Loose Threads: Stories to Keep Quilters in Stitches

Overview

One of the countrys best-loved quilters shares her observations on the whys, wherefores, and wonders of applying needle to fabric and creating a world.

A collection of amusing, moving, and invariably wise essays from Helen Kelleys beloved "Loose Threads" column (a favorite of readers of Quilters Newsletter since 1983), this treasury comes together much like the exquisite quilts Kelley creates: painstakingly pieced and stitched to convey not just a moment and its meaning, but the...

See more details below
Hardcover (First)
$15.97
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$17.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (27) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $4.29   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Loose Threads: Stories to Keep Quilters in Stitches

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$17.95 List Price

Overview

One of the countrys best-loved quilters shares her observations on the whys, wherefores, and wonders of applying needle to fabric and creating a world.

A collection of amusing, moving, and invariably wise essays from Helen Kelleys beloved "Loose Threads" column (a favorite of readers of Quilters Newsletter since 1983), this treasury comes together much like the exquisite quilts Kelley creates: painstakingly pieced and stitched to convey not just a moment and its meaning, but the care and craft of quilting that lasts longer than thread holds out. Gathered in book form for the first time, these pieces form a lovely patchwork that will certainly keep.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Helen Kelley's death on

September 1, 2008

marked an enormous loss for the quilting community. Loose Threads becomes a poignant reminder of all that we loved about her and her words of wit and wisdom. These essays will inspire and entertain you no matter where you are in your quilting journey.”—Quiltmaker, Winter 2008

“One of the country's best-loved quilters, and columnist in Quilters Newsletter since 1983, shares her observations on the whys, wherefores, and wonders of applying needle to fabric and creating a world in this collection of amusing, moving and invariably wise essays gathered in book form for the first time. These pieces form a lovely patchwork that will certainly keep.”—Decorating Digest/Craft & Home, December 2008

Quiltmaker
Helen Kelley's death on September 1, 2008 marked an enormous loss for the quilting community. Loose Threads becomes a poignant reminder of all that we loved about her and her words of wit and wisdom. These essays will inspire and entertain you no matter where you are in your quilting journey.
Decorating Digest/Craft & Home
One of the country's best-loved quilters, and columnist in Quilters Newsletter since 1983, shares her observations on the whys, wherefores, and wonders of applying needle to fabric and creating a world in this collection of amusing, moving and invariably wise essays gathered in book form for the first time. These pieces form a lovely patchwork that will certainly keep.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780760332030
  • Publisher: Voyageur Press
  • Publication date: 7/15/2008
  • Edition description: First
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 967,134
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Helen Kelley, of Minneapolis, MN, is America’s most popular quilting columnist and has written for Quilter’s Newsletter for over twenty years. She is a master quilter and has taught and lectured across the country. Helen’s “Renaissance Quilt” was chosen as one of the 100 Best Quilts of the Twentieth Century. She is the author of Every Quilt Tells a Story and Helen Kelley’s Joy of Quilting and is the 2008 inductee into the prestigious Quilter's Hall of Fame.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

 

Preface                      

 

Chapter 1        Every Stitch Tells a Story

Thoughts on Masterpieces

Life on an Ocean Wave

Mama, Where Did I Come From?

I Am a Lady

Sweets for the Sweet

Doing What Comes Naturally

Getting Down to the Nitty-Gritty

10 Signs It’s Time to Clean Out Your Fabric Stash

That Old Time Religion

Tennis Elbow

 

Chapter 2        License to Quilt

X-Rated

Carpe Diem (Seize the Moment)

Here’s a Toast to Quilting!

I Got Music

License No. HK-428-27

Riding Lesson

Let’s Have Another Cup of Coffee

Six Delicious Flavors

Four Days

Tut Tut!

Darn It!

 

Chapter 3        Common Threads

When I’m Calling You

Chit Chat

Griselda

Tuna Melt

Punch Drunk

Who Is the Fairest One of All?

Shape Up or Ship Out

Let Them Eat Cake

How Sweet It Is!

Heavenly Days

Pearly Whites

 

Chapter 4        The House that Quilts Built

                        Flight of Fancy

The High-Powered Finisher-Upper

Trash Collection

To Err Is Human

Little Drops of Water

Memories Are Made of This

Like a Bolt Out of the Blue

A Little Squirrely

The Theory of Relativity

The Ups and Downs of Life

Sunshine and Shadows

 

Chapter 5        I’d Rather Be Quilting

                        Out of Order

Excuse My Dust

One Giant Leaf for Mankind

Will You Join the Dance?

