Look! Look! Look!

Overview

Look, look, look what three tiny mice have found. A postcard with a painting entitled "Portrait of Lady Clopton" by Robert Peake on the front. They look, look, look at the painting and see that it has patterns, colors, lines, and shapes. As they keep looking and seeing, they experiment with paper, scissors, and markers, experiencing the excitement that comes with creative thinking and doing. Children will be inspired by this introduction to art and observation, illustrated with Nancy Elizabeth Wallace’s signature...

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Overview

Look, look, look what three tiny mice have found. A postcard with a painting entitled "Portrait of Lady Clopton" by Robert Peake on the front. They look, look, look at the painting and see that it has patterns, colors, lines, and shapes. As they keep looking and seeing, they experiment with paper, scissors, and markers, experiencing the excitement that comes with creative thinking and doing. Children will be inspired by this introduction to art and observation, illustrated with Nancy Elizabeth Wallace’s signature paper-cut artwork. A glossary and postcard activity reinforces lessons learned throughout the book.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
One day the mouse family who lives behind the walls of the house intercepts a postcard dropped through the mail slot of the Bigley family. The card shows the Portrait of Lady Clopton painted in the 17th century and the little mice eagerly examine and observe all facets of the painting. With cutout shapes they focus on her face, her hands, and the details of her dress, and identify all the shapes and patterns and colors. Setting the postcard on an easel, they draw their own interpretation as well as use colorful shapes to make creations of their own, including making a Lady Mouseston. The sound of a key in the lock sends the mice scurrying to return the postcard to the family. "Now it was the Bigley's turn to Look! Look! Look!" What a fun way to introduce preschoolers and primary grade children to art appreciation. The crisp white pages with their collages of varying textures of cut paper bring a tactile dimension to the book. The glossary colorfully explains and reinforces terms like line, shape, and pattern. Every elementary school art teacher will want to own a copy of this, and parents will find it a fine introduction to art before taking wee ones off to the art gallery to observe and appreciate.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-This adorable and informative look at a mouse family that "borrows" a postcard depicting a famous painting is a winning choice. The mice carefully study the portrait, examining each part and analyzing what they see-patterns, colors, lines, shapes, etc. They not only enjoy and appreciate what they learn, but they also individually and collectively decide that they can compose their very own pictures as they now know so much about these artistic elements. This delightful lesson comes to a rather abrupt finale when the humans return home. Wallace and Friedlaender have assembled a charming foray into the world of art, complete with a helpful glossary and lessons on how to make a self-portrait. This is not only an amusing, creative story, but also an adventure into art that encourages originality while inspiring creativity. Great for libraries and elementary art instructors.-Andrea Tarr, Corona Public Library, CA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Three clever mice (budding artists all) deconstruct a famous painting, and use what they learn to explore their own ideas about art. The Bigley family's three resident mice-Alexander, Kiki and Kat-hear the "CLACK" of the mail slot and, knowing the Bigleys are away, rush to intercept the delivery, which happens to be a picture postcard from a friend named Art. "Looking at paintings is wonderful!" his message declares. On the opposite side is the Portrait of Lady Clopton; she's an elaborately dressed Elizabethan lady. Following the advice of the book's title, the mouse trio explores the oil painting through tiny picture frames that they cut from pieces of paper. They discover that they can see the painting in different ways, through its colors, shapes and lines. Armed with this knowledge, they create their own art. There's a handy glossary and a step-by-step art project: "Making a Self-Portrait Picture Postcard." An accessible book, packed with learning opportunities. (Picture book. 5-8)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761452829
  • Publisher: Amazon Childrens Publishing
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 673,339
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.10 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.50 (d)

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