Looking North: Writings from Spanish America on the US, 1800 to the Present

Overview

Given recent changes in politics and demographics, Latin America and the United States are becoming increasingly important to one another. Recognition of the two regions' differences and similarities may facilitate a more fruitful relationship, with increased respect and understanding. 

It is with this in mind that editors John J. Hassett and Braulio Muñoz present a collection of writings that provides a look into the ways in which Spanish America has viewed its northern ...

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Overview

Given recent changes in politics and demographics, Latin America and the United States are becoming increasingly important to one another. Recognition of the two regions' differences and similarities may facilitate a more fruitful relationship, with increased respect and understanding. 

It is with this in mind that editors John J. Hassett and Braulio Muñoz present a collection of writings that provides a look into the ways in which Spanish America has viewed its northern neighbor over the past two centuries. Gathered here are pieces by well-known figures from the worlds of Spanish American politics, history, philosophy, creative writing, and culture—names like Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Pablo Neruda.

Divided into three sections, Looking North begins by underscoring the cultural and political differences between the two Americas. It opens with a speech by Simón Bolívar to the Venezuelan Congress in 1819 and closes with an essay by Mario Vargas Llosa from 2006 on the controversial wall being constructed between the United States and Mexico. The second section explores the experiences of Spanish American travelers in the US, beginning with an account of former Argentine president Domingo Sarmiento's fascination with the United States during his travels in 1847 and ending with a 2008 essay by Vargas Llosa on the city of New York. The final section encompasses creative writing and commentaries by some of Spanish America's most gifted poets and novelists. It opens with Rubén Darío's "To Roosevelt" from 1905 and ends with Christine Granados's humorous and profound short story "Inner View," first published in 2006.

Touching on history, sociology, politics, and religion, the writings assembled here will be of interest to humanists, social scientists, and anyone intrigued by the ever-growing connection between the United Sates and Spanish America at all levels.
 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780816529988
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/2012
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

John J. Hassett is the Susan W. Lippincott Professor Emeritus of Modern and Classical Languages at Swarthmore College. He is the co-editor of Towards a Society That Serves Its People: The Intellectual Contribution of El Salvador's Murdered Jesuits. Braulio Muñoz is the Centennial Professor and Professor of Sociology at Swarthmore College. He is the author of A Storyteller: Mario Vargas Llosa between Civilization and Barbarism.
 

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Part I The Two Americas

Simón Bolívar, "The Angostura Discourse" (Selection, 1819) 11

José Martí, "Our America" (1891) 21

José Enrique Rodó, Ariel (Selection, 1900) 30

Manuel Baldomero Ugarte, "An Open Letter to the President of the United States" (1913) 45

Gabriela Mistral, "The Infantilism of the North American" (1944) 52

Leopoldo Zea, "The Culture of the Two Americas" (1971) 56

Salvador Allende, "Chile: Address to the United Nations General Assembly" (1972) 68

Irene Zea, "U.S. Hegemony on the American Continent" (1975) 90

Octavio Paz, "Mexico and the United States: Positions and Counterpositions" (1978) 109

Sergio Marras, "The First New Days: A Conversation with Roberto Fernández Retamar" (Selection, 1991) 127

Armando Roa, "The Historic Significance of the United States" (1997) 143

Mario Vargas Llosa, "A Wall of Lies" (2006) 153

Part II Travelers from the South

Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, "Moral Geography" (1847) 161

Ciro Alegría, "The Race Problem" (1941) 174

Germán Arciniegas, "English Lessons" (1945) 178

Luis Alberto Sánchez, "The First Surprise" (1945) 181

Ernesto Cardenal, "A Trip to New York" (1973) 186

Victor M. Espinosa, "We Didn't Go North to Pick Flowers" (1992) 204

Eduardo Galeano, "Mea Culpa" (1992) 216

Mario Vargas Llosa, "New York, New York" (2008) 220

Part III The United States as Literary Theme

Rubén Darío, "To Roosevelt" (1905) 227

Nicolás Guillén, Selected Poems (1967) 230

Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude (Selection, 1967) 237

Pablo Neruda, Selected Poems (1970, 1973) 242

Mario Benedetti, "The Weeping of Jimmy Swaggart" (1988) 247

Esmeralda Santiago, "The American Invasion of Macun" (Selection, 1993) 250

Christine Granados, "Inner View" (2006) 254

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