Looking Down by Steve Jenkins, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Looking Down

Looking Down

by Steve Jenkins
     
 

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In this wordless picture book, readers first see Earth as the astronauts do. As the point of view moves gradually closer, we can see continents and oceans, then the East Coast of the United States, then a town, until finally we are looking through a boy's magnifying glass at a ladybug. "Beautiful, engaging, and full of possibilities for discussion, the book will be a

Overview

In this wordless picture book, readers first see Earth as the astronauts do. As the point of view moves gradually closer, we can see continents and oceans, then the East Coast of the United States, then a town, until finally we are looking through a boy's magnifying glass at a ladybug. "Beautiful, engaging, and full of possibilities for discussion, the book will be a welcome addition to the collections of young science enthusiasts." -- Horn Book

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"Beginning with an astronaut's-eye view of the Earth, cut-paper collage illustrations of unusual detail gradually decreases the scope to a town, a child on a sidewalk-and a surprising conclusion," noted PW. Ages 4-8. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
Looking down is a wordless book that puts "things" in perspective. The earth is a tiny blue and white ball against a dark sky, with the moon just in front. The collage art pictures move closer and closer to the earth, giving a view similar to that which the astronauts see, until viewers reach the earth and see a tiny ladybug under a young boy's magnifying glass.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-The Earth floats in space, a small blue marble, growing with each turn of the page. The North American continent swells until the streets of a (fictional) coastal town become visible, then a particular neighborhood; a dot on the sidewalk becomes a boy with a magnifying glass, viewing-what? A ladybug fills the last page. Using neat, sharp-edged paper collages and pure, simple colors, Jenkins convincingly conveys, better than most aerial photography, both a sense of height and an almost vertiginous feeling of movement in this wordless fall. Books with expanding rather than contracting scales, such as Istvan Banyai's Zoom (Viking, 1995) or the Hirsts' My Place in Space (Orchard, 1990) end on more cosmic notes, but younger readers will find this an exciting, eye-opening slide.-John Peters, New York Public Library
Lauren Peterson
Jenkins' distinctive cut-paper collage illustrations take readers on a fascinating, wordless journey that begins with a look at the earth from outer space and ends with a close-up of a ladybug. The double-page spreads show progressively smaller aerial views of a coastline, a town, a street, and so on, until they finally zoom in on the ladybug as seen through the magnifying glass of a young girl. As with all wordless books, children can apply their own interpretation to the pictures to create a story that is uniquely theirs. The book can also be used by preschool and primary-grade teachers to introduce basic science vocabulary, and of course, it can simply be enjoyed as a work of art.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547349817
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/19/2003
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
85 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Steve Jenkins has written and illustrated many nonfiction picture books for young readers, including the Caldecott Honor-winning What Do You Do with a Tail Like This? His books have been called stunning, eye-popping, inventive, gorgeous, masterful, extraordinary, playful, irresistible, compelling, engaging, accessible, glorious, and informative. He lives in Boulder, Colorado with his wife and frequent collaborator, Robin Page, and their children.

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