Loop Group

Loop Group

2.2 19
by Larry McMurtry
     
 

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Loop Group is Larry McMurtry at his contemporary best, a novel that can best be described as Thelma and Louise meets Terms of Endearment, in which two aging ladies set out on a road trip that will take them from Hollywood to Texas, with many adventures on the way.

In perhaps his finest contemporary novel since Terms of Endearment,

Overview

Loop Group is Larry McMurtry at his contemporary best, a novel that can best be described as Thelma and Louise meets Terms of Endearment, in which two aging ladies set out on a road trip that will take them from Hollywood to Texas, with many adventures on the way.

In perhaps his finest contemporary novel since Terms of Endearment, Larry McMurtry, with his miraculously sure touch at creating instantly recognizable women characters and his equally miraculous sharp eye for the absurdities of everyday life in the modern West, writes about two women, old friends, who set off on an adventure—with unpredictable and sometimes hilarious results.

As Loop Group opens, we meet Maggie, whose three grown-up daughters have arrived at her Hollywood home to try and make her see sense about her busy life, a life that intersects with lots of interesting—all right, bizarre—people. Her daughters push her into having a few second thoughts about it, and these are reinforced when her best friend, Connie, seeks an escape from her own world of complex and difficult relationships with men. Maggie conceives the idea of driving to visit her Aunt Cooney’s ranch near Electric City, Texas, and the two women prepare for the trip by buying a .38 Special revolver (which leads to unexpected trouble along the way). This road trip will end by changing their lives.

Alternately hilariously funny and profoundly sad—even tragic—Loop Group is a major Larry McMurtry novel and a joy to read.

Editorial Reviews

Liesl Schillinger
Clearly, more sincere praise of the mature woman is overdue. And McMurtry's adulation is more than sincere, it's heated. He doesn't shy away from the pleasures of sexagenarian flesh: in Los Angeles, Maggie and Connie get up to pretty much everything Debbie got up to in Dallas -- and they intend to continue shopping around.
The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
In his 28th novel, Pulitzer-winner McMurtry again displays his knack for compelling characters and plots, this time as two women of a certain age take a road trip through Texas. Sixty-year-old widow Maggie Clary hasn't felt like herself since her hysterectomy; though her Hollywood company, Prime Loops, is doing well-they dub in the grunts and groans for movie soundtracks-she secretly wonders if she's going "bats." Maggie's three well-intentioned daughters have appeared on her doorstep for a Sunday morning "intervention." Though Maggie's diminutive Sicilian psychiatrist has improved her mood (thanks, in part, to their mid-session sex), she decides to follows the advice of a flirtatious waiter and try a change of scenery. Maggie invites fellow "looper" and best friend Connie (the two have been inseparable-and boy crazy-since they were 14), to join her on a drive to her octogenarian Aunt Cooney's Texas chicken ranch. Despite family troubles that threaten to sabotage their trip, the two stay the course on a road rife with reprobates, from a relentless "professional" hitchhiker to a mild-mannered car thief forever violating his parole. Aunt Cooney's brief appearance is among the high points of McMurtry's life-affirming tale: sporting an "old mashed-up" cowboy hat and an abundance of rouge, the gregarious granny greets her city slicker niece by yanking a pistol out of her pocket and firing shots into the sky. Agent, Andrew Wylie. (Dec. 7) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Maggie is divorced, nearing 60, and still gainfully self-employed on the fringes of the Los Angeles movie industry. Following a hysterectomy, she finds herself feeling low and disengaged from her former self and others. This particularly infuriates her three married daughters, who have always been able to count on Maggie's connection to them and her generosity to their families. In short, it's midlife crisis time, and something must be done. Maggie teams up with her sexy but aging friend Connie, and they light out on a cross-country trip to Texas. They fling caution to the wind, rail against growing older, and decry the loss of their wild, gallivanting, man-cruising days. While the novel's story line conjures images of Thelma and Louise, it rides an easier road, substituting raunchiness for rich narrative and complex characterization. Fun and sex-obsessed, McMurtry's latest (after entries in the "Berrybender Narratives") will find an audience. Recommended for large fiction collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 8/04.]-Sheila Riley, Smithsonian Inst. Libs., Washington, DC Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Best friends since sixth grade and now they're hitting sixty, these two foxy Hollywood working girls. Their friendship is the heart of McMurtry's larky latest, fizzy enough to keep the fans happy. Sunday morning in Hollywood. Maggie Clary is alone in her bungalow, her lifelong home, when all three of her married daughters show up unannounced. They're on a mission to ease Maggie's "despair" following her hysterectomy. She still has her job as manager of a loop group, shepherding her volatile, druggy crew into the mix studios in the unglamorous world of post-production; and she still has a sex life, or did until she dumped the handsome young actor she caught going through her purse. Yet somehow the spark has gone. Might a trip with her old friend Connie revive it? This is an excellent setup, its tone raunchy in a cheerful, nonchalant way, as befits two sexual adventurers (not matrons, insists Connie) who've been "trolling for good-looking guys" since their early teens. And they don't have to be young studs (Maggie realizes she may be falling in love with her ancient Sicilian shrink, despite his S&M games). Once the ladies are on the road, driving to the Texas panhandle to visit Maggie's last living aunt, the writing goes thin. A white-bearded hitchhiker (a wrangler in Rita Hayworth's last movie) and a diminutive Indian who murdered his wife are colorful, but in an ersatz way. Aunt Cooney turns out to be a ruthless old crone overseeing her agribusiness (two million hens), and Maggie and Connie beat a hasty retreat back to LA. A short final section feels overly rushed, making Maggie's closing affirmation of her friendship with Connie less moving than it might have been. The proportions may bewrong, but there's something here for everyone: An affectionate peek at the workers clinging to Hollywood's lowest rung; campy sex; drama on the highway; and canny insights into the dynamics of family and friendship. Agent: Andrew Wylie/The Wylie Agency
From the Publisher
"Loop Group is a playful, naughty, surprising book, painted on a small scale but still big (and only sometimes melancholy) fun."

