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Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl (Dear America Series)
     

Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl (Dear America Series)

by Patricia C. McKissack
 

In acclaimed author Patricia McKissack's latest addition to the Dear America line, Lozette, a French slave, whose masters uproot her and bring her to America, must find her place in the New World.

Arriving with her French masters in upstate New York at the tail end of the French-Indian War, Lozette, "Zettie," an orphaned slave girl, is confronted with new

Overview


In acclaimed author Patricia McKissack's latest addition to the Dear America line, Lozette, a French slave, whose masters uproot her and bring her to America, must find her place in the New World.

Arriving with her French masters in upstate New York at the tail end of the French-Indian War, Lozette, "Zettie," an orphaned slave girl, is confronted with new landscapes, new conditions, and new conflicts. As her masters are torn between their own nationality and their somewhat reluctant new allegiance to the British colonial government, Zettie, too, must reconsider her own loyalties.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Following the "Dear America" series format, this is not an actual diary. The book weaves historical events and people of 1763 with fictional ones. So, battles in the French and Indian War and the fencing champion Saint Georges mix with fictional Lozette, an African-French slave girl, and semi-fictional Marie Louise, based on a real female fencing champ. Notes and photos in the book help explain where reality ends and fiction begins. Lozette, or Zettie, begins her diary January, 1763, in Aix-en-Provence, while locked up in a tiny room of the Boyer home. Pierre, the brother of Marie for whom Zettie has been a companion for seven years, is about to sell Zettie away from all she believes to be hers. That's when the real adventure begins. Twelve-year-old Zettie and eighteen-year-old Marie escape to the New World to find Marie's older brother Jacques, who disappeared while fighting for the French. In a year's time, Zettie learns how to do meaningful tasks such as cooking, as well as put her knowledge of arithmetic, reading, and writing to good use in her new home in Fort Niagara. Zettie (ultimately freed from slavery), Marie, and many diverse colonists learn how to be free in this new environment. A map of Zettie's route taken in the New World would be helpful. The switch from the diary's "translated" French to English, Zettie's lesser-known language, is unconvincing since the style doesn't change. But the reader forgets this and is caught up in the story. 2004, Scholastic Inc, Ages 12 up.
—Carol Raker Collins, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Zettie, 12, is a companion to the daughter of a once-wealthy Frenchman. An African slave, she was purchased as a gift for Marie-Louise and although well treated, she longs to be free. After Marie-Louise's father dies, her older brother threatens to sell the slaves and marry off his sister to an older, unattractive, but wealthy man to keep himself out of debtor's prison. Marie-Louise convinces her fianc to purchase Zettie as her wedding gift, and the two girls, with the help of a friend, flee to Spain, and then to America. They sail to a British-controlled fort in the area that would later become New York State. The rest of the book describes life at the fort, the effects of the French and Indian War on the relations with the Native Americans, and Marie-Louise's search for her younger brother, who had been captured by the Delaware Indians. The diary is a straightforward account with very little emotion. Zettie simply records the events of the day with few comments as to her thoughts and feelings, and her character is never fully developed. The other figures are even more shadowy. The quality of the black-and-white period maps, portraits, landscapes, etc., is poor. It is unfortunate that a book written about this time period, on which there is little fiction available for this age, is not up to the author's usual standard.-Nancy P. Reeder, Heathwood Hall Episcopal School, Columbia, SC Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439210386
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2004
Series:
Dear America Series
Pages:
188
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 7.38(h) x 0.71(d)
Lexile:
670L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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