Looking Into Later Life: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Depression and Dementia in Old Age

Overview

Bringing alive the relevance and value of psychoanalytic concepts in supporting the core role of professionals working directly in services for people who are older, this fascinating new book will also be of interest to analysts and psychotherapists interested in old age and the application of psychoanalytic thinking in the public sector.

Davenhill shares an approach that has been helpful to her as a clinical psychologist working within the NHS and as a psychoanalyst working ...

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Looking into Later Life: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Depression and Dementia in Old Age

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Overview

Bringing alive the relevance and value of psychoanalytic concepts in supporting the core role of professionals working directly in services for people who are older, this fascinating new book will also be of interest to analysts and psychotherapists interested in old age and the application of psychoanalytic thinking in the public sector.

Davenhill shares an approach that has been helpful to her as a clinical psychologist working within the NHS and as a psychoanalyst working with people coming for consultation and intensive psychoanalytic treatment in the latter part of the lifespan. It will become evident to the reader that while each chapter is different and stands in its own right, there are certain psychoanalytic concepts which appear and reappear again and again. Specifically these are the concepts of transference, counter transference and projective identification, which are the theoretical and clinical bedrock on which psychoanalytic psychotherapy rests. Each chapter offers a different lens to the reader that will broaden and deepen understanding of such core concepts and their straightforward applicability in strengthening the quality of treatment offered both within old age services and psychological therapy services for people who are older in the public sector.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Looking Into Later Life offers a sensitive, thoughtful and accessible perspective on the experience of later life based on psychoanalytic concepts. Psychoanalytic ideas are brought to life through discussion, observation, case examples and personal accounts, providing a framework for their application in the care and treatment of older people and in supporting staff working in care settings. This book will be a valuable resource for those of any discipline of professional background working in old age care. It will also be of interest to psychotherapists and psychoanalysts working other people.”

“For far too long, ageing and the issues facing older people in later life were neglected by the psychoanalytic community. This landmark volume represents the culmination of efforts by Rachael Davenhill and her colleagues to put older people centre stage in psychoanalytic thought and practice It is a book full of the creativity, depth and wisdom that one would hope for from this approach. This is one of the few books on ageing to really do justice to the lived experiences of older people, and it will be a real source of inspiration, hope and learning for psychological therapists working with the increasing number of older people and their supporters.”

Dr. Linda Clare
“Looking Into Later Life offers a sensitive, thoughtful and accessible perspective on the experience of later life based on psychoanalytic concepts. Psychoanalytic ideas are brought to life through discussion, observation, case examples and personal accounts, providing a framework for their application in the care and treatment of older people and in supporting staff working in care settings. This book will be a valuable resource for those of any discipline of professional background working in old age care. It will also be of interest to psychotherapists and psychoanalysts working other people.”
Bob Woods
“For far too long, ageing and the issues facing older people in later life were neglected by the psychoanalytic community. This landmark volume represents the culmination of efforts by Rachael Davenhill and her colleagues to put older people centre stage in psychoanalytic thought and practice It is a book full of the creativity, depth and wisdom that one would hope for from this approach. This is one of the few books on ageing to really do justice to the lived experiences of older people, and it will be a real source of inspiration, hope and learning for psychological therapists working with the increasing number of older people and their supporters.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781855754478
  • Publisher: Karnac Books
  • Publication date: 9/28/2007
  • Series: Tavistock Clinic Series
  • Pages: 362
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Rachael Davenhill is a psychotherapist specializing in the older patient at the Tavistock Clinic.

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Table of Contents

Series Editor’s Preface; About the Editor and Contributors; Preface; Introduction; PART I OVERVIEW: PAST AND PRESENT: 1) Developments in Psychoanalytic Thinking and in Therapeutic Attitudes and Services—Rachael Davenhill; PART II MAINLY DEPRESSION: 2) The Metapsychology of Depression—Cyril Couve; 3) Assessment—Rachael Davenhill; 4) Individual Psychotherapy—Rachael Davenhill; 5) Couples Psychotherapy: Separateness or Separation? An Account of Work with a Couple Entering Later Life—Anne Amos and Andrew Balfour; 6) “Tragical-Comical-Historical-Pastoral”: Groups and Group Therapy in the Third Age—Caroline Garland; 7) The Experience of an Illness: The Resurrection of an Analysis in the Work of Recovery—Ronald Markillie; PART III OBSERVATION AND CONSULTATION: 8) Psychodynamic Observation and Old Age—Rachael Davehill, Andrew Balfour and Margaret Rustin; 9) Consultation at Work—Maxine Dennis and David Armstrong; 10) Where No Angels Fear to Tread: Idealism, Despondency, and Inhibition in Thought in Hospital Nursing—Anna Dartington; PART IV DEMENTIA: 11) Only Connect: The Links Between Early and Later Life—Margot Waddell; 12) No Truce with the Furies: Issues of Containment in the Provision of Care for People with Dementia and Those Who Care for Them—Rachael Davenhill; 13) Facts, Phenomenology, and Psychoanalytic Contributions to Dementia Care—Andrew Balfour; 14) The Pink Ribbon—A. S. Byatt; 15) Caring for a Relative with Dementia: Who is the Sufferer?—Heather Wood; 16) My Unfaithful Brain: A Journey Into Alzheimer’s Disease—Anna Dartington and Rebekah Pratt; 17) Conveying the Experience of Alzheimer’s Disease Through Art: The Later Paintings of William Untermohlen—Patrice Polini; References; Index.
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