The Seattle Times

"Entertainingly offbeat."
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"McMurtry's plot is wacky, the style is deadpan and friendly to the two women, and the effect is compelling. This may prove to be the funniest book of the year."
Newhouse News Service

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781439129449
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
06/01/2010
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
566,881
File size:
2 MB

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Loop Group is a playful, naughty, surprising book, painted on a small scale but still big (and only sometimes melancholy) fun."

The Seattle Times

"Entertainingly offbeat."

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"McMurtry's plot is wacky, the style is deadpan and friendly to the two women, and the effect is compelling. This may prove to be the funniest book of the year."

Newhouse News Service

Meet the Author

Larry McMurtry is the author of twenty-nine novels, including the Pulitzer Prize–winning Lonesome Dove, three memoirs, two collections of essays, and more than thirty screenplays. He lives in Archer City, Texas.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Archer City, Texas
Date of Birth:
June 3, 1936
Place of Birth:
Wichita Falls, Texas
Education:
B.A., North Texas State University, 1958; M.A., Rice University, 1960. Also studied at Stanford University.

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2.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Laughs she jus wants attention seriously falling way to get someones attention a for effort
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
LOL
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Forced to read this because I needed to "read better books" and "stop reading trash". Well this book WAS trash. I expected somr great well crafted novel but I got a no funny not suspenseful not sweet not anything but words that had no meaning. Not a good choice.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TwainFanTX More than 1 year ago
I have read much of this man's published writing, and had enjoyed it all, until this one stumbled it's way into my reading list. Oh man. Yes, it truly is that bad. I was actually embarrassed for Mr. McMurtry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book hoping for some light beach reading. I didn't expect 242 pages of trash. This book has no redeeming value unless you enjoy crude sex-crazed episodes of two middle-aged women. I gave it 'one star' only because there was no lower option.
BonnieNH More than 1 year ago
This 8 disc CD story lacked substance and was one of the slowest books I've ever listened to. It discussed a woman feeling sorry for herself for losing her uterus and for the whole story, it was her whining, whining, whining. Save you money and don't buy this one! It was hard to give it even one star. The narrator's voice wasn't very good either.
Razcall More than 1 year ago
What a complete waste of time. Give me the New York City phone book please; I need some better reading! Not only is there no plot, but the "story" just stops as if even Larry McMurtry got bored. I never stop reading any book. I always read cover to cover no matter what, because you never know when something will redeem itself. Unfortunately I've read toilet paper wrappers with more of a story line. I agree with someone else who reviewed, the characters are whiny, the plot is none existent and it's not even heavy enough for a door stop. Save your money and time!
Former_English_Teacher More than 1 year ago
I couldn't even finish this
Debba More than 1 year ago
Main character is whiney, her 3 daughters are whiney, the best friend is whiney, the rest of the loop groupers are whiney... The most interesting character was Dr. Tom - and he got killed off. Not a good book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was so looking forward to a good book but couldn't get past the first 35 pages. It was maudlin and dreary. The professional reviewers made it sound great but I wish I had read some of the readers' reviews before I bought it. I can't believe that most readers like to read a book that uses a foul word so often. And a book about a woman who misses her womb? What was that all about?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was anxious looking up the reviews of this book...what if the reviews were good?, I would have to hang up my reading glasses-but no, the 3 reviews posted by readers of The Loop Group felt the same way I did-it was a complete waste of time to read this book. I pulled it off the shelf at the library thinking Larry McMurtry-he is great, I loved Lonesome Dove-but I was wrong. His characters Maggie,Connie,the daughters, Dr. Tom were forced and not believable-his conversations were boring and he had no handle about their character development-you could not find anyone interesting or endearing, just whiny.
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a waste of time!! I wish that I could retrieve the 10 hours that were spent listening to this piece of drivel. It's a wonder that I kept the car on the road. If this is an example of what a best-selling author can publish, then I should get started on own literary achievements right now!! Don't waste your time on this one!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved Terms of Endearment, so I was expecting to love this book. Forget it. It was such a waste of time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think that Larry McMurtry should stick to writing his westerns. I loved Terms of Endearment but this one wasn't even worth finishing. I 'pulled the bookmark' at page 20.