Looking at Glass Through the Ages

Looking at Glass Through the Ages

by Bruce Koscielniak
     
 


Look around you! Glass is everywhere: the mirror where you brush your teeth in the morning, the test tube in your science class, and your cup of juice on the dinner table. But what do you really know about it? Where did it come from?

To find out, you have to travel all the way back to ancient Egypt, where glass was first in use. Beautiful illustrations give

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Overview


Look around you! Glass is everywhere: the mirror where you brush your teeth in the morning, the test tube in your science class, and your cup of juice on the dinner table. But what do you really know about it? Where did it come from?

To find out, you have to travel all the way back to ancient Egypt, where glass was first in use. Beautiful illustrations give a sense of the time and place as you span the globe and thousands of years to see glass’s use expand from small pots, to bottles, to cathedral stained-glass windows to telescope lenses and more! Lots of diagrams detail the step-by-step processes of glassmaking through the ages.

Another vivid and informative book from a master of explanation, Bruce Koscielniak.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A handsome book on the history of glassmaking...Much information is compacted into the smoothly written narrative." School Library Journal
Children's Literature - Sharon Salluzzo
What is glass and how did it become such a common material used in such a wide range of objects? That is what the author succinctly and successfully answers in this picture book format. Beginning with the creation of glass in ancient Egypt, he not only provides a history but also the processes used. Captions are used to identify the tools and the process under discussion. Koscielniak shows the readers how one discovery led to another. He takes a look at Egyptian faience, early molded glass and glass blowing, stained glass for cathedrals, lead crystal, and fiber optics. The importance of clear glass, used for magnifying glasses, spectacles, and mirrors, is also mentioned. The endpapers depict a watercolor map of Europe surrounded by glass objects along with their descriptions and places of origin. Koscielniak is careful to keep his explanations brief so as not to overwhelm the reader. This is a good book for browsing or to locate introductory material.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-A handsome book on the history of glassmaking. Starting with faience, developed in Egypt around 2500 B.C., the author's precisely worded, carefully detailed text and watercolor artwork explain the steps for producing various types of glass and glassware. Coverage is chronological from the origins of glassblowing in Syria in 30 B.C. to production of Roman luxury glass, magnifying lenses, engraved Venetian glass, stained-glass windows, glass mirrors, lead crystal, crown glass, plate glass, molded glass, glass-tube neon lighting, and optical fiber. Much information is compacted into the smoothly written narrative. Captioned illustrations are well matched with the text and extend the information value of the book. The map on the endpapers identifies regions of early glass production. This title is suitable for browsers and those beginning research and would work well when combined with Claire Llewellyn's Glass (Watts, 2002), which focuses more on the science of glass, modern methods of production, and recycling.-Lynn K. Vanca, Akron-Summit County Public Library, Richfield, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Koscielniak opens with the appearance of faience beads in Egypt about 4,500 years ago, closes with the development of optical fiber and, in between, charts milestones in the use and manufacture of glass, from the various chemical additions that have given it strength and color-and clarity, which turns out to be a late and tricky accomplishment-to the invention of glassblowing. Though his ink-and-watercolor illustrations are less engagingly detailed than in earlier outings, they do depict historical techniques of manufacture while artfully capturing glass's gemlike, rainbow glitter in tiny beads and telescope mirrors, a neon sign, a great cathedral window and other objects. Young readers will come away with enough facts for a simple report, as well as a greater appreciation for what the author twice dubs an "extraordinary material." (endpaper maps) (Picture book/nonfiction. 7-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618507504
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/17/2006
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


Bruce Koscielniak is the author and illustrator of several books for children; he is also a musician who has played the violin and jazz guitar for many years. He lives in the Berkshires region of Massachusetts.

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