Looking Forward

( 2 )

Overview

Published in March 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was first inaugurated, the classic New York Times bestseller Looking Forward delivers F.D.R.'s honest appraisal of the events that contributed to the Great Depression and mirror our own situation today. With blunt, unflinching, and clear prose Roosevelt attacks head-on the failure of the banking system and the U.S. government and sets forth his reasoning and hope for the major reforms of his New Deal.

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Overview

Published in March 1933 when Franklin Delano Roosevelt was first inaugurated, the classic New York Times bestseller Looking Forward delivers F.D.R.'s honest appraisal of the events that contributed to the Great Depression and mirror our own situation today. With blunt, unflinching, and clear prose Roosevelt attacks head-on the failure of the banking system and the U.S. government and sets forth his reasoning and hope for the major reforms of his New Deal.

Compiled from F.D.R.'s articles and speeches, Looking Forward includes chapters such as "Reappraisal of Values," "Need for Economic Planning," "Reorganization of Government," "Expenditure and Taxation," "The Power Issue," "Banking and Speculation," and "National and International Unity" in which Roosevelt argues for the reassessments and reforms that are needed again in American society and throughout the world today.

An inspiring beacon from the past, Looking Forward sheds critical light on today's turbulent world.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439148693
  • Publisher: Touchstone
  • Publication date: 1/13/2009
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,440,620
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.43 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction vii

I Reappraisal of Values 1

II Need for Economic Planning 21

III State Planning for Land Utilization 35

IV Reorganization of Government 49

V Expenditure and Taxation 67

VI Shall We Really Progress? 83

VII What About Agriculture? 97

VIII The Power Issue 109

IX The Railroads 125

X The Tariff 143

XI Judicial Reform 157

XII Crime and Criminals 169

XIII Banking and Speculation 179

XIV Holding Companies 191

XV National and International Unity 201

XVI Inaugural Address 217

Index 227

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Introduction

Discussion Questions: Looking Forward

1. How is the current economic crisis similar to and different than the Great Depression?

2. Looking Forward was published in March 1933 when FDR was first inaugurated. Which of FDR's suggestions for fixing the economy outlined in Looking Forward were implemented in his presidency and which were not?

3. In the chapter on the failing railroad industry FDR states, "The problem of the railroads is the problem of each and every one of us. No single economic activity enters into the life of every individual so much as do these great carriers." Do you think the same statement could be made about the auto industry today? Are any of FDR's suggestions for fixing the railroad industry applicable to the auto industry?

4. In the introduction, FDR states that even in times when the nation is feeling discouraged and depressed if the quality of political leadership is right, this mood "should vanish so utterly that it will be difficult to reconstruct." Do you think that political leaders can have this positive effect on the mood of the country? Did FDR do this for the American people? Does Barack Obama?

5. FDR states that "We must work towards the time when a major depression cannot occur again; and if this means sacrificing the easy profits of inflationist booms, then let them go — and good riddance." Do you think that the government programs that FDR introduced in his New Deal such as Social Security, Federal Deposit Insurance, and the Securities and Exchange Commission ensure that a major depression cannot occur again? Is the prevention of depression even possible or inevitable due to human nature and thenature of economic cycles?

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Reading Group Guide

Discussion Questions: Looking Forward

1. How is the current economic crisis similar to and different than the Great Depression?

2. Looking Forward was published in March 1933 when FDR was first inaugurated. Which of FDR's suggestions for fixing the economy outlined in Looking Forward were implemented in his presidency and which were not?

3. In the chapter on the failing railroad industry FDR states, "The problem of the railroads is the problem of each and every one of us. No single economic activity enters into the life of every individual so much as do these great carriers." Do you think the same statement could be made about the auto industry today? Are any of FDR's suggestions for fixing the railroad industry applicable to the auto industry?

4. In the introduction, FDR states that even in times when the nation is feeling discouraged and depressed if the quality of political leadership is right, this mood "should vanish so utterly that it will be difficult to reconstruct." Do you think that political leaders can have this positive effect on the mood of the country? Did FDR do this for the American people? Does Barack Obama?

5. FDR states that "We must work towards the time when a major depression cannot occur again; and if this means sacrificing the easy profits of inflationist booms, then let them go — and good riddance." Do you think that the government programs that FDR introduced in his New Deal such as Social Security, Federal Deposit Insurance, and the Securities and Exchange Commission ensure that a major depression cannot occur again? Is the prevention of depression even possible or inevitable due to human nature and thenature of economic cycles?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A must read, must own book for everyone!

    I absolutely loved this book and it is a surprisingly quick but informative read. It is a compilation of subjects that Franklin D. Roosevelt wrote upon that focused on government and economy during the beginning of the Great Depression. This is a great read because it allows readers to get inside the head of one of our most influential presidents. They get to read what he thought in his own words.

    This book is not just about the past. It is relevant today because of the deep recession that America and some parts of the world are in. I would recommend this to everyone but especially to people who are particularly interested in Franklin D. Roosevelt and what his opinions really were on various aspects of government and economy.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 25, 2012

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