes to find, this book will have puzzlers of all ages poring over its pages or hours on end.

Editorial Reviews

Molly Rauch
E.. . .Steiner's astounding thoroughness. . .has created a coherent, winking universe — The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this dazzling debut, first-time picture book author/artist Steiner employs clever visual puns to create a whimsical parallel world. Using found objects, she painstakingly assembles three-dimensional collages that re-create everyday scenes, then photographs the results. What ensues is a tour de force of trompe l'oeil. Pistachio nuts on stems form a bouquet of "tulips" in a hotel lobby scene, where a tiny guest sits cozily on a "couch" made from a pair of cupped gloves. A city skyline reveals a modern skyscraper composed of a stack of CDs; two doors down a cowbell perched atop a vintage cookbook mimics the architecture of an earlier era. Dog biscuits laid end-to-end form the brick-like facade of yet another building, while at a park, a shoehorn "slide" and a sandbox made from an inverted tambourine abut a "water fountain" that's really a shell perched atop a chess piece. In this world where nothing is quite what it seems, slices of bread pave a sidewalk; infant pacifiers double as gaslights; pretzels affixed to round crackers become chairs at an old-fashioned soda fountain. Readers will pore over the enchanting visual similes, nearly 100 in each scene, in their attempts to detect each one. There's even a key at the end that offers a complete list of the look-alikes, to ensure none are overlooked. The amount of work that went into each tableau is staggering; the end result sheer delight. Bursting with creativity, this work of visual genius will set imaginations soaring.
Children's Literature - Carolyn Dennette Michaels
"Welcome to the land of look-alikes, the more you look, the more you'll see." Steiner has created 3-dimensional scenes using a variety of objects. This photographic picture book for puzzle minded adults and children includes a section for each double page photograph -Train, Train Station, Look-Alike City, etc. that matches the contrived objects with their physical ingredients. Taken together-illusion and reality-combine to provide both a pleasurable landscape to explore and the factual back-up needed to decipher illusions and encourage personal creativity. It will provide hours of entertainment.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Bold, full-color photographs of three-dimensional collages made of found objects create a puzzle book that is sure to please. A multitude of everyday items are cleverly arranged to create realistic miniature scenes of a train station, city street, general store, park and zoo, amusement park, hotel, neighborhood, sweet shop, circus, and harbor. While the title is similar in format and execution to that of Jean Marzollo's "I Spy" books (Scholastic), Steiner creates her own unusual look-alike worlds using everything from broccoli to razors to dominoes. Mousetraps are towers, crackers form the fa ade of a building, pretzels are seat backs, and a coffeepot is a train engine. Four-line verses challenge readers to find particular articles on each of the 11 double-page spreads. All of the objects are listed in the back and hard-to-find items ("for super-sleuths only") are highlighted with asterisks. Guaranteed fun.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA
Peter D. Sieruta
In a series of sharply photographed color tableaux, a train headed for Look-Alike Land puffs pink smoke against a star-studded sky, followed by an interior view of an ornate train station. But wait. On closer inspec-tion, the locomotive is made from a coffee pot; the smokestack is a spool of thread; and the smoke is made of cotton balls. The stars are actually an earring, a button, and a baby tooth. Inside the station, a domed ceiling is formed by an upside-down vegetable steamer, and a nipple from a baby bottle is perched atop the information booth; chess pawns form the pillars. This strikingly original puzzle book introduces Look-Alike Land in eleven double-page spreads that feature three-dimensional representations of the town's general store, hotel, and amusement park, among other settings. Each scene is composed of over one hundred everyday objects cunningly crafted to depict their life-size counterparts: a vacuum cleaner is a disposable razor; seat cushions are fig bars; and lamps are made from peppermint candies, chess pieces, and plastic pencil sharpeners. Readers will marvel at the ingenuity that could conceive, then create, this miniature world, and will soon be caught up in the game of trying to identify the household items hidden in each composition; the solutions are neatly cataloged at the end of the book. The only disappointing component is the banal rhymed text, which includes couplets such as "In Look-Alike Land! That magical spot / Where everyday things look like what they're not." When visiting Look-Alike Land, it's best to ignore the clunky rhymes and just enjoy the amazing scenery.-- Horn Book
Molly E. Rauch
. . .Steiner's astounding thoroughness. . .has created a coherent, winking universe -- The New York Times Book Review
Kirkus Reviews
Steiner transports readers to a fantastic city constructed out of everyday household items in this colorful and engaging picture book. A spirited text guides onlookers through this miniature metropolis, a tour comprised of full-color spreads that are loaded with surprises: skyscrapers made out of sweaters and dog bones, Ritz cracker and pretzel chairs, and a Brooklyn Bridge spanned by nutcrackers. A guide in the back details the number of look-alike items (up to 207 in each photographed scene), making this a fun addition to any shelf, and especially where the I Spy books are in demand.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316812559
Publisher:
Little, Brown and Company
Publication date:
09/01/1998
Edition description:
BK&CD-ROM
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.44(w) x 12.39(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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Look-alikes Seek-and-search Puzzles 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is so fantastic that everyone in my family has received both of Joan Steiner's books for Christmas. I have friends who had to have their own copies after they saw mine. Everyone that visits me, from small nieces to my elderly mother-in-law, have LOVED every page. THANKS, Joan Steiner. When is the next one coming out? P.S. The person who wrote the long-winded review at the very top expressing dismay that cigarette lighters were pictured should perhaps realize that it's a GOOD thing her child CAN identify these items....otherwise, how would she know NOT to play with a lighter?? Wise up, lady!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am not sure if this book is age appropriate. This book has pictures of cigarettes,cigars, lighters and matches(enlarge the book and you will see the lighters in the boat). Some of these items you can not purchase until you are 18, so I wonder why they are in a childrens book. We teach our children that cigarettes are bad for them and that lighters and matches are not toys. I am not a proud parent because my child can identify these items. Children use there imaginations in many ways, what if they want to reconstruct what the author has built are we to give them these items to play with? Some people think this is art, sorry not for my children. I do not think this book is sending a very positive message to young children. This book is in some school libraries. What if a young child brought these items to school? What would happen? But its okay for them to be in a childrens book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the best books i have ever seen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At a birthday party for a child I and another adult had a lovely time going over the Look-Alikes, Jr.(a gift). I enjoy minitures for doll houses so this was a real treat. This would be fun for an adult who might be recuperating from illness and not able to do much.