BN.com Gift Guide

Looking Back: A Book of Memories

( 1 )

Overview

"I would like to introduce you to this book. It has no plot. It is about moments, memories, fragments, falsehoods, and fantasies. It is about things that happened, which caused other things to happen, so that eventually stories emerged."

Children as well as adults often ask Lois Lowry where the ideas for her stories came from. In this fascinating, moving autobiography, the Newbery Medalist answers this and many other questions. Her writing often transports readers into her own world. She explores her rich history...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$11.82
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (36) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $7.85   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Looking Back: A Book of Memories

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 44%)$18.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

"I would like to introduce you to this book. It has no plot. It is about moments, memories, fragments, falsehoods, and fantasies. It is about things that happened, which caused other things to happen, so that eventually stories emerged."

Children as well as adults often ask Lois Lowry where the ideas for her stories came from. In this fascinating, moving autobiography, the Newbery Medalist answers this and many other questions. Her writing often transports readers into her own world. She explores her rich history through family pictures, memories, and recollections of childhood friends. She details pivotal moments that affected her life, inspired her writing, and that magically evolved into rich and wonderful stories that one is reluctant to put down. Lowry fans, and anyone interested in the writing process, will tremendously enjoy this poignant trip through a remarkable writer's past.

Lois Lowry is known for her versatility and invention as a writer. She has received two Newbery Medals, for Number the Stars and The Giver.

Using family photographs and quotes from her books, the author provides glimpses into her life.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Andrea Higbie
...[L]ife for Lowry, as for most everyone else, is never just one big happily-ever-after; there are bumps, dips, valleys...."Time goes on," she wrote in her very first novel, A Summer To Die, "and your life is still there, and you have to live it." —The New York Times Book Review
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Introducing each section of this memoir with an excerpt from one of her novels, the author "unfolds her history in a glorious arc, invisibly threading its parts into a unified whole. Her connection of the everyday details of her life to the larger scope of her work adds a new dimension to her novels," said PW in a boxed review. All ages. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
As a two-time winner of the Newbery medal, Lowery serves up a book that is quite different from her numerous other books written during the last 20 years. This one offers a personal glimpse into her life. However, it is not a typical biography, rather it is reminiscences that have been triggered by looking at a series of pictures mostly taken during her early years. The experiences, according to Lowery, are what provide the fuel and fodder for the books that she has written. The truth of this is demonstrated through the quotes from her books that precede each picture. Lowery has given each episode an intriguing title and succeeds in tantalizing readers with her recollection of the event-what happened and how she felt. While this book will certainly appeal to Lowery fans, it may also inspire nascent writers.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Lowry's books are loaded with versatility, creativity, emotional tones, and interesting perspectives. These same qualities hold true in this selection. The book is partly inspired by her fans' wondering about what has inspired her books. Writers are asked this question all the time, but Lowry is a pensive listener and this question sent her on a backwards journey reviewing her life's "moments, memories, fragments, falsehoods, and fantasies." Short vignettes are highlighted by photographs which help to explain her life and writings. They also initiate thoughts about parallels between herself and her mother, communicate the sadness and joys she's experienced, generate what-ifs, and capture who she is. Each piece is short, beautifully crafted, and poignant. 1998, Delacorte, Ages 9 to 12, $16.00. Reviewer: Susie Wilde
Children's Literature - Jan Lieberman
This recipient of two Newbery Medals has delighted us with over twenty-five books. Now she shares her life with us in a unique autobiography. It includes many family pictures in which she jumps back and forth in time as her story unfolds. It adds an extra dimension to her books because we know her as a daughter, a sister, a wife, a mother and a writer. The joys and the sadness, the triumphs and the disappointments reach out to us, eager readers. Each chapter begins with a quote from one of her books and serves as a jumping off point for the memories that follow. Creative writing teachers will want their students to see how Lowry's own experiences flesh out her characters and their problems. Her creativity makes each story a work of art.
KLIATT
"Memory," wrote Cicero, "is the treasury and guardian of all things." Lois Lowry shares her memories, accompanied by a treasury of family photos, with humor, pathos, and for one so self-conscious as a child, remarkable candor. Her story begins in 1910 with a photo of her grandmother and her mother, a "four-year-old girl with hair ribbons in her curls," who wants to have two little girls when she grows up. She has Helen in 1934 and Lois in 1937. Lowry is herself a tireless photographer of family, so the reader is treated to baby pictures of several generations, as well as accompanying anecdotes, interspersed with quotes from Lowry's books. Pets and favorite clothes are also featured, though not much about her work as an author. Lowry shares the birth of her children, her divorce, her new romance, and her grandchildren. The major themes of Lowry's novels are apparent in her memoirs—family, courage, love, and loss. Sadly, Lowry lost her son Grey in a plane crash in 1995 when he was 36. The reader shares Lowry's life in points of light from a flashbulb, frozen in the emulsion on a piece of film. The experience is complete and healing, a treasury of life. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1998, Random House/Delacorte, 181p, 23cm, $12.95. Ages 13 to adult. Reviewer: Janet Julian; English Teacher, Grafton H.S., Grafton, MA, May 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 3)
Andrea Higbie
...[L]ife for Lowry, as for most everyone else, is never just one big happily-ever-after; there are bumps, dips, valleys...."Time goes on," she wrote in her very first novel, A Summer To Die, "and your life is still there, and you have to live it." -- The New York Times Book Review
From the Publisher
This unusual book contains photographs from Lowry's past and her reflections on them. In the introduction, she suggests that the book will answer readers who ask, "How do you get ideas?" Toward that end, every section begins with a quotation from one of Lowry's books that relates in some way to the subject of the photo. Think of yourself sitting down with Lowry and looking through her albums while she stops and points at pictures of herself as a child and a teenager, photos of her parents and siblings and, then, more recent pictures of her children and grandchildren. Each picture evokes a memory that is a paragraph to a couple of pages long. Readers who remember the deftly portrayed family relationships in Lowry's novels will be fascinated by pictures of Lowry, her older sister, and her younger brother, as well as the often amusing tales of their youth. The mood is not always light, though, and few will be unmoved by Lowry's reflections on her son Grey's death in 1995....Only a writer with Lowry's blend of humor, detachment, and storytelling ability could make the form work.
Booklist, ALA