Ecclesiastes

It Is Sometimes Easier to Ride a Camel through the Eye of My Needle than to Thread It

Sinking to a New Low

Aitch-too-oh

Time Goes By

Little Things Mean a Lot

Small Favors

 

Chapter 6        This Patchwork Life

                        Ode to a Grecian Urn

Encore! Encore!

Silver Threads

Sounds Good to Me

Hands Off!

A La Mode

Feeling Groovy

Love’s Old Sweet Song

Declaration of Independence

Pretty Contemporary

 

About the Author

 

Read More Show Less

Preface

I remember the incident very clearly. I was hunched over the copy machine in the office supplies store, concentrating, playing with designs for a twelve-inch friendship quilt block. I enlarged shapes, cut them out and rearranged them. Suddenly, I was aware of a hand moving softly across my back. The hand wandered. It stroked; it plucked. I spun around to face the woman standing behind me.

"What are you doing?" I asked, bewildered.

She was embarrassed.

"Oh," she said, "I was just picking the loose threads off of the back of your shirt."

Later, thinking about those loose threads, I realized how much a part of me they are. Those loose threads are always with me, following me everywhere. They are the little bits and pieces of things that litter my clothes and my life. They are the shreds of every day things and parts of all that happen to me. I am a hand-quilter and in the hours I spend at my quilt frame, I work quietly, stitching inch by inch. While I am stitching, my mind plays games. It looks back over the moments of each day, wandering and wondering. These mental meanderings are my loose threads. They are thoughts about the people around me. They are about daily comings and goings. They are about pattern possibilities and color choices. Because I am lucky enough to love this quilting that I do, these loose threads fill my thoughts with joy and curiosity and laughter, and I write them down.

Sometimes I write about my family. In earlier times it seemed as if I worked overtime to keep the five children fed, washed, ironed, mended, and healthy. Now they are all grown up and gone away, but thanks to the miracle of cell phones, I hear from them regularlyso that I can follow their lives. As I sit and stitch, I sort out the length and breadth of their activities. The grandchildren and great-grandchildren seem to have come along in steady succession and because I have vowed to make a really unique quilt for each of them, some of my thoughts are about inventing new ways to capture their special memories in fabric. This bevy of people-my children, grandchildren, and "greats"-inspire me with their surprising energy and creative productivity. However, the very best thing in my life is my husband, Bill, who encourages me to write down my musings as they flutter through my head. Quilters Newsletter began printing these rambling thoughts years ago in their magazine These good friends were the first to dub them "Loose Threads."

Sometimes my loose threads are about the absurdities that I find lurking in my regular routine. I know that I have a quirky sense of humor, and stuck doors, spilled breakfast cereal, and trips to the fabric store often strike me as very funny. Our lives, yours and mine, are a tapestry of minor moments and I have learned to look at them, laugh at them, and love them. For instance, we have a congregation of squirrels that gather in our yard to cavort and chatter in our walnut trees. As I stand in my workroom early in the morning drinking my first cup of coffee, I watch them from my window. One squirrel has made himself a shallow basin in the dirt beneath the forsythia bush. He is a strange creature, probably mad, because as I watch, he somersaults gleefully in this grassy pit that he has made. I watch his little bottom and his feet fly up and over his ears. Around and around he tumbles. He is exuberant. What ridiculous exhilaration! I relate to that joy because it is so much like the unfettered pleasure I experience when I am feeling fabric, letting it slide through my fingers, watching it change colors in the clear light and discovering grand new ways to stitch it together into fanciful gardens or geometric puzzles. My mind does joyful gymnastics, too, and when I write it about it, it becomes a Loose Threads essay.

Sometimes, my thoughts are spun from my friendships. Quilters are interesting people, and I am grateful to them for enriching my life. I write about them, and when I put it down on paper, it too becomes a Loose Thread.

Sometimes there are brief moments in all of our lives, flashes of discovery and wonder. Finding a rainbow in the sky is a moment of illumination, seeing the colors playing against the depth of the deep purple on one side and blazing with sunshine on the other. All that translucent color has such potential. Marveling at it, I make a trip to the fabric store where I play with reds and purples and yellows to make my own rainbow. The awe I feel as I watch a rolling wave, a darting bird, or the breathless silence of a sunset makes me pause to marvel about miracles. These thoughts spin about in my head and I write about them. They become Loose Threads.

The evening news, a snarled sewing machine, and the local quilt show are all cob-webby notions and mental bits of floss. They are the fiber of my life and I weave them into stories. The wonder of it is that I am an ordinary person, a typical quilter. The fabric of my days is much the same as yours; you and I have so much in common. We share the frantic activity of daily challenges and quiet triumphs. Whether you are a quilter or an appreciator, a lover of beautiful things, you know exactly what I mean, and so I have written down these Loose Threads especially for you.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)