Look for Me All Around You: Anglophone Caribbean Immigrants in the Harlem Renaissance

Overview

Interdisciplinary in scope, this anthology redresses the undue neglect of Anglophone Caribbeans—almost 25 percent of the Black population in Harlem in 1920—and their pivotal role in the literary, cultural, and political events shaping the Harlem Renaissance. The poetry, fiction, drama, and essays included explore a variety of issues, such as the increasing emphasis on race and image building, the development of a Black aesthetic, progressive politics, and the struggle to define the status of Blacks in America. ...

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Interdisciplinary in scope, this anthology redresses the undue neglect of Anglophone Caribbeans—almost 25 percent of the Black population in Harlem in 1920—and their pivotal role ... in the literary, cultural, and political events shaping the Harlem Renaissance. The poetry, fiction, drama, and essays included explore a variety of issues, such as the increasing emphasis on race and image building, the development of a Black aesthetic, progressive politics, and the struggle to define the status of Blacks in America. Both the literary and political works show the spirit of the New Negro, one emphasizing racial pride and aesthetic consciousness. Examined closely are those Black and Carribean American figures involved in the Black nationalism movement, socialist groups, and trade unions, including such prominent figures as Marcus Garvey and his two wives, Amy Ashwood and Amy Jacques Garvey, Hubert Harrison, W. A. Domingo, and Frank Crosswaith. Also explored are the developing communist movements as manifested in the writings of Cyril Briggs, Richard B. Moore, Otto Huiswoud, and George Padmore. Essays review the crucial literary contributions of Claude McKay, Eric Walrond, and dramatist Eulalie Spence, as well as historians Arthur Schomburg and J. A. Rogers. This anthology of writers, with accompanying discussions about their works placed in the context of their own time, will be of interest to anyone examining the Harlem Renaissance and the larger Black and Caribbean contribution to cultural and political thinking. Read more Show Less

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Overview

Interdisciplinary in scope, this anthology redresses the undue neglect of Anglophone Caribbeans—almost 25 percent of the Black population in Harlem in 1920—and their pivotal role in the literary, cultural, and political events shaping the Harlem Renaissance. The poetry, fiction, drama, and essays included explore a variety of issues, such as the increasing emphasis on race and image building, the development of a Black aesthetic, progressive politics, and the struggle to define the status of Blacks in America. Both the literary and political works show the spirit of the New Negro, one emphasizing racial pride and aesthetic consciousness.

Examined closely are those Black and Carribean American figures involved in the Black nationalism movement, socialist groups, and trade unions, including such prominent figures as Marcus Garvey and his two wives, Amy Ashwood and Amy Jacques Garvey, Hubert Harrison, W. A. Domingo, and Frank Crosswaith. Also explored are the developing communist movements as manifested in the writings of Cyril Briggs, Richard B. Moore, Otto Huiswoud, and George Padmore. Essays review the crucial literary contributions of Claude McKay, Eric Walrond, and dramatist Eulalie Spence, as well as historians Arthur Schomburg and J. A. Rogers. This anthology of writers, with accompanying discussions about their works placed in the context of their own time, will be of interest to anyone examining the Harlem Renaissance and the larger Black and Caribbean contribution to cultural and political thinking.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814329870
  • Publisher: Wayne State University Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2005
  • Series: African American Life Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 488
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Louis J. Parascandola is associate professor of English at Long Island University and author of Winds Can Wake up the Dead: An Eric Walrond Reader (Wayne State University Press, 1998).
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Table of Contents

Africa for the Africans 55
The future as I see it 59
The Negro, communism, trade unionism and his (?) friend 64
The Negro's greatest enemy 67
Declaration of rights of the Negro peoples of the world 78
First message to the Negroes of the world from Atlanta prison 87
African fundamentalism 90
The black woman 93
"Home to Harlem," Claude McKay's damaging book, should earn wholesale condemnation of Negroes 94
The birth of the Universal Negro Improvement Association 100
Whither goest thou? 111
On a trip from coast to coast 113
The hand that rocks the cradle 116
Our women getting into the larger life 118
Women and world peace 120
The tidal wave of oppressed peoples beats against the color line 121
Imprison a leader and you boost his cause 123
Women as leaders nationally and racially 124
I am a Negro - and beautiful 127
Socialism and the Negro 135
Launching the Liberty League 141
The new politics for the new Negro 143
The descent of Du Bois 144
Just crabs 146
Two Negro radicalisms 148
The white war and the colored world 151
Hands across the sea 153
Race consciousness 154
Prejudice growing less and co-operation more, says student of question 155
"No Negro literary renaissance," says well known writer 159
Socialism the Negroes' hope 166
"If we must die" 169
A new Negro and a new day 170
[Everywhere Bolshevism brings terror to the heart of imperialism] 173
Socialism imperilled, or the Negro - a potential menace to American radicalism 174
Gift of the black tropics 175
Black man's burden : Harlem doubly enslaved by color and capitalism 187
Toward the home stretch 193
Race catechism 202
Dr. Du Bois misrepresents Negrodom 203
The old Negro goes : let him go in peace 205
Bolshevism's menace : to whom and to what? 206
The salvation of the Negro 208
The Tulsa riot and the African Blood Brotherhood 210
Programme of the African Blood Brotherhood 211
The decline of the Garvey Movement 219
"For self-determination in the black belt" 224
The Colonial Congress and the Negro 230
An open letter to Mr. A. Philip Randolph, general organizer of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters 234
Housing and the Negro masses 238
Free the Scottsboro boys! 240
The Negro problem is important 245
World aspects of the Negro question 246
Gastonia : its significance to Negro labor 259
Revolutionary perspectives 265
The Harlem dancer 279
The tired worker 280
My mother 280
Flame-heart 281
The tropics in New York 282
If we must die 283
America 283
Baptism 284
Exhortation : summer, 1919 284
The White House 285
A Negro poet 286
Garvey as a Negro Moses 288
Soviet Russia and the Negro (part 2) 292
A Negro to his critics 299
Arrival (from home to Harlem) 306
Mattie and her sweetman 308
Crazy Mary 317
Marcus Garvey - a defense 329
The new Negro faces America 330
The black city 334
On being black 336
The stone rebounds 340
Vignettes of the dusk 343
The wharf rats 346
The palm porch 358
City love 367
The starter 379
Her 386
Hot stuff 397
A criticism of the Negro drama as it relates to the Negro dramatist and artist 406
The Negro digs up his past 414
From superman to man 424
Jazz at home 427
Is black ever white? 434
Who is the new Negro, and why? 436
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