"Imagine sitting on a sofa with a friend listening with fascination while she tells you about the pictures in her photo album. That is the feeling once has when browsing through this book of Lowry's family snapshots and reading her lively commentary on them. . . . The author's voice comes through strongly as she shares both her happiest and saddest times. . . . Much more intimate and personal than many traditional memories, this work makes readers feel that Lowry is an old friend." School Library Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385326995
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/28/2000
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 482,622
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.74 (w) x 9.03 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Lois Lowry

Lois Lowry is the author of more than thirty books for young adults, including the popular Anastasia Krupnik series. She has received countless honors, among them the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, the California Young Reader’s Medal, and the Mark Twain Award. She received Newbery Medals for two of her novels, NUMBER THE STARS and THE GIVER. Her first novel, A SUMMER TO DIE, was awarded the International Reading Association’s Children’s Book Award. Ms. Lowry now divides her time between Cambridge and an 1840s farmhouse in Maine. To learn more about Lois Lowry, see her website at www.loislowry.com.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

How Do You Do An Introduction

When I was a child - very shy, very self-conscious - I was sometimes taken by my mother to events at which I would be introduced to adults who swooped at me with toothy smiles and unanswerable questions. I had a tendency to look at the ground, scrunch the hem of my dress in my hand, chew on a strand of my own hair, and scuff one shoe against the other during those painful moments.

"Look up!" my mother used to tell me. "Hold your shoulders straight! Look people in the eye! Say, 'fine, thank you, how are you?"

I tried, but it was excruciating. I wasn't fine at all, holding out my nail-bitten hand for a stranger to shake. I was paralyzed, mute, and hoping for a trap door to open beneath me so that I could disappear with a whoosh into some dark cavern where I could curl up with a book until the grownups stopped their socializing.

I still don't like introductions very much. Have you met my nephew, who once scored the winning touchdown for a college in the Midwest? I'd like you to meet Aunt Emma, who is visiting from Seattle, where she raises hybrid peonies. May I present Ogden Weatherbee, who invented the gyrating oscilloscope? I know you will enjoy making the acquaintance of Miss Smirkling, who does wonderful charcoal portraits of miniature poodles as a hobby. And here is Cousin Florence, with her triplets!

Trap-door time!

But I am all grown up now, so I have learned to stand up straight and hold out my hand. Here I am, looking right in the eye. I would like to introduce you to this book. It has no plot. It is about moments, memories, fragments, falsehoods, and fantasies. It is about things that happened, which caused other things to happen, so that eventually stories emerged.

At Boston's Logan Airport, in Terminal C, there is a kinetic sculpture: a sculpture that moves. Even though Terminal C has a food court, seafood restaurant, a bookstore, and even a beauty parlor, it is the always-in-motion, pinging, dinging sculpture that commands the attention of everyone: travelers, toddlers, and trash collectors.

A ball sets off from the top ding! and makes its way through tubes, across intersections, down lifts and stairs and slides; along the way it bumps into another ball chime! and sets that one rolling around corners and along passages, and eventually it, too, collides ping! with another and sends it on its way.

Everything that happens causes something else to happen. Just like life.

A dog bites a mailman and the mailman drops his bag and scatters some letters on the lawn. One disappears under a bush and is lost. Maybe it was a love letter. Maybe the woman who failed to receive the letter decided to heck with it and went to law school - or to Australia - or to a therapist; and because of that, the man who sent the letter but received no reply decided to buy a dog to keep him company; and then he took the dog to obedience classes, where it met a dog who had bitten a mailman, and...

Well, you get the idea.

Stories don't just appear out of nowhere. They need a ball that starts to roll.

Kids ask me all the time: "How do you get ideas?"

When I try to answer, in a general way, they zero right in. "Yes," they say, "but how did you get the idea for-"

Here, in this book, I have tried to answer some of the questions. I looked back, in order to do so, through snapshots of my own past. Here are some of the balls - ping! - at the moment when they start their trip down that complicated passageway that is called life but that also, magically, becomes fiction along the way.

I have given them titles. Strange, evocative titles, some of them, like "Looming Huge," and "Opening a Trunk." They may make you look back and recapture memories of your own. From the memories may come stories. Tell them to your friends. To your family. Tell them to me, won't you? Now that we've been properly introduced?

How do you do!

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Not the best but still good

    It is a book of pictures with a page or two describing it not my favorite:(

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)