Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps

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Overview

When Mary Matsuda was 16 years old, her life changed forever. Mary's happy carefree life growing up on a berry farm in Washington State ended the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Along with her brother Yoneichi, and her parents, Mary was forced to leave her Vashon Island home and face imprisonment in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II. Why? Because Mary was Japanese American and she looked like the enemy.

Just when Mary was preparing to spring into ...

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Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps

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Overview

When Mary Matsuda was 16 years old, her life changed forever. Mary's happy carefree life growing up on a berry farm in Washington State ended the day the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Along with her brother Yoneichi, and her parents, Mary was forced to leave her Vashon Island home and face imprisonment in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II. Why? Because Mary was Japanese American and she looked like the enemy.

Just when Mary was preparing to spring into adulthood, her life tumbled into uncertainty and an unknown future. She wondered if she would ever see her home again, or worse, die. For four years, the Matsuda family faced hardships, anxiety and discrimination, but in the end they persevered. Mary's story is honest, heartbreaking, and hopeful. Her life will inspire young readers to find strength as they face their own difficult times. For ages 9 and up.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780939165582
  • Publisher: NewSage Press
  • Publication date: 1/11/2011
  • Edition description: Special Edition
  • Pages: 264
  • Sales rank: 218,217
  • Age range: 8 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The Day My Life Changed Forever 1

Chapter 2 Am I American or Japanese? 7

Chapter 3 Being Japanese in America 15

Chapter 4 Burning Our Japanese Treasures 23

Chapter 5 The FBI Searches Our House 30

Chapter 6 Leaving Our Home 35

Chapter 7 Family Number 19788 43

Chapter 8 The First Internment Camp 53

Chapter 9 Moved Again 64

Chapter 10 Last Dance in the Searchlight 72

Chapter 11 Dignity in the Midst of Hardship 77

Chapter 12 Collecting Seashells at Tule Lake 87

Chapter 13 Sharing Stories 92

Chapter 14 Making Friends 98

Chapter 15 Freedom 107

Chapter 16 No No or Yes Yes? 115

Chapter 17 The Great Divide 125

Chapter 18 Heart Mountain Internment Camp 133

Chapter 19 Remembering Twenty Years From Now 143

Chapter 20 Yoneichi Goes to War 152

Chapter 21 Nursing School 158

Chapter 22 Going Our Own Ways 168

Chapter 23 On My Own 175

Chapter 24 Nisei Soldiers 185

Chapter 25 The War Ends 192

Chapter 26 Home Again 196

Chapter 27 Mama-San 207

Chapter 28 Return to Minidoka Internment Camp 215

Afterword 223

Acknowledgments 231

Author Interview 233

Vocabulary Words 239

Glossary of Japanese Words and Phrases 243

Teacher's and Reader's Guide 246

Students' Writing and Research Activities 248

About the Authors 250

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 27, 2010

    A captivating story told through the eyes of a 17 year old American citizen whose freedom along with over 120,000 other Japanese and Japanese-Americans was taken away during one of the most unjust declarations in American history.

    This book is fascinating and well written as it takes you back through the eyes of a young Japanese-American citizen trying to understand why she and over 120,000 other Japanese and Japanese-American citizens could possibly have their freedom taken away in this great nation of ours. Mary Matsuda Gruenewald's chronicled events answered for me many questions I've wanted to ask of Japanese-American classmates or their parents, but out of respect knew not to ask.

    The frustrations, stigma, and disbelief Mary suffered are clearly expressed. This book provides an understanding of how and why these American citizens could be so disillusioned with our government, yet their resolve allowed this group of American citizens to rebound after WWII and become highly successful for generations to come.

    Mary's proud depiction of her brother Yoneichi, who along with over 18,000 other young, patriotic Americans enlisted in the U.S. Army and fought in the highly decorated 100th/442nd Battalions in the North Africa and European Theatre is inspiring. As a proud son of a father who also served in the in North African/European Theatre during WWII. I can not imagine the frustration of these young Nisei men fighting heroically for our country and having to deal with their family members being held prisoners back home in addition to many suffering the loss of their properties, businesses, and personal belongings.

    This story of reality being dealt with at home by Japanese-Americans and a tribute by exposure for the proud Nisei American patriots who served courageously in the 100th and 442nd Battalions is ripe for a pending screen play. Perhaps, Tom Hanks who has proven to have a very high respect and admiration for the "Greatest Generation," will pursue such a project in the near future. These young Americans bravely took part in an important segment of U.S. history.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project on

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project on the Japanese Internment camps. Look Like The Enemy is the
     true story written by Mary Matsuda who writes how her teenage years had been rip away from her though the Japanese interments
     camps. I was able read the inside look of what happened to the families  during the Japanese interments camp. I really like how she
    wrote the daily routes people did in camps and the how she fought the sad stages in the camps and changes in values. This shows a
     realistic point of view of a Japanese- American though out the book. Not only I like reading the story of how Mary family survived
    and live though the camps. But it gave me all the information I need to complete my research project and to help me understand what
    happen to Japanese-American citizens during world war two. This book also made realize all the struggles many families went though
     this sad event in American history and how they lost so much. If  students want to learn more about the interment camps they should
     read this book they would see all the pain and sadness the Japanese interment camps cause for over twelve thousand Japanese-
    American people in the west coast. This book will forever change my views of the Japanese’s interment camps.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project on

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project on the Japanese Internment camps. This book followed the main 
    character and her family through their lives before and after being put in the camps. The book made me feel connected to the main
    character, Mary, and I felt as though I was with her throughout the book. Not only did it give me information I needed about the camps,
    it gave me information on what was happening outside of the camps while Mary and her family were living in them. The book even
    includes pictures of the memories and places the characters lived. Each chapter is filled with the emotion of Mary and the rest of her
    family, even when they were sent home from the camps. As you read, you will even be able to know what the family did years after
    they were released from the camps and Mary and her brother had a family of their own.You can also learn about what the
    government had done years after the Japanese internment camps and how Mary took part of it with her own family. While reading the
    book, you will learn about the struggles that the Japanese, that were living in America in the 1940s, were faced with and  were forced
    to deal with.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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