Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film History and Method [NOOK Book]

Overview

Film scholarship has long been dominated by textual interpretations of specific films. Looking Past the Screen advances a more expansive American film studies in which cinema is understood to be a social, political, and cultural phenomenon extending far beyond the screen. Presenting a model of film studies in which films themselves are only one source of information among many, this volume brings together film histories that draw on primary sources including collections of personal papers, popular and trade ...
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Looking Past the Screen: Case Studies in American Film History and Method

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Overview

Film scholarship has long been dominated by textual interpretations of specific films. Looking Past the Screen advances a more expansive American film studies in which cinema is understood to be a social, political, and cultural phenomenon extending far beyond the screen. Presenting a model of film studies in which films themselves are only one source of information among many, this volume brings together film histories that draw on primary sources including collections of personal papers, popular and trade journalism, fan magazines, studio publications, and industry records.

Focusing on Hollywood cinema from the teens to the 1970s, these case studies show the value of this extraordinary range of historical materials in developing interdisciplinary approaches to film stardom, regulation, reception, and production. The contributors examine State Department negotiations over the content of American films shown abroad; analyze the star image of Clara Smith Hamon, who was notorious for having murdered her lover; and consider film journalists' understanding of the arrival of auteurist cinema in Hollywood as it was happening during the early 1970s. One contributor chronicles the development of film studies as a scholarly discipline; another offers a sociopolitical interpretation of the origins of film noir. Still another brings to light Depression-era film reviews and Production Code memos so sophisticated in their readings of representations of sexuality that they undermine the perception that queer interpretations of film are a recent development. Looking Past the Screen suggests methods of historical research, and it encourages further thought about the modes of inquiry that structure the discipline of film studies.

Contributors. Mark Lynn Anderson, Janet Bergstrom, Richard deCordova, Kathryn Fuller-Seeley, Sumiko Higashi, Jon Lewis, David M. Lugowski, Dana Polan, Eric Schaefer, Andrea Slane, Eric Smoodin, Shelley Stamp
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780822390138
  • Publisher: Duke University Press
  • Publication date: 10/1/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Jon Lewis is a professor in the English department at Oregon State University. His books include Hollywood v. Hard-Core: How the Struggle over Censorship Saved the Modern Film Industry as well as Whom God Wishes to Destroy: Francis Ford Coppola and the New Hollywood and The New American Cinema, both also published by Duke University Press.

Eric Smoodin is a professor of American studies and director of film studies at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of Regarding Frank Capra: Audience, Celebrity, and American Film Studies, 1930–1960, also published by Duke University Press, and Animating Culture: Hollywood Cartoons from the Sound Era.

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Table of Contents


Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: The History of Film History
Eric Smoodin
I. Institutional Histories
The Beginnings of American Film Study
Dana Polan
The Perfect Money Machine(s): George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and Auteurism in
the New
Hollywood
Jon Lewis
II. Star Studies
Lois Weber and the Celebrity of Matronly Respectability
Shelley Stamp
Tempting Fate: Clara Smith Hamon, or, The Secretary as Producer
Mark Anderson
The Crafting of a Political Icon: Lola Lola on Paper
Andrea Slane
III. Regulation
Going Hollywood Sooner or Later: Chinese Censorship and The Bitter Tea of
General Yen
Eric Smoodin
Plain Brown Wrapper: Adult Films for the Home Market, 1930/1969
Eric Schaefer
IV. Reception
Ethnography and Exhibition: The Child Audience, The Hays Office, and Saturday
Matinees
Richard deCordova
Dish Night at the Movies: Exhibitor Promotions and Female Audiences during the
Great
Depression
Kathy H. Fuller-Seeley
"A Treatise on Decay": Liberal and Leftist Critics and Their Queer Readings of
Depression-Era
U.S. Film
David M. Lugowski
V. Production
Murnau in America: Chronicle of Lost Films (4 Devils, City Girl)
Janet Bergstrom
The American Origins of Film Noir: Realism in Urban Art and The Naked City
Sumiko Higashi
Bibliography
Contributors
Index
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